Daniel Carragher

Daniel Carragher
University of Adelaide · School of Psychology

Doctor of Philosophy

About

19
Publications
3,766
Reads
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132
Citations
Introduction
I am a Lecturer at the University of Adelaide. Previously, I completed my PhD in social perception at Flinders University, Australia, before joining the Stirling Face Lab at the University of Stirling as a post-doc in 2020. My research interests include anything to do with Face Perception and Recognition, Face Matching, Social Perception and First Impressions, Ensemble Coding, "The Cheerleader Effect", Facial Asymmetries, and Emotional Expressions.
Education
February 2015 - December 2018
Flinders University
Field of study
  • Cognitive Psychology
March 2011 - November 2014
Flinders University
Field of study
  • Psychology

Publications

Publications (19)
Article
Full-text available
In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, many governments around the world now recommend, or require, that their citizens cover the lower half of their face in public. Consequently, many people now wear surgical face masks in public. We investigated whether surgical face masks affected the performance of human observers, and a state-of-the-art face re...
Article
The cheerleader effect occurs when the same face is rated to be more attractive when it is seen in a group compared to when seen alone. We investigated whether this phenomenon also occurs for trustworthiness judgements, and examined how these effects are influenced by the characteristics of the individual being evaluated and those of the group they...
Article
Full-text available
“The cheerleader effect” refers to the increase in attractiveness that an individual face experiences when seen in a group of other faces. It has been proposed that the cheerleader effect occurs because (a) the visual system rapidly summarises a group of faces into an ensemble representation, (b) which is hypothesised to be highly attractive becaus...
Article
Full-text available
The cheerleader effect occurs when the same individual appears to be more attractive when seen in a group, compared to alone. As observers over-attend to visual information presented in the left visual field, we investigated whether the spatial arrangement of the faces in a group would influence the magnitude of the cheerleader effect. In Experimen...
Article
Full-text available
A turn of the head can be used to convey or conceal emotion, as the left side of the face is more expressive than the right. As the left cheek moves more when smiling, the present study investigated whether perceived trustworthiness is lateralized to the left cheek, using a trust game paradigm. In Experiment 1, participants were asked to share mone...
Article
Full-text available
To slow the spread of COVID-19, many people now wear face masks in public. Face masks impair our ability to identify faces, which can cause problems for professional staff who identify offenders or members of the public. Here, we investigate whether performance on a masked face matching task can be improved by training participants to compare diagn...
Article
In this Journal Club, Daniel Carragher describes a paper on first impressions from facial appearance.
Preprint
To slow the spread of COVID-19, many people now wear face masks in public. Face masks impair our ability to identify faces, which can cause problems for professional staff who must identify offenders and members of the public. Here, we investigate whether performance on a masked face matching task can be improved by training participants to compare...
Article
Healthy individuals typically show a leftward attentional bias in the allocation of spatial attention along the horizontal plane, a phenomenon known as pseudoneglect, which relies on a right hemispheric dominance for visuospatial processing. Also, healthy individuals tend to overestimate the upper hemispace when orienting attention along the vertic...
Article
Individual faces are rated as more attractive when presented in a group compared to when presented individually; a finding dubbed the ‘cheerleader effect’. As a relatively recent discovery, the conditions necessary to observe the effect are not clearly understood. We sought to better define these conditions by examining two parameters associated wi...
Preprint
In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, many governments around the world now recommend, or require, their citizens to cover the lower half of their face in public. Consequently, many people now wear surgical face masks in public. We investigated whether surgical face masks affected the performance of human observers, and a state-of-the-art face reco...
Article
The “cheerleader effect” occurs when the same face is perceived to be significantly more attractive when seen among a group of faces compared to alone. Since perceived attractiveness decreases with additional viewing time, we investigated whether the cheerleader effect occurs simply because the target face is seen for less time in a group than it i...
Preprint
Full-text available
The “cheerleader effect” occurs when the same face is perceived to be significantly more attractive when seen in a group of faces compared to alone. As perceptions of attractiveness decrease with additional viewing time, we investigated whether the cheerleader effect occurs simply because the target face is seen for less time in a group than it is...
Preprint
“The cheerleader effect” refers to the increase in attractiveness that an individual face experiences when seen in a group of other faces. It has been proposed that the cheerleader effect occurs because (a) the visual system rapidly summarises a group of faces into an ensemble representation, (b) which is hypothesised to be highly attractive becaus...
Thesis
Full-text available
Despite the cautionary reminder to never “judge a book by its cover”, we regularly judge others based upon their facial appearance. Far from meaning that we are all terribly judgmental, these trait impressions occur automatically. Even though they are often not accurate, the trait judgments that we make about others can influence our own decision m...
Poster
Full-text available
Faces are perceived to be more attractive when seen in a group than alone, a phenomenon known as ‘the cheerleader effect’. The visual system automatically creates ensemble representations of groups, and the recalled characteristics of individual items from the group are biased toward the ensemble average. Across three experiments, we investigated w...
Poster
Full-text available
Movement asymmetries in the face result in the left side of the face appearing happier than the right, an expression which is often related to the perception of trustworthiness. Using the trust game, in which participants are asked to share money with partners, we investigated whether the left side of the face is seen as more trustworthy than the r...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
My PhD thesis aims to investigate how we make judgments of facial attractiveness for an individual face that is presented among a group of irrelevant faces. Specifically, I am interested in the idea of 'the cheerleader effect', a finding that consistently shows that the same individual is recalled to be more attractive when they are seen among a group of faces than when seen alone. My work draws on social perception, ensemble coding, and the hierarchical structure of visual working memory to investigate the phenomenon.