Daniel Bergin

Daniel Bergin
Oxford Brookes University · Department of Social Sciences

PhD

About

30
Publications
29,080
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
261
Citations
Introduction
Senior Project Manager at GlobeScan, focusing on demand reduction of illegal and unsustainable wildlife trade. I received my PhD "Wildlife Trade in Morocco: Use, Conservation, Laws and Welfare" in Anthropology from Oxford Brookes University in 2019. I have previously worked as a wildlife trade consultant in Malaysia, Indonesia and Lao PDR, and have conducted remote studies on wildlife trade in Belgium, China, Hong Kong, Japan, Laos, Myanmar, The Netherlands, The United Kingdom and Vietnam.
Education
January 2018 - January 2019
Oxford Brookes University
Field of study
  • Wildlife Trade in Morocco: Conservation, Policy and Sustainability
September 2012 - September 2013
Oxford Brookes University
Field of study
  • Primate Conservation

Publications

Publications (30)
Article
Full-text available
The Kingdom of Morocco, situated on the northwestern coast of the African continent, has a population of over 32 million people. It has a relatively well ­developed tourism sector, in part due to stability the region has enjoyed compared to other North African countries and its close proximity to Europe. Morocco is classified as being within the Me...
Article
Full-text available
Hedgehogs are traded locally and often in relatively small num--bers throughout Eurasia and Africa. We here report on the trade in North African Hedgehog Atelerix algirus and to a smaller extent possibly the Desert Hedgehog Paraechinus aethiopicus in Morocco, and provide an overview of the global trade in hedgehogs for medicinal purposes. In 2013 a...
Chapter
Wildlife trade affects primate species worldwide and Asia plays a major role in this trade. Although this practice is centuries old, advances in technology have seen numbers of primates in trade rise to hitherto unseen levels. Primates are traded for scientific research purposes, as ingredients in traditional medicine, as pets, for use in entertain...
Article
In a recent paper in Geoforum, Margulies et al. (2019) outline what they perceive as a bias toward an “Asian super consumer”. They argue that wildlife trade demand reduction campaigns are unfocused, untargeted, and therefore have a tendency to place blame on people of colour and communities in the Global South as key actors in driving illegal wildl...
Article
Full-text available
Currently listed as Endangered on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species, the Straw-headed Bulbul Pycnonotus zeylanicus is being driven towards extinction throughout most of its range by unregulated illegal trade supplying the demand for songbirds. We conducted surveys of bird markets in North and West Kalimantan, and Central, West and East Java b...
Article
Full-text available
To inform efforts at preventing future pandemics, we assessed how socio-demographic attributes correlated with wildlife consumption as COVID-19 (coronavirus disease 2019) first spread across Asia. Self-reported wildlife consumption was most strongly related to COVID-19 awareness; those with greater awareness were 11–24% less likely to buy wildlife...
Article
Full-text available
The global wildlife trade is considered one of the main threats to the conservation of a large number of imperilled species. African Grey parrots are one of the most heavily traded groups of birds, which led the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) to list the species as Endangered in 2016. We aim to gain insight into the nature of...
Article
Full-text available
The dominant approach to combating the illegal wildlife trade has traditionally been to restrict the supply of wildlife products. Yet conservationists increasingly recognise the importance of implementing demand‐side interventions that target the end consumers in the trade chain. Their aim is to curb the consumption of wildlife or shift consumption...
Chapter
Evolution, Ecology and Conservation of Lorises and Pottos - edited by K. A. I. Nekaris March 2020
Book
Full-text available
With roughly 60 per cent of the world’s population, 50 per cent of the world’s greenhouse gas emissions, and 17 of the world’s 28 megacities, the decisions made in Asia Pacific over the next decade will greatly influence global geopolitics and decarbonisation. The impacts that trade conflicts, increased protectionism, or a decoupling of the world’s...
Preprint
Full-text available
The dominant approach to combating the illegal wildlife trade has traditionally been to restrict the supply of wildlife products. Yet conservationists increasingly recognise the importance of implementing demand-side interventions that target the end consumers in the trade chain. Their aim is to curb the consumption of wildlife or shift consumption...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Owing to its remarkable singing ability, the White-rumped Shama (Kittacincla malabarica) is a particularly popular species in the SouthEast Asian cage-bird trade. Despite domestic trade being regulated in six out of nine SouthEast Asian range states, demand continues to put a heavy strain on the region's White-rumped Shama populations. The lack of...
Article
Full-text available
Concerns about trade in wild finches in Algeria - Volume 53 Issue 3 - Daniel Bergin, Vincent Nijman, Sadek Atoussi
Article
Full-text available
Wildlife trade is recognised as an impediment to conservation. Yet, long-term trade data are lacking for many species, precluding analysis of trends and trade dynamics. The Sunda Leopard Cat is endemic to insular Southeast Asia, where despite legal protection, it is openly traded. Data from Java and Bali (1996–2018, 393 surveys, 219 cats recorded i...
Article
Full-text available
The welfare of wild-caught animals in markets has generally been overlooked by both wildlife trade and welfare studies, despite the potential negative impacts on the animals. Morocco is a member of the World Organisation for Animal Health and has proposed draft legislation prohibiting mistreatment or abuse of animals in captivity. There is still, h...
Article
Full-text available
With the rise in popularity and accessibility of the internet, a growing number of people are selling goods online. Classified advertisement websites such as eBay, Gumtree and Craigslist allow users to sell goods or services directly to consumers, bypassing the need for an intermediary. The convenience, anonymity and widespread reach of these websi...
Article
Until the late 1970s spur-Thighed tortoises Testudo graeca, endemic to the Mediterranean region, were exported from range countries in large volumes for the pet trade. Testudo graeca was included on CITES Appendix II in 1975, and in 1978 Morocco introduced national protection, banning domestic and international trade. However, the species is still...
Article
Full-text available
Reptiles are traded globally for medicinal purposes. Historic qualitative accounts of reptiles used as medicine in Morocco are numerous, but contemporary quantitative data are rare. In 2013-2014, we surveyed 49 wildlife markets in 20 towns throughout Morocco, plus the Spanish exclaves of Ceuta and Melilla. We recorded 1,586 specimens of at least ni...
Article
Full-text available
Approximately 25 % of the world’s carnivores are considered threatened with extinction (IUCN2015). Most carnivores face challenges from habitat loss and fragmentation as well as hunting for food, medicinal products and trophies (Karanth and Chellam 2009). Morocco has experienced the extirpation of the lion Panthera leo (Black et al. 2013) and very...
Article
Full-text available
Marrakesh: a centre for tortoise trade - Volume 49 Issue 2 - Daniel Bergin, Molly Gray, Vincent Nijman
Article
Full-text available
Morocco has a diverse and varied landscape and, as part of the Mediterranean basin, is one of the most biodiverse regions in the world and a 'hotspot' for conservation priority. Unfortunately, one aspect of the "exotic" image of the country involves the sale of wildlife for souvenirs, pets and for use as photo props. Rabat, Morocco's capital has no...
Data
A representative, non-exhaustive account of birds observed for sale and as photo props in Morocco during fieldwork conducted in the summer of 2013. Published on the Moroccan Birds blog at: http://moroccanbirds.blogspot.com/2013/12/wild-bird-trade.html

Questions

Question (1)
Question
I have observed a large number of Argus Pheasant, Rhinoceros Hornbill and Helmeted Hornbill feathers in trade and I would like to estimate the number of individual birds required to account for these feathers. I therefore need estimated numbers of tail feathers and wing feathers for each of these species (a range is fine). Are there any resources that could help me or is there anyone who has knowledge of this.
Many thanks in advance,
Daniel

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (2)
Project
We have been researching wildlife trade in Morocco since 2013. Our goal is to expand this research to Algeria and Tunisia in the coming year.
Project
We are a group of researchers, students, and alumni interested in primate conservation and that are linked to the MSc in Primate Conservation at Oxford Brookes University in the UK. As a network we aim to improve our knowledge of primates, their conservation needs, and to assess and implement actions and policies that will benefit primates, their habitats, and the people that live side-by-side with primates.