Dani Nadel

Dani Nadel
University of Haifa | haifa · The Zinman Institute of Archaeology and Department of Archaeology

PhD

About

164
Publications
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Publications

Publications (164)
Article
The kites in the Negev and Sinai deserts1 (n = 57) are the most western of the large game traps in Asia in general, and the Middle East in particular (Plate 8.1). This area is distinctive in having almost exclusively only one relatively small kite type (Bar-Oz and Nadel 2013). The kites here can be divided into two geographical groups: a northern g...
Article
Full-text available
The submerged site of Ohalo II was occupied during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), between 23,500–22,500 cal BP, bridging the Upper Paleolithic/Epipaleolithic transition in the southern Levant. The site is known for the excellent preservation of its brush huts and botanical remains. This study examines the behavior of its past inhabitants through a...
Article
We present the herpetofauna from Raqefet Cave, a Natufian (terminal Pleistocene) cemetery site in Mount Carmel, Israel. We provide a systematic description of the findings. By using intra-site comparisons of diversity and bone fragmentation, we identify possible agents of deposition and modification. To reconstruct the paleoenvironment, we conducte...
Article
Here we report on the unprecedented discovery of the complete skeleton of a ritually interred adult stallion with a bronze ring in its mouth. The horse was buried in a unique 15-meters diameter monumental stone-built tomb excavated in the Aghavnatun necropolis located on the southern slopes of Mt. Aragats, in the northern fringes of the Ararat Depr...
Article
Archaeological starch spherulites discovered at the submerged 23,000-year-old site of Ohalo II, Sea of Galilee, Israel, provide a new line of archaeobotanical evidence for plant food processing. Six-hundred and thirty-two (632) starch spherulites were recovered from four stone implements. The analysis of starch spherulites from reliable archaeologi...
Article
Raqefet Cave is located in southeast Mount Carmel, Israel. It contains a long archaeological sequence with two major occupations: in the early Upper Paleolithic (Levantine Aurignacian culture, ca. 36,000–35,000 cal. BP) and the Late Epipaleolithic (Natufian culture, ca. 14,000–12,000 cal. BP). Abundant charred remains were found in the cave's depos...
Poster
Full-text available
Raqefet cave is part of a wider research project based on the archaeobotanical analysis, radiocarbon dating and stable carbon isotope analysis of plant samples from four Epipaleolithic sites on Mount Carmel. The project aims to identify the plants used by the foragers and characterize the changes in the environment and climate in the area through t...
Article
В статье рассматривается редчайшая находка — полный скелет взрослого жеребца с бронзовым кольцом в пасти, находившийся в ритуальном погребении — каменной гробнице диаметром 15 м — на могильнике Агавнатун на южных склонах г. Арагац, которая обрамляет с севера Араратскую долину в Республике Армении. Могильный курган имеет округлую форму; останки лоша...
Article
The shift from mobile hunting-gathering lifeways to sedentism has been frequently studied, and the Natufian culture is commonly recognized as the earliest sedentary society in the Levant. Historically, the remarkably rich Natufian material remains, combined with certain research biases, turned it into a “scene-stealer” in the Levantine Epipaleolith...
Article
Full-text available
The miniaturization of stone tools, as reflected through the systematic production of blade-lets and bladelet tools (microliths), characterized many industries of the Late Pleistocene, with the Levantine Epipalaeolithic serving as a well-studied example. It is commonly held that microliths were used as modular inserts in composite projectiles, whil...
Article
Full-text available
TheNatufiancultureisthefirstculturalentityinthesouthernLevant to have large graveyardsand a wide array of symbolicexpressions. Hundreds of Natufian burials have been discovered and studied; at some Natufian sites the presence of stone slabs within the graves has been recorded. One interesting yet rare phenomenon documented is the slabs bearing clea...
Article
TheNatufiancultureisthefirstculturalentityinthesouthernLevant to have large graveyardsand a wide array of symbolicexpressions. Hundredsof Natufian burials have been discovered and studied; at some Natufian sites the presence of stone slabs within the graves has been recorded. One interesting yet rare phenomenon documented is the slabs bearing clear...
Article
Full-text available
The study of Natufian bedrock features and boulder mortars received little scholarly attention and has been largely overlooked for nearly 90 years since Dorothy Garrod first defined this intriguing South Levantine culture (Garrod 1932, 1957; Garrod and Bate 1937). The fact that they have been mentioned only briefly by most scholars, and that their...
Article
The production of lime plaster is considered as one of the hallmarks of the Pre-Pottery Neolithic B [PPNB] period in the Southern Levant, where lime plaster has been used not only in architectural but also in mortuary contexts. In this study we investigate the technology used to produce plaster associated with an infant burial found in the PPNB lay...
Article
Late prehistoric and early historic communal hunting sites along the southwestern mountainous margins of the Great Basin, United Sates, include timber-built corral-traps estimated to be only a few hundred years old. In most of these, no animal bones or direct evidence for the targeted species were found in the corrals. Our goals were to characteriz...
Article
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Nahal Shelef (formerly known as Site 138 in Olami’s survey) is a quarry and workshop site in the Menashe Hills, Israel. The site is located on a flat hill and is characterized by limestone bedrock with numerous massive flint nodules partly exposed on the surface. These nodules were exploited during the Neolithic-Chalcolithic periods as evident by t...
Article
Full-text available
Neve David is a large Epipaleolithic (Geometric Kebaran) site located at the outlet of Nahal Siah from the Carmel range to the coastal plain. During the 1980s excavations and the renewed campaign since 2014, a variety of Holocene features were found intruding into the Geometric Kebaran deposits. Here we present the post-Epipaleolithic features and...
Article
Full-text available
Fermented and alcoholic beverages played a pivotal role in feastings and social events in past agricultural and urban societies across the globe, but the origins of the sophisticated relevant technologies remain elusive. It has long been speculated that the thirst for beer may have been the stimulus behind cereal domestication, which led to a major...
Article
Full-text available
Analysis of ca. 17,000 fish remains recovered from the late Upper Paleolithic/early Epi-Paleolithic (LGM; 23,000 BP) waterlogged site of Ohalo II (Rift Valley, Israel) provides new insights into the role of wetland habitats and the fish inhabiting them during the evolution of economic strategies prior to the agricultural evolution. Of the current 1...
Data
Data (xls file) with Ohalo II fish remains and specimen catalogue numbers. (XLS)
Article
This paper employs new phytolith evidence to consider how Early Epipaleolithic people at the site of Kharaneh IV (Azraq Basin, Jordan) used local plant resources to construct their huts, and furnish their indoor space. Forty-five sediment samples from Structure 1 were compared to previously published results (10 sediment samples) from the well-pres...
Article
Full-text available
Engraved artifacts from pre-Natufian Levantine Epipaleolithic contexts are notable for their scarcity. This is so even though a number of implements have recently been added to the inventory. We present here an analysis of two engraved flint nodules recovered from the Geometric Kebaran site of Neve David (Mt. Carmel, Israel) incorporating use-wear...
Article
Some 180 desert kites were reported from Armenia, with puzzling aspects regarding the typological variability and distribution patterns. Although the study of kites in southwest Asia has made many recent advances, their dating and cultural context remain uncertain due to apparent limitations. A division of them includes two major categories, v-shap...
Poster
During the Last Glacial Maximum, expansive areas that are now submerged were exposed subaerially. Much of this territory would have been inhabitable, or at least utilized by people. Consequently, it is presumed, and well-accepted, that a significant number of prehistoric sites are now underwater. While efforts have been made to investigate and loca...
Article
The Natufian culture (c. 15–11.5 ka cal BP) marks a pivotal step in the transition from hunting and gathering to sedentism and farming in the Near East. Although conventionally divided into Early and Late phases, this internal chronology lacks support from reliable absolute dates. This is now addressed by new AMS dating from two neighbouring Natufi...
Article
Full-text available
Epipaleolithic hunter-gatherers are often interpreted as playing an important role in the development of early cereal cultivation and subsequent farming economies in the Levant. This focus has come at the expense of understanding these people as resilient foragers who exploited a range of changing micro habitats through the Last Glacial Maximum. Ne...
Article
The Dead Sea drainage basin offers a rare combination of well-documented substantial climate change, intense tectonics and abundant archaeological evidence for past human activity in the Southern Levant. It serves as a natural laboratory for understanding how sedimentation rates in a deep basin are related to climate change, tectonics, and anthropo...
Article
Full-text available
Cultural features such as mortars, basins, and slicks on rock outcrops, boulders, and cave floors have been identified in many parts of the world. They clearly evidence the long history of human use of landscape features; at the same time, they are under-investigated and not well incorporated into archaeological interpretation. Indeed, even accurat...
Article
Full-text available
Shiny grooved rock surfaces found in archaeological sites are common across west Texas and the Southwest (U.S.). In most cases they are cursorily described, with very little in terms of detailed characterization and analysis. Interpretations regarding the meaning of the grooves include fertility rituals and functional use (e.g., bone tool or axe po...
Article
Full-text available
Bedrock features such as hewn mortars and cup-marks are known around the world. In the Levant they first appear in Natufian sites in large numbers, a variety of types and contexts, including habitation sites and burial caves. The Natufian–Pre-Pottery Neolithic A transition witnessed notable changes in these features, including a reduction in their...
Article
Full-text available
Bedrock features such as mortars and cupmarks were first documented in the southern Levant from the late 1920's. They first appear in Natufian sites (15,500–11,500 Cal BP), found in all ecological settings and in some cases encompassing tens and even more than 100 specimens per site. Recent advances in photogrammetry and 3D modeling technology prov...
Article
Full-text available
Use-wear analysis of five glossed flint blades found at Ohalo II, a 23,000-years-old fisher-hunter-gatherers’ camp on the shore of the Sea of Galilee, Northern Israel, provides the earliest evidence for the use of composite cereal harvesting tools. The wear traces indicate that tools were used for harvesting near-ripe semi-green wild cereals, short...
Article
Full-text available
A wide range of stones were found at the 22,000-24,000 year old lakeshore camp of Ohalo II, the Sea of Galilee, Israel. The well-preserved camp includes the floors of six brush huts, several open-air hearths, a grave, a midden, and small installations. Stones were found in all excavated loci. These include a small assemblage of basalt and limestone...
Article
Full-text available
[Report] Bedrock features are a hallmark of the Natufian (ca. 15,000-11,500 cal BP) in the southern Levant and beyond and they include a large variety of types, from deep variants to shallow ones and from narrow mortars to wide basins. They are usually interpreted as food preparation facilities, associated with Natufian intensification of cereal an...
Article
Full-text available
We report genome-wide ancient DNA from 44 ancient Near Easterners ranging in time between ~12,000 and 1,400 BCE, from Natufian hunter–gatherers to Bronze Age farmers. We show that the earliest populations of the Near East derived around half their ancestry from a ‘Basal Eurasian’ lineage that had little if any Neanderthal admixture and that separat...
Preprint
Full-text available
We report genome-wide ancient DNA from 44 ancient Near Easterners ranging in time between ~12,000-1,400 BCE, from Natufian hunter-gatherers to Bronze Age farmers. We show that the earliest populations of the Near East derived around half their ancestry from a ‘Basal Eurasian’ lineage that had little if any Neanderthal admixture and that separated f...
Article
Full-text available
Research on the sedentarization and intensification processes in the Epipaleolithic period of the Levant, which culminated in the Natufian Culture, often turns to the earlier Epipaleolithic cultures to discern the roots of these important developments. Specifically, the investigation of Geometric Kebaran sites in the Mediterranean southern Levant,...
Article
Full-text available
In recent years, the study of percussive, pounding and grinding tools has provided new insights into human evolution, more particularly regarding the development of technology enabling the processing and exploitation of plant resources. Some of these studies focus on early evidence for flour production, an activity frequently perceived as an import...
Article
The Armenian kites are the northernmost known kites in south-west Asia. In contrast to those in the deserts further south, their research has only recently begun. The Armenian kites are situated at high elevations, mostly between 900 and 1500 m above mean sea level, in steppic conditions where Artemisia is at present the dominant shrub on the lands...
Article
A new high-resolution palynological record from the Sea of Galilee (Israel), roughly spanning the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) obtained from a trench dug in the vicinity of the well-dated prehistoric site of Ohalo II (23–24 ka cal. BP) — combined with detailed litho-stratigraphic and magnetic susceptibility analyses — provides evidence of vegetation,...
Article
Full-text available
Weeds are currently present in a wide range of ecosystems worldwide. Although the beginning of their evolution is largely unknown, researchers assumed that they developed in tandem with cultivation since the appearance of agricultural habitats some 12,000 years ago. These rapidly-evolving plants invaded the human disturbed areas and thrived in the...
Article
Abstract: This paper presents burial practices at Tel Roim West (TRW), a small Neolithic mound located on the northern fringes of the Hula Basin, Northern Israel. There are rich Pre-Pottery Neolithic B (PPNB), PPNC and Pottery Neolithic (PN) layers at the site. Eight burials were excavated in the site, each defined as a grave of one individual. Thr...
Article
Full-text available
Using terrestrial laser scanning technology we create high-resolution 3-D models of wild ungulates’ archeological large-game drives (desert kites) and demonstrate how the collected data can be utilized to conduct spatial and architectural analyses. Visual reconstructions show in great detail how kites were constructed according to geographic and to...
Article
Full-text available
Burial and commemorative rites form significant components of many routines and activities accompanying the disposal and remembrance of the dead in numerous past and present societies. Various artifacts seem to have had an important role in burial and commemorative rituals and may have been used to reflect social unity and strengthen group identity...
Article
Full-text available
The term "Desert Kites" is used in Near Eastern archaeology when addressing large game drives found solely in arid environments. There are several types of such features (Bar-Oz and Nadel 2013; Betts and Yagodin 2000; Echallier and Braemer 1995; Helms and Betts 1987; Van Berg et al. 2004), and the ones addressed here are large triangular-shaped con...
Article
Full-text available
Photogrammetry is becoming a basic component of the archaeologist's tool kit. It is quick and cheap in the field, and with the appropriate software provides excellent 3D models of archaeological remains. We hereby report on the first time this method was used for the documentation of deep bedrock mortars. The case study presented is a deep mortar (...
Article
Full-text available
The Southern Levant has a well-established sequence for the Pottery Neolithic period, consisting of three successive cultural entities: The Yarmukian, Lodian and Wadi Rabah cultures. However, in the Hula Valley, located in the northeastern part of the region, the Yarmukian culture is absent. Analysis of the pottery assemblage of the site of Tel Ro`...