Dan Tchernov

Dan Tchernov
University of Haifa | haifa · Department of Marine Biology

PhD

About

55
Publications
6,494
Reads
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1,020
Citations
Additional affiliations
October 2009 - January 2016
University of Haifa
Position
  • Head of Department

Publications

Publications (55)
Article
Toxoplasma gondii has been described in several marine mammals around the world including numerous species of cetaceans, yet infection and transmission mechanisms in the marine environment are not clearly defined. The Israel Marine Mammal Research and Assistance Center has been collating a database of all marine mammal stranding events along the co...
Article
Full-text available
Every summer coastal sharks (mostly sandbar sharks, Carcharhinus plumbeus) come to feed at open-sea fish farms near the Israeli coast, ever since their opening. Three of these sharks appear to suffer injuries of various degrees. At least one of the injured individuals, which suffers from a broken lower jaw, has been sighted at the fish farms every...
Article
Understanding the spatiotemporal abundance of loggerhead (Caretta caretta) and green (Chelonia mydas) sea turtles is crucial for marine conservation. In Israel, at the south-eastern Levant Sea, 10 loggerhead (8 females, 2 males) and 5 green (3 females, 2 males) sea turtles were tracked via satellite telemetry tags. Turtles were tagged post nesting...
Article
Mass coral bleaching is increasing in frequency and severity, leading to the loss of coral abundance and diversity. However, some corals are less susceptible to bleaching than others and can provide a model for identifying the physiological and biogeochemical traits that underlie coral resilience to thermal stress. Corals from Eilat in the Gulf of...
Article
Full-text available
Mariculture production has increased significantly in recent years due to global rise in human population. However, in addition to providing food, fish farms are also a source of nutrients and antibiotics to the water column. Here, we model the nutrient changes originating from fish cages in the Eastern Mediterranean by utilizing a Lagrangian model...
Article
Full-text available
Sea turtles were targeted by fisheries in the Mediterranean from 1920 to 1970 and have undergone severe exploitation. At least 30,000 to 40,000 turtles were caught along the Palestinian coastline during the 1920s to 1930s. Although intentional cap- ture of marine turtles is now illegal, sea turtles are still incidentally caught by the fishing indus...
Article
AimLevels of sea turtle bycatch in the Mediterranean are thought to be unsustainable. We provide a comprehensive overview of adult green turtle (Chelonia mydas) distribution during nesting, migration and foraging phases, highlighting transitory as well as residential areas of high use to facilitate adequate protection for this long-lived, migratory...
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Full-text available
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NCrfI_gangM As most sea turtle populations worldwide are declining, conservation efforts are focused on applying effective management plans to save these threatened populations. In order to rank management plans according to their potential benefit for species recovery and cost effectiveness, Heppell (1996) developed...
Article
During the 2011 exploration season of the EV Nautilus in the Mediterranean Sea, we conducted a multidisciplinary study, aimed at exploring the microbial populations below the sediment-water interface (SWI) in the hydrocarbon rich environments of the Levantine basin. Two ~1000 m deep locations were sampled: sediments fueled by methane seepage at the...
Article
Full-text available
Homologs of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) are a prevalent group of host pigments responsible for the green, red and purple-blue colours of many reef-building corals. They have been suggested to contribute to the striking coloration changes of different corals species in response to wounding and infestation with epibionts/parasites. In order t...
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Full-text available
Insight into the mechanisms that underlie settlement and recruitment is important for our understanding of the demography and ecology of coral reef fish and the biology of their coral host. Current knowledge of larval behaviour leading up to settlement is rather meager, and is mostly derived from controlled experiments under artificial conditions....
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Full-text available
The light-limited environment of tropical coral reefs has not been intensively studied due to technical limitations. Studying this vast part of the coral reef is paramount to understanding the ecological and physiological significance of coral-algae symbiosis and defining the boundaries imposed on its bathymetric distribution by the underwater ligh...
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Corallimorpharians are evolutionarily important relatives to reef-building corals, yet little is known about their ecophysiology. We demonstrate that physiological mechanisms determine, in part, the light-dependent distributional patterns of 2 corallimorpharians, Rhodactis rhodostoma and Discosoma unguja, on coral reefs in the northern Red Sea. Fie...
Article
Following two major extinction events, the late Permian and Triassic/Jurassic, there is a long absence of corals from the geological record followed by a recurrence coral fossils. This unusual disappearance and reappearance, referred to commonly as 'reef gaps', was explained as a failure in sampling effort, and/or the movement of these species into...
Article
Full-text available
Colonies of Trichodesmium spp. are conspicuous, macroscopic components of the life in tropical and subtropical oceans. The large size and the morphology of the colony raise questions regarding the mechanism of carbon supply for photosynthesis. Constraints on these mechanisms may be indicated by the stable carbon isotopic composition (delta(13)C) th...
Article
In their Brevia “Scleractinian coral species survive and recover from decalcification” (30 March, p. [1811][1]), M. Fine and D. Tchernov present an exciting experimental approach documenting how coral skeletons dissolve as a physiological response to increased atmospheric CO2, a subject
Article
Full-text available
Anthropogenic-driven accumulation of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere and projected ocean acidification have raised concerns regarding the eventual impact on coral reefs. This study demonstrates that skeleton-producing corals grown in acidified experimental conditions are able to sustain basic life functions, including reproductive ability, in a se...
Chapter
In this chapter we explore how the evolution of human behavior has led to the current condition, the quantitative impact of humans on ecological and biogeochemical processes, and potential strategies for developing a sustainable partnership between humans and the ecosystems in which they operate. Our basic thesis is that humans appear to have uniqu...
Article
Full-text available
Membrane inlet mass spectrometry indicated massive light-dependent cycling of inorganic carbon between the medium and the cells of various phytoplankton species representing the main groups of aquatic primary producers. These included diatoms, symbiotic and free living dinoflagellates, a coccolithophorid, a green alga and filamentous and single cel...
Article
We describe a novel allelopathic interaction whereby the cyanobacterium Microcystis sp. inhibits photosynthesis in the freshwater dinoflagellate Peridinium gatunenseby abolishing its internal carbonic anhydrase activity. Our analysis indicated a positive correlation between the winter presence of Micro- cystis and the timing of the annual spring bl...
Chapter
Full-text available
In this chapter we briefly present and discuss recent progress in the elucidation of certain physiological and molecular aspects of the cyanobacterial inorganic carbon (Ci)-concentrating mechanism (CCM). The reader is referred to earlier chapters and reviews [1—14] for a comprehensive account of other important aspects, including the acclimation of...
Chapter
Light energy-dependent mechanisms which raises the concentration of CO2 at the carboxylating sites (CCM) have been recognized in many photosynthetic microorganisms [1]. We have followed CO2 and HCO3⁻ fluxes associated with the CCM in several photosynthetic organisms. Sustained net CO2 efflux was observed during net photosynthesis in certain marine...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
Conducting XRF analysis of corals (with S. Shilstein) for Department of Marine Biology, University of Haifa (D. Chernov and Y. Popovitch).