Dan Hirsh Shugar

Dan Hirsh Shugar
The University of Calgary | HBI · Department of Geoscience

PhD, Earth Sciences

About

86
Publications
46,015
Reads
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2,267
Citations
Citations since 2016
48 Research Items
2040 Citations
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20162017201820192020202120220100200300400500
20162017201820192020202120220100200300400500
Introduction
I am a geomorphologist interested in alpine, glacial and fluvial processes and natural hazards.
Additional affiliations
January 2019 - present
University of Calgary
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
January 2019 - present
University of Calgary
Position
  • Managing Director
August 2015 - December 2018
University of Washington Tacoma
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)

Publications

Publications (86)
Article
Full-text available
River piracy—the diversion of the headwaters of one stream into another one—can dramatically change the routing of water and sediment, with a profound e�ect on landscape evolution. Stream piracy has been investigated in glacial environments, but so far it has mainly been studied over Quaternary or longer timescales. Here we document how retreat of...
Article
Full-text available
Nepal's quake-driven landslide hazards Large earthquakes can trigger dangerous landslides across a wide geographic region. The 2015 M w 7.8 Gorhka earthquake near Kathmandu, Nepal, was no exception. Kargal et al. used remote observations to compile a massive catalog of triggered debris flows. The satellite-based observations came from a rapid respo...
Article
This article describes and compares the deposits of four large landslides on two glaciers in Alaska using field mapping and remote sensing. Digital image analysis is used to compare the sedimentological characteristics of nearly 200 000 individual surface blocks deposited by three landslides at Black Rapids Glacier in 2002. The debris sheets of one...
Article
Full-text available
The links between large-scale turbulence and the suspension of sediment over alluvial bedforms have generated considerable interest in the last few decades, with past studies illustrating the origin of such turbulence and its influence on flow resistance, sediment transport and bedform morphology. In this study of turbulence and sediment suspension...
Thesis
Full-text available
This thesis investigates the planform response of proglacial fluvial systems to deglaciation, specifically in northwest North America. Increase glacier retreat is extremely widespread today, drawing our attention to proglacial environments. Fluvial systems are being directly impacted by increasing rates of glacier retreat, resulting in changes to d...
Article
Global warming-induced melting and thawing of the cryosphere are severely altering the volume and timing of water supplied from High Mountain Asia, adversely affecting downstream food and energy systems that are relied on by billions of people. The construction of more reservoirs designed to regulate streamflow and produce hydropower is a critical...
Article
Full-text available
Landslides triggered by earthquake shaking pose a significant hazard in active mountain regions. Steep topography promotes gravitational instabilities and can amplify the seismic wavefield; however, the relationship between topographic amplification and landsliding is poorly understood. Here, we use numerical methods to investigate the link between...
Article
Full-text available
Glacial lake outburst floods, and specifically those triggered by avalanche-induced seiche waves, have been studied in considerable detail during the past several decades. Less attention has been given to other cryospheric flood phenomena, which include floods sourced primarily from englacial conduits, permafrost-linked rockfall and avalanches, and...
Article
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We describe and model the evolution of a recent landslide, tsunami, outburst flood and sediment plume in the southern Coast Mountains, British Columbia, Canada. On 28 November 2020, about 18 million m3 of rock descended 1000 m from a steep valley wall and traveled across the toe of a glacier before entering a 0.6 km2 glacier lake and producing >100...
Preprint
Full-text available
The China-Pakistan Economic Corridor (CPEC) is one of flagship projects of the One Belt One Road Initiative, which faces threats from mountain disasters in the high altitude region, such as glacial lake outburst floods (GLOFs). An up-to-date high-quality glacial lake dataset with critical parameters (e.g. lake types), which is fundamental to flood...
Chapter
This chapter looks mainly at massive rock slope failures that generate high-speed, long-runout rock avalanches onto glaciers in high mountains and from sub-polar through tropical latitudes. Drastic modifications to mountain landscapes and destructive impacts occur, and initiate other, longer-term hazards. Worst-case calamities are where mass flows...
Preprint
Full-text available
On the 7th of February 2021, a large rock-ice avalanche triggered a debris flow in Chamoli district, Uttarakhand, India, leaving over 200 dead or missing. The rock-ice avalanche originated from a steep, glacierized north-facing slope. In this work, we assess the precursory signs exhibited by this slope prior to the catastrophic collapse. We evaluat...
Article
Full-text available
Mountains of the world are fragile eco-and geo-systems that currently face rapid and unprecedented changes associated with global climate change, as well as the expansion of (and exploitation by) societies (Huss et al., 2017; Immerzeel et al., 2020). The retreat and thinning of glaciers, formation of glacial lakes, degradation of mountain permafros...
Article
Full-text available
A deadly cascade A catastrophic landslide in Uttarakhand state in India on February 2021 damaged two hydropower plants, and more than 200 people were killed or are missing. Shugar et al. describe the cascade of events that led to this disaster. A massive rock and ice avalanche roared down a Himalayan valley, turning into a deadly debris flow upstre...
Article
Full-text available
Climate change-driven retreat of glaciers is producing thousands of glacial lakes across mountain regions. These lakes generally grow, coalesce into larger lakes that may produce increased downstream hazards and risks due to glacial lake outburst floods (GLOFs). This study assesses such hazards of Lower Barun Lake located near Mount Everest, Nepal....
Article
Full-text available
Glacial lakes are rapidly growing in response to climate change and glacier retreat. The role of these lakes as terrestrial storage for glacial meltwater is currently unknown and not accounted for in global sea level assessments. Here, we map glacier lakes around the world using 254,795 satellite images and use scaling relations to estimate that gl...
Article
Full-text available
The formation and expansion of Himalayan glacial lakes has implications for glacier dynamics, mass balance and glacial lake outburst floods (GLOFs). Subaerial and subaqueous calving is an important component of glacier mass loss but they have been difficult to track due to spatiotemporal resolution limitations in remote sensing data and few field o...
Article
The October 17th, 2015 Taan Fiord landslide and tsunami generated a runup of 193 m, nearly an order of magnitude greater than most previously surveyed tsunamis. To date, most post-tsunami surveys are from earthquake-generated tsunamis and the geomorphic signatures of landslide tsunamis or their potential for preservation are largely uncharacterized...
Article
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A new open–source software tool, called GLAM BioLith–RT (Glacier Lakes Assisted Melting Biological Lithological Radiative Transfer), has been developed for modeling of Radiative Transfer (RT) in water bodies containing suspended lithic particles, phytoplankton, dissolved salts, and colored dissolved organic matter. Although our objective is an appl...
Article
Full-text available
Cascading hazard processes refer to a primary trigger such as heavy rainfall, seismic activity, or snow melt, followed by a chain or web of consequences that can cause subsequent hazards influenced by a complex array of preconditions and vulnerabilities. These interact in multiple ways and can have tremendous impacts on populations proximate to or...
Article
Full-text available
https://www.nps.gov/articles/aps-18-1-2.htm
Article
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Evolution of the 2014 Vulcan Creek landslide-dammed lake, Yukon, Canada, using field and remote survey techniques Abstract The Vulcan Creek landslide is a 1 to 2 × 10^6 m^3 landslide that occurred in southwest Yukon between 15 August and 9 September 2014. The elevation difference between the landslide headscarp and distal extent of the deposit is 3...
Preprint
Full-text available
We report on an exciting study comparing the size, colour, expired status, and fullness of the bottles of pills in the medicine cabinets of two earth scientists who have not actually met except on Twitter. The results are astounding and statistically (in)significant. We also show a map and some pictures in the style of McNoleg (1996), who really di...
Article
Full-text available
On April 20, 2017, a flood from the Barun River, Makalu-Barun National Park, eastern Nepal formed a 2–3-km-long lake at its confluence with the Arun River as a result of blockage by debris. Although the lake drained spontaneously the next day, it caused nationwide concern and triggered emergency responses. We identified the primary flood trigger as...
Article
A large subaerial landslide entered Taan Fiord, Alaska, on 17 October 2015 producing a tsunami with runup to 193 m. We use LiDAR data to show the slide volume to be 76 +3/-4 million m3 and that 51 million m3 entered Taan Fiord. In 2016, we mapped the fjord with multibeam bathymetry and high-resolution seismic data. Landslide and post-landslide depo...
Article
Full-text available
Glacial retreat in recent decades has exposed unstable slopes and allowed deep water to extend beneath some of those slopes. Slope failure at the terminus of Tyndall Glacier on 17 October 2015 sent 180 million tons of rock into Taan Fiord, Alaska. The resulting tsunami reached elevations as high as 193 m, one of the highest tsunami runups ever docu...
Article
Full-text available
This paper describes a collaboration between a visual artist and geoscientists, who together viewed the same rugged, high mountain landscape through different, yet complementary, lenses. We pair scientific mapping and historic comparative photography with a series of site-specific sculptural installations to interpret the dramatic geological change...
Article
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Glacier recession driven by climate change produces glacial lakes, some of which are hazardous. Our study assesses the evolution of three of the most hazardous moraine-dammed proglacial lakes in the Nepal Himalaya—Imja, Lower Barun, and Thulagi. Imja Lake (up to 150 m deep; 78.4 × 106 m3 volume; surveyed in October 2014) and Lower Barun Lake (205 m...
Article
Full-text available
Despite recent research identifying a clear anthropogenic impact on glacier recession, the effect of recent climate change on glacier-related hazards is at present unclear. Here we present the first global spatio-temporal assessment of glacial lake outburst floods (GLOFs) focusing explicitly on lake drainage following moraine dam failure. These flo...
Article
On 17 October 2015, a landslide of roughly 60×10⁶ m³ occurred at the terminus of Tyndall Glacier in Taan Fiord, southeastern Alaska. It caused a tsunami that inundated an area over 20km², whereas the landslide debris itself deposited within a much smaller area of approximately 2km². It is a unique event in that the landslide debris was deposited in...
Article
After retreat of the Cordilleran Ice Sheet (CIS) and subsequent glacio-isostatic adjustment of the central coast of British Columbia (BC), Canada, a complex coastline emerged as relative sea level rapidly reached equilibrium and maintained stability over the end of the Late Pleistocene and Holocene. This study provides a late Quaternary reconstruct...
Presentation
Full-text available
We review geochronological data obtained from four localities on the coast of British Columbia (BC), Canada: Hunter and Calvert islands of the Central Coast, and Quadra and Savary islands of the Discovery Islands region further south. The luminescence characteristics of samples used for optical dating, including quartz and feldspar optical signals,...
Article
Full-text available
Despite recent research identifying a clear anthropogenic impact on glacier recession, the effect of recent climate change on glacier-related hazards is at present unclear. Here we present the first global spatio-temporal assessment of glacial lake outburst floods (GLOFs) focusing explicitly on lake drainage following moraine dam failure. These flo...
Article
Full-text available
A glacial readvance during retreat of the Cordilleran Ice Sheet, British Columbia central coast – ERRATUM - Volume 88 Issue 2 - Jordan B.R. Eamer, Dan H. Shugar, Ian J. Walker, Olav B. Lian, Christina M. Neudorf, Alice M. Telka
Article
Descriptions of the Cordilleran Ice Sheet retreat after the last glacial maximum have included short-lived readvances occurring during the Older and Younger Dryas stadial periods and into the Holocene, but identification of these events has been largely limited to southwest and central British Columbia and northwest Washington State. We present evi...
Article
Several methods exist that use sediment properties to characterize depositional setting and related mechanisms of transport, including analysis of grain-size distributions, sediment petrology, micromorphology, and grain structure. Techniques that rely on electron or optical microscopy produce results with varying degrees of success and applicabilit...
Conference Paper
The 2014 Vulcan Creek landslide was the reactivation of a prehistoric rock slope failure in Kluane National Park and Reserve, Yukon. Vulcan Creek is a tributary of the Slims River near its delta in Kluane Lake. The area is prone to landslide activity due to its high topographical relief, weak rock mass (the tectonic terrane bounding Duke River Faul...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The standard expression for soil gravimetric water content is on a dry basis (mass of water per unit mass of dry soil). In ice-rich soil, this method may produce extremely high values that are difficult to interpret. Alternatively, the wet-basis gravimetric water content (mass of water per unit mass of field-moist soil) may be used. Until now, this...
Research
Full-text available
The April 25, 2015 magnitude 7.8 Gorkha earthquake in Nepal produced a landslide dam on the Marshyangdi River, 1.1 miles (1,800 meters) upstream from the village of Lower Pisang. The dam has impounded the river, produced a landslide-dammed lake extending approximately 1,722 feet (525 meters) up the river, and satellite imagery shows that the lake a...
Research
Full-text available
The April 25, 2015, magnitude 7.8 Gorkha earthquake in Nepal violently shook regions of icy peaks and valleys in parts of the high Himalaya closest to the epicenter. The University of Arizona, in collaboration with NASA and a team of international scientists produced a map showing the susceptibility of glaciers in Nepal and neighboring Tibet to pro...
Article
Full-text available
Post-glacial sea level dynamics during the last 15,000 calendar years are highly variable along the Pacific coast of Canada. During the Last Glacial Maximum, the Earth's crust was depressed by ice loading along the mainland inner coast and relative sea levels were as much as 200 m higher than today. In contrast, some outer coastal areas experienced...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Glacier extent and rela@ve sea level on the Gulf of Alaska margin Glaciers and rela@ve sea level in the Gulf of Alaska may have controlled the @ming of human dispersal into Americas. Finding key archaeological Sites depends on knowing glacial and sea-­‐level histories. Ice-­‐Free Corridor opens ?13-­‐14,000? cal yr BP (Dyke, 2004; Meltzer, 2013) Be...