Dan V Palcu

Dan V Palcu
Utrecht University | UU · Department of Earth Sciences

Dr.-Ing
Geochronology and palaeoenvironmental reconstructions of ancient mega-lakes and marine, brackish and evaporitic basins.

About

44
Publications
22,707
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371
Citations
Introduction
I am a geoscientist specializing in paleomagnetism, geochronology, and stratigraphy. I develop palaeogeographic, paleoenvironmental, and paleolandscape reconstructions. My current projects focus on: - ocean and marine connectivity, the evolution of ocean passages and sea-straits; - connectivity-driven environmental changes, in deep oceans and epicontinental seas; - landlocked basins - paleoenvironmental evolution and reconnections with the global ocean.
Additional affiliations
November 2018 - December 2018
University of São Paulo
Position
  • PostDoc Position
July 2013 - June 2017
Utrecht University
Position
  • PhD Student
Description
  • Geological Mapping (Field assistant) Paleomagnetism (practicals)
September 2012 - June 2013
University of Bucharest
Position
  • Research Assistant
Description
  • Physical geology (practicals) Geological Mapping (practicals) Structural Geology (practicals)
Education
July 2013 - June 2018
UTRECHT UNIVERSITY
Field of study
  • Paleomagnetism

Publications

Publications (44)
Article
Marine gateways prove to be important factors for changes in the ecology and biochemistry of marginal seas. Changes in gateway configuration played a dominant role in the Middle Miocene paleogeographic evolution of the Paratethys sea that covered Central Eurasia. Here, we focus on the connection between the Central (CP) and Eastern Paratethys (EP)...
Article
Paratethys, the lost sea of central Eurasia, was an anoxic giant during Oligocene – early Miocene (Maikop Series) times. With a size matching the modern-day Mediterranean Sea and a history of anoxic conditions that lasted for over 20 Myrs, the eastern part of this realm (Black Sea-Caspian Sea domain) holds key records for understanding the build-up...
Article
During the middle Miocene (15-12 Ma), the paleoenvironmental conditions in the Paratethys Sea of Central Europe changed from normal marine to hypersaline and from normal marine to brackish-marine conditions. These paleoenvironmental changes do not consistently correlate to global sea-level curves, indicating other driving mechanisms. Water circulat...
Article
Full-text available
The largest megalake in the geological record formed in Eurasia during the late Miocene, when the epicontinental Paratethys Sea became tectonically-trapped and disconnected from the global ocean. The megalake was characterized by several episodes of hydrological instability and partial desiccation, but the chronology, magnitude and impacts of these...
Article
Full-text available
A complex interplay of palaeoclimatic, eustatic and tectonic processes led to fragmentation and dissipation of the vast Tethys Ocean in Eocene-Oligocene times. The resulting Paratethys Sea occupied the northern Tethys region on Eurasia, grouping water masses of various subbasins, separated from each other and from the open ocean through narrow and...
Article
A large and highly dynamic aquatic system called Paratethys governed important elements of the middle and late Miocene (15.97–5.33 Ma) hydrology in western Eurasia. So far, the impact of the vast Paratethys water body on the Eurasian climate, however, is not yet understood. Here we apply biomarker analyses coupled to compound-specific hydrogen and...
Article
Full-text available
The Dacian Basin was uniquely situated to record late Miocene hydrological changes that influenced depositional environments and faunal dispersal patterns in Central Eurasia’s megalake Paratethys. Differences between the high strontium isotope ratio (87Sr/86Sr) of the water from Lake Pannon and local Carpathian rivers and low 87Sr/86Sr of the Easte...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The largest megalake in the record formed in Eurasia during the late Miocene, when the epicontinental Paratethys Sea became tectonically-trapped and disconnected from the global ocean. The Paratethys megalake was characterized by several episodes of hydrological instability and partial desiccation, but the chronology, magnitude and impacts of these...
Article
Full-text available
The KNM-ER 2598 occipital is among the oldest fossils attributed to Homo erectus but questions have been raised about whether it may derive from a younger horizon. Here we report on efforts to relocate the KNM-ER 2598 locality and investigate its paleontological and geological context. Although located in a different East Turkana collection area (A...
Article
Full-text available
The Northern Aegean region evolved during the Miocene as a restricted land-locked basin with small ephemeral connections to both the Eastern Paratethys (former Black Sea) and Mediterranean. Its biostratigraphic data show mixed Paratethys-Mediterranean components, but the Paratethys fauna has generally been neglected for chronologic reconstructions....
Article
Full-text available
The early Paleogene sedimentary record of the São Paulo Plateau holds the key to understanding the timing and mechanisms of the onset of Atlantic oceanic circulation, with implications for ocean-climate feedback systems. The timing and evolution of South Atlantic Ocean connectivity remain poorly understood, hindering a full understanding of modern...
Article
The sedimentary succession along the Belaya River (North Caucasus) provides a record of middle Eocene to Miocene sediments. This time interval is well known for its important climatic transitions (e.g., Middle Eocene Climate Optimum (MECO) and Eocene-Oligocene Transition (EOT)), and changes in basin configuration from Peri-Tethys to Paratethys. The...
Article
The sedimentary succession along the Belaya River (North Caucasus) provides a record of middle Eocene to Miocene sediments. This time interval is well known for its important climatic transitions (e.g., Middle Eocene Climate Optimum (MECO) and Eocene-Oligocene Transition (EOT)), and changes in basin configuration from Peri-Tethys to Paratethys. The...
Article
Full-text available
The mid-Langhian (“Badenian”) flooding fully reconnected the semi-isolated Central Paratethys realm with the Mediterranean and, thereby, drastically changed the middle Miocene paleogeography of Central Europe. Due to the scattered stratigraphic record and scarcity of independent age constraints in some areas, the precise age and underlying mechanis...
Article
Various hypotheses exist on the age and origin of the so-called “Pebbly Breccia” unit in the deep-sea record of DSDP Hole 380A of the Euxinian (Black Sea) Basin. Here, we present a detailed study of diatom and nannofossil assemblages of Hole 380A. Our diatom records show a characteristic sequence of appearance of markers species, which we can corre...
Article
Full-text available
Litho- and biostratigraphic data are provided of 5 stratigraphic sections in Romania covering the “Badenian” marine flooding that occurred in the Central Paratethys during the middle Miocene (Langhian). The dataset includes stratigraphic logs and descriptions of the profiles, and biostratigraphic analyses on calcareous nannofossils and foraminifera...
Article
Full-text available
Central Eurasia underwent significant paleoclimatic and paleogeographic transformations during the middle to late Miocene. The open marine ecosystems of the Langhian and Serravallian seas progressively collapsed and were replaced in the Tortonian by large endorheic lakes. These lakes experienced major fluctuations in water level, directly reflectin...
Article
Full-text available
In this contribution the polished stone artefacts from the Neolithic settlement at Şoimuş - La Avicola (Ferma 2), Hunedoara County are analysed. These items belong to Turdaş facies and were discovered during rescue excavations on the A1 Motorway route in 2011. The items are analysed from the point of view of their typology, technology and context,...
Article
Full-text available
The Miocene epicontinental Paratethys Sea of central Eurasia has experienced multiple restriction and reconnection events to the open ocean. Magnetostratigraphy is an important dating tool to better understand the temporal and spatial paleoenvironmental variations associated with these changes. Magnetostratigraphy in the Paratethys domain, however,...
Article
The Miocene palaeogeographic evolution of the Paratethys Sea is still poorly constrained. Here, we use modern Mediterranean biochronology to provide an up-to-date overview of changing seas in Central Europe. Instead of a Paratethys sea that waxed and waned with fluctuating global sea level, we show that the evolution of different seas was mainly co...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Aims: The marine gateways are an important element in the geographic and paleogeographic architecture of oceans and seas. They influence the heat and chemical exchange between neighboring water bodies, mixing or segregating them and influencing the climate and the ecosystems. In extreme configurations, they contribute to the formation of evaporites...
Poster
Full-text available
The marine gateways are an important element in the geographic and paleogeographic architecture of oceans and seas. They influence the heat and chemical exchange between neighbouring water bodies, mixing or segregating them and influencing the climate and the ecosystems. In extreme configurations, they play a role in the onset of Salinity Crises an...
Poster
Full-text available
A fort Hoofddijk team presentation. People at the paleomagnetic Laboratory ‘Fort Hoofddijk’ study the history of the geomagnetic field and explore the way the field is recorded in rocks. Knowledge of the ancient magnetic field is used for past geomagnetic field behaviour, magnetostratigraphic dating and reconstruction of tectonic rotations. This kn...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The Neogene system of seas and lakes of Eurasia, known as the Paratethys realm, is an incomparable natural laboratory to study environmental changes under different geodynamic and climatic conditions. Here, past changes of the marine connections, in conjunction with changes in hydrological budgets and water circulation patterns have repeatedly caus...
Article
Full-text available
Throughout the Late Neogene, the Black Sea experienced large paleoenvironmental changes, switching between (anoxic) marine conditions when connected to the Mediterranean Sea and (oxic) freshwater conditions at times of isolation. We create a magnetostratigraphic time frame for three sites drilled during Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) Leg 42B to t...
Article
The Badenian–Sarmatian boundary interval is marked by a major extinction event of marine species in the Central Paratethys. The exact age of the boundary is debated because many successions in marginal basins show erosional features and fauna reworking at the boundary level. Here, we selected the Tisa section in the Carpathian foredeep basin of Rom...
Poster
Full-text available
The Badenian-Sarmatian Extinction Event (BSEE) is considered the strongest turnover event in the history of Paratethys (Piller et al. 2007). It marks the disappearance of open marine ecosystems that are replaced by brackish and freshwater environments. The cause of the BSEE is considered to be the restriction of the connections with the open ocean...
Conference Paper
Modern Industry requires a committed participation in activities that are linked in Sustainable Development (SD), Stakeholder Engagement (SE) and Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR), but in many such cases in Romanian cases, such activities meet an unprepared local territory that does not manage to keep up with the above-mentioned initiatives. To...
Book
Full-text available
PARATETHYS-MEDITERRANEAN INTERACTIONS - ENVIRONMENTAL CRISES DURING THE NEOGENE
Book
Full-text available
Ghidul este adresat celor interesaţi de un turism inteligent, educativ, care respectă natura şi cultura locală, doritori să guste rafinamentul unei vieţi tradiţionale rurale dar şi să participe la bunăstarea comunităţii gazdă. Geoparcul Dinozaurilor Ţara Haţegului, dincolo de rolul său în conservarea patrimoniului natural şi cultural, constituie un...
Book
Full-text available
Locul in care te nasti si traiesti nu este nici cel mai urit loca si nici la capatul lumii. Locul acest este centrul universului si cel mai fabulos tinut posibil. Trebuie doar sa-l descoperi. Pachetul educational este unic in Romania ca abordare si continut. Se adreseaza elevilor de gimnaziu si cuprinde Ghidul profesorului, Caietul elevului si anex...

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Projects

Project (1)
Archived project
Paratethys was a large epicontinental sea, stretching from Germany to China at the beginning of the Oligocene (~34 Myr ago), that progressively retreated by a complex combination of basin infill, glacio-eustatic sea-level lowering and tectonic uplift to its present-day remnants: Black Sea, Caspian Sea and Aral Lake. The influence of Paratethys on global change is still a great unknown, mainly through lack of relevant studies in this terra incognita, although model studies suggest a major effect of sea retreat on climate and environment. The team in this project aims to comprehend the causes of the extreme environmental changes that occurred in Central Eurasia. High-resolution geochronology together with integrated stratigraphy and geochemical proxies (deuterium, strontium, neodymium) are critical to unravel internal (geodynamics, tectonic uplift) from external (climate, glacio-eustatic sea-level change) forcing factors and to resolve the effects of Paratethys restriction (regional climate perturbations, biotic crises, aridification). Three time slices exist when progressive sea retreat and variations in interbasinal connectivity generated extreme environmental changes: 1) The birth of Paratethys (~34 Ma), resulting in deposition of anoxic shales during a complex combination of tectonic uplift and global cooling. 2) Its midlife crisis in the middle Miocene (~14-11 Ma) when gateway restriction created massive salt deposits during the middle Miocene climate transition. 3) The demise of Paratethys (~9-4 Ma), transforming open marine environments into lacustrine deltaic systems, and leading to alternating phases of desiccation and flooding. Updating the chronostratigraphic framework means that we need to critically revise existing (bio)stratigraphic data according to the newest standards, and, above all, we need to look and communicate beyond borders to correlate critical Paratethys events. The new stratigraphic insights can be used for numerical modeling studies. Moreover, fundamental rock magnetic studies are needed to standardize microfossil iron sulphide (greigite) techniques, intended to revolutionize magnetostratigraphic dating in brackish-lacustrine paleoenvironments. This multi-disciplinary approach provides the only way to attain a comprehensive system view on long-term Paratethys evolution.