Damien R. Farine

Damien R. Farine
University of Zurich | UZH · Institut für Evolutionsbiologie und Umweltwissenschaften

About

207
Publications
42,906
Reads
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6,535
Citations
Introduction
Damien R. Farine currently works the University of Zurich and the Australian National University. His current project is 'Social structure, leadership and collective decision making in the vulturine guineafowl (Acryllium vulturinum)'.
Additional affiliations
October 2015 - present
Max-Planck-Institut für Ornithologie, Teilinstitut Radolfzell
Position
  • Principal Investigator
December 2013 - September 2015
University of Oxford
Position
  • PostDoc Position
September 2013 - September 2015
University of California, Davis
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Education
January 2000 - November 2004
Griffith University
Field of study
January 2000 - November 2004
Griffith University
Field of study

Publications

Publications (207)
Article
Full-text available
Helping kin or nonkin can provide direct fitness benefits, but helping kin also benefits indirect fitness. Why then should organisms invest in cooperative partnerships with nonkin, if kin relationships are available and more beneficial? One explanation is that a kin-limited support network is too small and risky. Even if additional weaker partnersh...
Article
Full-text available
Null models are an important component of the social network analysis toolbox. However, their use in hypothesis testing is still not widespread. Furthermore, several different approaches for constructing null models exist, each with their relative strengths and weaknesses, and often testing different hypotheses. In this study, I highlight why null...
Article
Full-text available
1.Animal social networks are descriptions of social structure which, aside from their intrinsic interest for understanding sociality, can have significant bearing on across many fields of biology. 2.Network analysis provides a flexible toolbox for testing a broad range of hypotheses, and for describing the social system of species or populations i...
Article
Full-text available
Conflicts of interest about where to go and what to do are a primary challenge of group living. However, it remains unclear how consensus is achieved in stable groups with stratified social relationships. Tracking wild baboons with a high-resolution global positioning system and analyzing their movements relative to one another reveals that a proce...
Article
Full-text available
Stress during early life can cause disease and cognitive impairment in humans and non-humans alike [1]. However, stress and other environmental factors can also program developmental pathways [2, 3]. We investigate whether differential exposure to developmental stress can drive divergent social learning strategies [4, 5] between siblings. In many s...
Article
Full-text available
Studying animal behavior as collective phenomena is a powerful tool for understanding social processes, including group coordination and decision-making. However, linking individual behavior during group decision-making to the preferences underlying those actions poses a considerable challenge. Optimal foraging theory, and specifically the marginal...
Preprint
Revealing the consequences of social structure in animal societies is largely determined by our ability to accurately estimate functionally relevant patterns of social contact among individuals. To date, studies have predominantly built up social structure from dyadic connections. However, many associations or interactions can involve more than two...
Article
The stress systems are powerful mediators between the organism's systemic dynamic equilibrium and changes in its environment beyond the level of anticipated fluctuations. Over- or under-activation of the stress systems' responses can impact an animal's health, survival and reproductive success. While physiological stress responses and their influen...
Article
Making a decision as a group requires not only choosing where to go but also when to go. A new study provides experimental evidence that, in jackdaws, vocalisations facilitate synchronous early morning departures from communal roosts.
Article
Full-text available
Social contacts can facilitate the spread of both survival‐related information and infectious diseases, but little is known about how these processes combine to shape host and parasite evolution. Here, we use a theoretical model that captures both infection and information transmission processes to investigate how host sociality (contact effort) an...
Article
Full-text available
Multilevel societies (MLSs), where social levels are hierarchically nested within each other, are considered one of the most complex forms of animal societies. Although thought to mainly occurs in mammals, it is suggested that MLSs could be under-detected in birds. Here, we propose that the emergence of MLSs could be common in cooperatively breedin...
Article
Full-text available
Culturally transmitted communication signals – such as human language or bird song – can change over time through cultural drift, and the resulting dialects may consequently enhance the separation of populations. However, the emergence of song dialects has been considered unlikely when songs are highly individual-specific, as in the zebra finch (Ta...
Article
Dominance is important for access to resources. As dominance interactions are costly, individuals should be strategic in whom they interact with. One hypothesis is that individuals should direct costly interactions towards those closest in rank, as they have most to gain—in terms of attaining or maintaining dominance—from winning such interactions....
Preprint
Full-text available
Spatial and social behaviour are fundamental aspects of an animal’s biology, and the social and spatial environments are indelibly linked through mutual causes and shared consequences. Behavioural variation at the “spatial-social interface”, which we define as the intersection of social and spatial aspects of individuals’ phenotypes and environment...
Article
Full-text available
In many animal societies, individuals differ consistently in their ability to win agonistic interactions, resulting in dominance hierarchies. These differences arise due to a range of factors that can influence individuals’ abilities to win agonistic interactions, spanning from genetically driven traits through to individuals’ recent interaction hi...
Article
Full-text available
The vast majority of interspecific interactions are competitive or exploitative. Yet, some positive interspecies interactions exist, where one (commensalism) or both (mutualism) species benefit. One such interaction is cleaning mutualisms, whereby a cleaner removes parasites from a client. In this note, we document the novel observation of a black‐...
Article
Full-text available
Recent well-documented cases of cultural evolution towards increasing efficiency in non-human animals have led some authors to propose that other animals are also capable of cumulative cultural evolution, where traits become more refined and/or complex over time. Yet few comparative examples exist of traits increasing in complexity, and experimenta...
Preprint
GPS-based tracking is a widely used automated data collection method for studying wild animals. Much like traditional observational methods, using GPS devices to study social animals requires making a number of decisions about sampling that can affect the robustness of a study's conclusions. For example, sampling fewer individuals per group across...
Article
Understanding the dynamics of small-scale fisheries requires considering the diversity of behaviours and skills of fishers. Fishers may have different abilities and tactics that can translate into different fishing outcomes. Here, we investigate variation in fishing behaviours among traditional net-casting fishers that are assisted by wild dolphins...
Article
Full-text available
Despite the ecological importance of pair bonding, the ontogeny of pair bond formation remains poorly understood. We capitalized on long-term high-resolution tracking of social interactions across replicated colonies of captive zebra finches, Taeniopygia guttata, to map the dynamics of social relationships prior to reproduction and to identify the...
Preprint
Full-text available
Multilevel societies (MLSs), where social levels are hierarchically nested within each other, are considered one of the most complex forms of animal societies. Although thought to mainly occur in mammals, it is suggested that MLSs could be under-detected in birds. Here we propose that the emergence of MLSs could be common in cooperatively breeding...
Article
Objective: The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) plays a relevant role in regulating blood pressure and thus maintaining cardiovascular homeostasis. While it was recently shown that RAAS parameters are responsive to acute psychosocial stress, the psychobiological determinants of the acute stress-induced RAAS activation have not yet been...
Article
Full-text available
Permutation tests are widely used to test null hypotheses with animal social network data, but suffer from high rates of type I and II error when the permutations do not properly simulate the intended null hypothesis. Two common types of permutations each have limitations. Pre‐network (or datastream) permutations can be used to control “nuisance ef...
Article
Full-text available
Dispersal is a critical process that shapes the structure of wild animal populations. In species that form multi‐level societies, natal dispersal might be social (associating with a different social community while remaining near the natal area), spatial (moving away from the natal area while continuing to associate with the same community) or both...
Article
Full-text available
Social animals face daily challenges to fulfil feeding, resting and social needs. In vervet monkeys, Chlorocebus pygerythrus, females are the core of the social group, in which relationships are mainly established and maintained through grooming. However, social relationships are not necessarily mutual or driven by the same interests. In a complex...
Article
Full-text available
Background A challenge faced by animals living in groups with stable long-term membership is to effectively coordinate their actions and maintain cohesion. However, as seasonal conditions alter the distribution of resources across a landscape, they can change the priority of group members and require groups to adapt and respond collectively across...
Article
Full-text available
Dispersal is a critical, but costly, stage of life. During the active phase of dispersal—called transience—individuals face many costs, from increased mortality to reduced foraging opportunities. One cost that is often assumed, but rarely explicitly tested, is the energy expended in making large dispersal movements. However, this cost is not only d...
Article
Full-text available
The cover image is based on the Letter Efficient movement strategies mitigate the energetic cost of dispersal by James A. Klarevas‐Irby et al., https://doi.org/10.1111/ele.13763.
Article
Full-text available
By shaping where individuals move, habitat configuration can fundamentally structure animal populations. Yet, we currently lack a framework for generating quantitative predictions about the role of habitat configuration in modulating population outcomes. To address this gap, we propose a modelling framework inspired by studies using networks to cha...
Article
Evading predator attacks requires making rapid decisions. A new study has found that instead of moving towards others, as predicted by classical models of anti-predator behaviour, homing pigeons move away from their flock when faced with an imminent attack.
Preprint
Full-text available
Dominance is important for access to resources. As dominance interactions are costly, individuals should be strategic in who they interact with. One hypothesis is that individuals should direct costly interactions towards those closest in rank, as they have most to gain--in terms of attaining or maintaining dominance--from winning such interactions...
Article
Full-text available
Individuals differ in the quantity and quality of their associations with conspecifics. The resulting variation in the positions that individuals occupy within their social environment can affect several aspects of life history, including reproduction. While research increasingly shows how social factors can predict dyadic mating patterns (who will...
Article
Social learning is a primary mechanism for information acquisition in social species. Despite many benefits, social learning may be disadvantageous when independent learning is more efficient. For example, searching independently may be more advantageous when food sources are ephemeral and unpredictable. Individual differences in cognitive abilitie...
Preprint
In many animal societies, individuals differ consistently in their ability to win agonistic interactions, resulting in dominance hierarchies. These differences arise due to a range of factors that can influence individuals’ abilities to win agonistic interactions, spanning from genetically driven traits through to individuals’ recent interaction hi...
Data
Supplemental Materials for Bond et al. Sociability increases survival of adult female giraffes
Data
Supplementary Information for Bond et al. 2021. Socially defined subpopulations reveal demographic variation in a giraffe metapopulation.
Article
Populations are typically defined as spatially contiguous sets of individuals, but large populations of social species can be composed of discrete social communities that often overlap in space. Masai giraffes (Giraffa camelopardalis tippelskirchi) of Tanzania live in distinct social subpopulations that overlap spatially, enabling us to simultaneou...
Article
Full-text available
The ability to build upon previous knowledge—cumulative cultural evolution—is a hallmark of human societies. While cumulative cultural evolution depends on the interaction between social systems, cognition and the environment, there is increasing evidence that cumulative cultural evolution is facilitated by larger and more structured societies. How...
Preprint
Full-text available
Culturally transmitted communication signals, such as human language or bird song, can change over time through a process of cultural drift, and may consequently enhance the separation of populations, potentially leading to reproductive isolation. Local song dialects have been identified in bird species with relatively simple songs where individual...
Article
Studies increasingly show that social connectedness plays a key role in determining survival, in addition to natural and anthropogenic environmental factors. Few studies, however, integrated social, non-social and demographic data to elucidate what components of an animal's socio-ecological environment are most important to their survival. Female g...
Article
Reproduction is costly. Despite this, evidence suggests that parents sometimes feed unrelated offspring. Several hypotheses could explain this puzzling phenomenon. Adults could feed unrelated offspring that are 1) of their close social associates to facilitate these juveniles’ integration into their social network (the social inheritance hypothesis...
Article
Generating insights about a null hypothesis requires not only a good dataset, but also statistical tests that are reliable and actually address the null hypothesis of interest. Recent studies have found that permutation tests, which are widely used to test hypotheses when working with animal social network data, can suffer from high rates of type I...
Preprint
Full-text available
The ability to build upon previous knowledge—cumulative cultural evolution (CCE)—is a hallmark of human societies. While CCE depends on the interaction between social systems, cognition and the environment, there is increasing evidence that CCE is facilitated by larger and more structured societies. However, the relative importance of social networ...
Article
Full-text available
1. The integration and synthesis of the data in different areas of science is drastically slowed and hindered by a lack of standards and networking programmes. Long‐term studies of individually marked animals are not an exception. These studies are especially important as instrumental for understanding evolutionary and ecological processes in the w...
Article
Full-text available
A challenge of group-living is to maintain cohesion while navigating through heterogeneous landscapes. Larger groups benefit from information pooling, translating to greater ‘collective intelligence’, but face increased coordination challenges. If these facets interact, we should observe a non-linear relationship between group size and collective m...
Article
Full-text available
The concepts of leadership and dominance are often conflated, with individuals high in the social hierarchy assumed to be decision-makers. Dominants can exclusively benefit from monopolizing food resources and, therefore, induce an intragroup conflict when leading their group to these resources. We demonstrate that shared decision-making reduces su...
Preprint
Full-text available
A bstract Social contacts can facilitate the spread of both survival-related information and infectious disease, but little is known about how these processes combine to shape host and parasite evolution. Here, we use a theoretical model that captures both transmission processes to investigate how host sociality and parasite virulence (co)evolve. W...
Article
There is growing interest in the study of multilevel societies, where social units comprising several individual animals (human and non-human) come together to form higher-level groupings. Grueter et al. provided a useful definition of multilevel societies, highlighting that key characteristics of multilevel societies should include stability acros...
Article
Full-text available
The social decisions that individuals make-who to interact with and how frequently-gives rise to social structure. The resulting social structure then determines how individuals interact with their surroundings-resources and risks, pathogens and predators, competitors and cooperators. However, despite intensive research on (i) how individuals make...
Article
Full-text available
Environmental variations can influence the extent to which individuals interact with other individuals by changing the value of grouping. It is well known that many species can form and disband groups, often in response to the distribution and abundance of resources. While previous studies showed that resources influence the broad-scale structure o...
Preprint
Full-text available
The integration and synthesis of the data in different areas of science is drastically slowed and hindered by a lack of standards and networking programmes. Long-term studies of individually marked animals are not an exception. These studies are especially important as instrumental for understanding evolutionary and ecological processes in the wild...
Preprint
Full-text available
Generating insights about a null hypothesis requires not only a good dataset, but also statistical tests that are reliable and actually address the null hypothesis of interest. Recent studies have found that permutation tests, which are widely used to test hypotheses when working with animal social network data, can suffer from high rates of type I...
Article
Full-text available
Living in groups can benefit individuals in many ways, including in innovative problem solving. Several hypotheses have suggested mechanisms to explain why larger groups disproportionately outperform smaller groups, including the skill pool and pool of competence effects. However, disentangling these potential mechanisms from the effects of group s...
Article
Full-text available
Social network analyses allow studying the processes underlying the associations between individuals and the consequences of those associations. Constructing and analyzing social networks can be challenging, especially when designing new studies as researchers are confronted with decisions about how to collect data and construct networks, and the a...
Preprint
Full-text available
By shaping where individuals move, habitat configuration can fundamentally structure animal populations. Yet, we currently lack a framework for generating quantitative predictions about the role of habitat configuration in modulating population outcomes. For example, it is well known that the social structure of animal populations can shape spreadi...
Article
Full-text available
Animals use behavioural cues from others to make decisions in a variety of contexts. There is growing evidence, from a range of taxa, that information about the locations of food patches can spread through a population via social connections. However, it is not known whether information about their quality transmits similarly. We studied foraging b...
Article
Full-text available
Individual identification is a crucial step to answer many questions in evolutionary biology and is mostly performed by marking animals with tags. Such methods are well‐established, but often make data collection and analyses time‐consuming, or limit the contexts in which data can be collected. Recent computational advances, specifically deep learn...
Article
Full-text available
Experimental laboratory evidence suggests that animals with disrupted social systems express weakened relationship strengths and have more exclusive social associations, and that these changes have functional consequences. A key question is whether anthropogenic pressures have a similar impact on the social structure of wild animal communities. We...
Article
Social relationships can have important fitness consequences. Although there is increasing evidence that social relationships carry over across contexts, few studies have investigated whether relationships formed early in life are carried over to adulthood. For example, juveniles of monogamous species go through a major life history stage transitio...
Article
Some nonhuman animals form adaptive long-term cooperative relationships with nonkin that seem analogous in form and function to human friendship [1, 2, 3, 4]. However, it remains unclear how these bonds initially form, especially when they entail investments of time and energy. Theory suggests individuals can reduce the risk of exploitation by init...
Article
Despite decades of research, our understanding of the underlying causes of within-population variation in patterns of extra-pair paternity (EPP) remains limited. Previous studies have shown that extra-pair mating decisions are linked to both individual traits and ecological factors. Here, we examine whether social associations among individuals pri...
Article
Full-text available
Mixed-species animal groups (MSGs) are widely acknowledged to increase predator avoidance and foraging efficiency, among other benefits, and thereby increase participants' fitness. Diversity in MSG composition ranges from two to 70 species of very similar or completely different phenotypes. Yet consistency in organization is also observable in that...
Article
Adriana A. Maldonado-Chaparro and Damien R. Farine, Demographic processes in animal networks are a question of time Amiyaal Ilany, Complex societies, simple processes Orr Spiegel and Noa Pinter-Wollman, Placing the effects of demography on networks in ecological context Ipek G. Kulahci, Individual differences can affect how networks respond to demo...
Preprint
Full-text available
The mechanisms underlying eco-evolutionary dynamics (the feedback between ecological and evolutionary processes) are often unknown. Here, we propose that classical theory from behavioral ecology can provide a greater understanding of the mechanisms underlying eco-evolutionary dynamics, and thus improve predictions about the outcomes of these dynami...
Preprint
Full-text available
Individual identification is a crucial step to answer many questions in evolutionary biology and is mostly performed by marking animals with tags. Such methods are well established but often make data collection and analyses time consuming and consequently are not suited for collecting very large datasets. Recent technological and analytical advanc...
Article
Full-text available
Mammalian societies represent many different types of social systems. While some aspects of social systems have been extensively studied, there is little consensus on how to conceptualize social organization across species. Here, we present a framework describing eight dimensions of social organization to capture its diversity across mammalian soci...
Preprint
Full-text available
Studying the social behaviour of small or cryptic species often relies on constructing space-sharing networks from sparse point-based observations of individuals. Such an approach assumes that individuals that have greater shared space use will also interact more. However, there is very little guidance on how much data are required to construct mea...