Damien Bol

Damien Bol
King's College London | KCL · Department of Political Economy

PhD in Political Science

About

57
Publications
11,606
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1,061
Citations
Introduction
I'm an Associate Professor in Political Behavior at the Department of Political Economy of King's College London. Prior to that, I studied and work at the Université of Montréal and UCLouvain.

Publications

Publications (57)
Article
How does electoral rule disproportionality affect the structure of the party system (i.e. the number and the policy platforms of the competing parties)? By studying a model where both party entry and platform choice are endogenous we are able to provide a unified theory: An increasing electoral rule disproportionality exhibits: a) a first-order neg...
Article
Full-text available
Major crises can act as critical junctures or reinforce the political status quo, depending on how citizens view the performance of central institutions. We use an interrupted time series to study the political effect of the enforcement of a strict confinement policy in response to the COVID‐19 pandemic. Specifically, we take advantage of a unique...
Article
Full-text available
For decades, researchers have examined people’s beliefs across countries and over time using national samples of citizens. Yet, in an era when economies, societies, and policymaking have become increasingly interconnected, nation-states may no longer be the only or most relevant units of analysis for studying public opinion. To examine what people...
Article
Full-text available
Experiments are now common in political science. They are an excellent methodological tool to estimate the causal effect of a treatment on an outcome. In this article, I review the use of lab experiments in political science. After a brief report on their popularity and advantages, I distinguish two ideal-types (economics-based and psychology-based...
Article
Full-text available
There is perennial debate in comparative politics about electoral institutions, but what characterizes this debate is the lack of consideration for citizens' perspective. In this paper, we report the results of an original survey conducted on representative samples in 15 West European countries (N = 15,414). We implemented an original instrument to...
Article
As representative democracy is increasingly criticized, a new institution is becoming popular among academics and practitioners: deliberative citizens’ assemblies. To evaluate whether these assemblies can deliver their promise of re‐engaging the dissatisfied of representative politics, we explore who supports them and why. We build on a unique surv...
Preprint
As representative democracies are increasingly criticized, a new institution is becoming popular in academic circles and real-life politics: asking a group of citizens selected by lot to deliberate and formulate policy recommendations on some contentious issues. Although there is much research on the functioning of such citizens’ assemblies, there...
Article
Full-text available
The validity of democratic support survey questions has been questioned due to variations of democratic understanding levels among respondents, especially in new democracies. Citizens with poor knowledge of the concept tend to offer less informed answers and preferences. We conducted an original survey experiment in Indonesia where we exposed respo...
Preprint
Citizens are increasingly involved in the design of democratic institutions, for instance via referendums. If they support the institution that best serves their self-interest, the outcome inevitably advantages the largest group and disadvantages minorities. In this paper, we challenge this pessimistic view with an original lab experiment in France...
Article
Full-text available
Individual legislators can be important agents of political representation. However, this is contingent upon their responsiveness to constituency requests. To study this topic, an increasing number of studies use field experiments in which the researcher sends a standardized email to legislators on behalf of a constituent. In this paper, we report...
Preprint
Major crises sometimes act as critical junctures whereas other times they reinforce the democratic status quo, depending on how citizens view the performance of central institutions. We use an interrupted time series to study the effects on a set of key political attitudes of the enforcement of a lockdown policy in response to the COVID-19 pandemic...
Article
Electoral systems in which voters can cast preference votes for individual candidates within a party list are increasingly popular. To the best of our knowledge, there is no research on whether and how the scale used to evaluate candidates can affect electoral behavior and results. In this paper, we analyze data from an original voting experiment l...
Article
Full-text available
There is a long tradition of imputation studies looking at how abstainers would vote if they had to. This is crucial for democracies because when abstainers and voters have different preferences, the electoral outcome ceases to reflect the will of the people. In this paper, we apply a non-parametric method to revisit old evidence. We impute the vot...
Preprint
We estimate the causal effect of the number of candidates on turnout in applying a regression discontinuity design (RDD) to data from 13,974 legislative and cantonal electoral districts in France since 1978. In the two-round system used in these elections, the candidates who pass a certain vote threshold in the first round can participate in the se...
Article
Full-text available
In this article, we study how polarization affects the propensity of supporters of non-viable parties to cast a strategic vote. To do so, we rely on Canadian election panel surveys from the Making Electoral Democracy Work project that were specifically designed to identify strategic voting. We find that the polarization between viable parties incre...
Article
This article studies support for upper chamber reforms in multinational countries. In his seminal work on the topic, Lijphart argues that the upper chamber can be used to accommodate minority groups. However, to date, we still know very little about the perception of minority populations of this institution. We explore this topic building upon an o...
Article
Full-text available
The paper builds upon an original pre- and post-election survey that we conducted before and after the 2015 Canadian election. Directly after Election Day, we asked Canadians for which party they voted, and whether they regret their choice. We find that 39% of them are not perfectly happy with their decision, and 4% even say that they made a bad de...
Article
A vast literature shows that voting for the winning party in elections boosts satisfaction with democracy. But in many list PR systems, voters do not only vote for a party, they can also vote for candidates within parties. Yet, we know very little about how such votes affect voters' satisfaction with democracy. In this paper, we analyse pre- and po...
Article
Several scholars have sought to elucidate voting strategies in proportional representation (PR) systems. The argument is that the existence of coalition governments forces voters to consider potential alliances and to vote in order to maximize their chances of influencing the outcome. In this paper, we argue that this vision is incomplete as PR, ju...
Article
Full-text available
In 2013, the American Political Science Association (APSA) Task Force on Political Science, Electoral Rules, and Democratic Governance released a report in which the authors say that more than 50 U.S.-based political scientists have been involved in electoral reform processes in the U.S. and abroad since 2010 (Htun and Powell 2013). In this symposi...
Article
Full-text available
Researchers studying electoral participation often rely on post-election surveys. However, the reported turnout rate is usually much higher in survey samples than in reality. Survey methodology research has shown that offering abstainers the opportunity to use face-saving response options succeeds at reducing overreporting by a range of 4–8 percent...
Article
In mixed-member electoral systems, voters usually have two votes: a nominal and a list vote. According to some studies, voters are increasingly using them to cast a split-ticket vote. However, very little is known about whether the type of mixed-member system, and in particular whether the allocation of seats across tiers is linked or not, creates...
Article
It is a well-established finding that proportional representation (PR) electoral systems are associated with greater legislative representation for women than single member systems. However, the degree to which different types of PR rules affect voting for female candidates has not been fully explored. The existing literature is also hampered by a...
Article
Cet article propose un tour d’horizon de la littérature faisant usage des modèles de compétition électorale avec candidature endogène, modèles qui ont pour ambition, entre autres, d’expliquer le nombre de candidats et leur polarisation dans les élections pluralitaires. Dans une élection pluralitaire, chaque électeur vote pour un seul candidat et le...
Chapter
Laboratory experiments are often criticized for relying on student samples only. In this chapter, we re-analyze four laboratory voting experiments that have been conducted on both student-dominated and more heterogeneous samples. We find very few differences regarding the behavior of subjects. Due to data limitation, our chapter does not offer a de...
Chapter
We know that electoral systems have an effect on the number of competing candidates. However, a mystery remains concerning the impact of majority runoff. According to theory, the number of competing candidates should be equal (or only marginally larger) under majority runoff than under plurality. However, in real-life elections, this number is much...
Article
There is abundant empirical evidence that the plurality rule constrains party competition and favors two-party systems. This reduction of party system fragmentation may be due to parties deciding not to enter elections for which they are not viable and/or voters voting strategically. Yet, no prior research has attempted to estimate the respective r...
Chapter
This article surveys the latest advances in the literature on the comparative properties of different voting procedures in the context of political elections. In particular, we focus on the various attempts at understanding how different voting procedures affect the number of candidates and the positions they adopt. In public debate as well as acad...
Article
Even after a quarter-century of debate in political science and sociology, representatives of configurational comparative methods (CCMs) and those of regressional analytic methods (RAMs) continue talking at cross purposes. In this article, we clear up three fundamental misunderstandings that have been widespread within and between the two communiti...
Article
Many academics and commentators argue that Europe is suffering from a democratic deficit. An interesting proposal that has been put forward to address this problem is to elect some members of the European parliament in a pan-European district. In this article, we evaluate this proposal using an online experiment, in which thousands of Europeans vot...
Article
We survey the literature that compares the theoretical properties of different voting procedures using models of electoral competition with endogenous candidacy. In particular, we focus on the predictions made by these models regarding the number of candidates running for election and their polarization. We organize the different models into three...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Several scholars have sought to elucidate voting strategies in proportional representation systems. Their argument is that the existence of coalition governments forces voters to consider potential alliances and to vote in order to maximize their chances of influencing the outcome. In this paper we argue that this vision is incomplete as proportion...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Several scholars have recently sought to elucidate voting strategies in proportional representation systems. Their typical argument is that the existence of coalition governments forces voters to consider potential alliances and to vote accordingly as to maximize their chances to influence the outcome. However, in this paper we argue that this visi...
Article
We know that electoral systems have an effect on the number of competing candidates. However, a mystery remains concerning the impact of majority runoff. According to theory, the number of competing candidates should be equal (or only marginally larger) under majority runoff than under plurality. However, in real-life elections, this number is much...
Article
Full-text available
This paper reports on an online experiment that took place in several European countries during the three weeks before the 2014 elections for the European Parliament. We created a website where visitors could obtain information about the electoral rules used in different European Member States for this election. Participants were then invited to ca...
Article
There is an assumption in much of the electoral engineering literature that domestic episodes of electoral system choice occur in a vacuum, isolated from international influences. Yet this assumption remains largely untested, despite the comparative focus of much of that literature. This article focuses on part of this gap by considering two electo...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Even after a quarter-century of debate in political science and sociology, representatives of Configurational-Comparative Methods (CCMs) and those of Regressional-Analytic Methods (RAMs) continue talking at cross purposes. In this article, we clear up three fundamental misunderstandings that have been widespread within and between the two communiti...
Article
This paper surveys the literature that uses endogenous candidacy models of electoral competition to explain the number of candidates and the extent of their polarization in elections held under the plurality rule. The plurality rule is the voting rule under which each voter votes for one candidate, and the candidate who gets the most votes is elect...
Article
Previous research has found a positive relationship between having voted for a party that is part of the government and satisfaction with democracy. However, no research has examined this relationship in the specific case of a two-round system. Relying on original panel data survey conducted before and after the 2012 legislative election in France,...
Article
Full-text available
This article provides a first systematic mapping of QCA applications, building upon a database of 313 peer-reviewed journal articles. We find out that the number of QCA applications has dramatically increased during the past few years.The mapping also reveals that csQCA remains the most frequently used technique, that political science, sociology,a...
Article
It is often taken for granted that parties support electoral reform because they anticipate seat payoffs from the psychological and mechanical effects of the new electoral system. Although some studies point out that elements related to values and the willingness to achieve social goals are also relevant to explaining party preference in those situ...
Article
Most of the literature asserts that political parties rationally define their preference for electoral reform with respect to their possible gains and the balance of power between and within parties. Other scholars moderate this rationality, underlining the role of the uncertainty inherent to any change in the electoral system. This article shows h...
Article
Full-text available
This article provides a first systematic review of the connection between public policy analysis and QCA (Qualitative Comparative Analysis) tech-niques, with an emphasis on the state-of-the-art in QCA empirical applica-tions. QCA is first presented both as an approach and as a set of techniques (crisp-set, multi-value and fuzzy-set QCA), both of wh...
Article
Parties' attitudes about changing the electoral system are explained in various ways. The most common approach is based upon rational-choice models stating that parties are first and foremost strategic actors considering any change to the electoral system for its impact on the balance of power between and within parties (Boix, 1999). The dominant m...
Article
Parties' preferences about changing the electoral system are explained in various ways. The most common approach is based upon rational-choice models stating that parties are first and foremost strategic actors considering any change to the electoral system for its impact on the balance of power between and within parties (Boix, 1999). But how prec...
Article
Previous research has found a positive relationship between having voted for a party that is part of the government on the one hand and satisfaction with democracy on the other (Anderson and Guillory, 1997, Blais and Gélineau, 2007, Bowler and Donovan, 2002, Singh et al., 2011). However, little is known about this mechanism in a two-round election...

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