Dale F. Simpson Jr.

Dale F. Simpson Jr.
North Central College · Sociology and Anthropology

Doctor of Philosophy
Dale is an anthropological archaeologist who specializes in Pacific anthropology.

About

25
Publications
10,178
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
73
Citations
Introduction
Dale F. Simpson Jr. (Ph.D., M.A., Postgrad Diploma, B.A.) is an American anthropological archaeologist who specializes in Pacific anthropology but is well–versed in North and South American archaeology. Dale has conducted anthropological investigations in the U.S., Canada, Russia, New Zealand, Tahiti, Hawaii, and Australia. He has researched Rapa Nui since 2001, and has extensively presented and published about Easter Island anthropology, archaeology, geochemistry, material culture studies, and monumental architecture. Dale has conducted and participated in multiple educational outreach programs throughout the world, including on Rapa Nui and in Australia and the U.S.
Additional affiliations
August 2009 - present
College of duPage
Position
  • Instructor
Education
April 2013 - November 2019
The University of Queensland
Field of study
  • Archaeology

Publications

Publications (25)
Article
Many publications document Easter Island's famous ahu (platform), moai (statue), pukao (topknot), and almost millennium-long culture. Yet, little investigation has been dedicated to basalt resources, artifacts, and their geochemistry. As part of the Rapa Nui Geochemical Project (2014-2017), we conducted comprehensive fieldwork , material culture an...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Son muchas las publicaciones que han documentado los famosos ahu (plataformas), moai (estatuas), pukao (tocados) y una cultura casi milenaria. Aun así, se ha dedicado poca investigación a los recursos y artefactos de basalto y su geoquímica. Como parte del Proyecto Geoquímico Rapa Nui (2014 – 2017) hemos realizado un trabajo de campo exhaustivo y a...
Article
Full-text available
Pacific and Rapa Nui (Easter Island) volcanologists, geologists, and geochemists have set the stage for archaeological lithic sourcing studies by providing practical data regarding the island's geodynamic activity, geomorphological formation and dating, and the macroscopic, microscopic, and elemental proprieties of Easter Island stone. Drawing upon...
Thesis
Full-text available
Anthropological archaeologists have been investigating ancient human interaction for decades as interaction studies highlight how humans have communicated for 200,000 years at a variety of spatial and temporal scales. With the development of provenance studies and improved geochemical sourcing techniques, researchers can better document the movemen...
Article
Full-text available
https://www.investigacion.patrimoniocultural.gob.cl/publicaciones/la-economia-politica-de-piedras-arqueologicas-en-rapa-nui-identificacion-de-las Después de nueve años de investigación, estoy feliz de ver este artículo, apoyado por un "grant" de LUPA del Servicio Nacional de Patrimonio Cultural de Chile, finalmente publicado. Los resultados de est...
Article
Full-text available
I highly recommend this 50th edition of Terra Australis. This edited volume provides a long-term, multidisciplinary scientific approach, to investigate and analyse materials found in the 40,000-year archaeological record of the NM. This volume provides significant information about the migration routes of both ancient and modern humans, the movemen...
Article
Full-text available
A Moe Varua article about economic, ideological, and sociopolitical organization during Rapa Nui's pre-contact period.
Article
Full-text available
A Moe Varua article that discusses the moaigraphy of a statue and hat that was originally from Rapa Nui, traveled and stayed on Tahiti for 50 years, before ultimately coming to the Otago Museum in Dunedin, New Zealand, where it has been for 90 years.
Article
Full-text available
Since 2003, Terevaka Archaeological Outreach (TAO, Founded by Dr. Britton Shepardson) has offered unique experiential learning activities to raise awareness regarding cultural and natural resources on Rapa Nui, to promote conservation initiatives, and to conduct original research regarding the island's prehistoric human–environment interactions. TA...
Article
Full-text available
This report provides synthesis and commentary about two international scientific conferences held on Rapa Nui during November 2018. The first conference, the Early Pacific Migration Conference, brought academics in the Oceanic research community together to consider Pacific Ocean and island palaeoecology, the migration of humans, fauna, and flora,...
Article
Full-text available
Rapa Nui is famous for its moai (statues) and ahu (platforms), yet research into the island's many basalt quarries, sources and workshops is limited. These geological and archaeological sites provided the raw materials for tools such as toki (adzes and picks), which facilitated the manufacture of Easter Island's iconic stonework. Other basaltic too...
Article
Full-text available
Resumen: Entre Mayo – Septiembre de 2014, y durante los meses de Enero, Febrero y Abril de 2015, llevé a cabo un trabajo de campo arqueológico y geológico sobre Rapa Nui, para mi doctorado en la Universidad de Queensland (UQ). Esos ocho meses han sido los meses más desafiantes y gratificantes de toda mi carrera, ya que debí navegar por todas las po...
Data
http://www.terevaka.net/toki/index.html Toki Database V.1 (November 9th, 2016) The toki database was created by Dale F. Simpson Jr. through 11 months of archaeological and geological fieldwork on Easter Island, museum research at the Padre Sebastián Englert Anthropological Museum (MAPSE), and geochemical analyses conducted at The Field Museum o...
Article
Full-text available
From May – September 2014 and from January – February 2015, I conducted archaeological and geological fieldwork on Rapa Nui for my doctorate at the University of Queensland (UQ). These six months were the most challenging and rewarding of my career, as I had to navigate the social politics on the island to be granted authorization to conduct scient...
Article
Full-text available
A commentary on Challenging Easter Island's collapse: the need for interdisciplinary synergies by Rull, V., The road to deforestation and its social feedback on Rapa Nui is a fascinating and a possibly important parable; one with symbolic implications for how the rest of the world views environmental change and human impact. Rull et al. (2013) pres...
Article
Full-text available
Abstract: In this article, I review the island’s geodynamic, volcanic, and geological evolution. I focus on three topics: 1) the island’s geomorphological formation and dating; 2) Easter Island’s main volcanoes and their associated geological material; and 3) the rock types on Rapa Nui, their locations in the landscape, and their prehistoric use to...
Article
Full-text available
The Terevaka.net Archaeological Outreach (TAO) program began with the ‘A Pó project on Rapa Nui in 2003 with big ideas as well. Initially, each year was expected to include more Rapa Nui high school students than the previous year. Each class was expected to generate more archaeological data than the last. And over the course of several years, the...
Article
Full-text available
THIS ARTICLE CONCERNS THE CONTRIBUTION by Captain Alfred Walter Francis (A.W.F.) Fuller to The Field Museum’s Easter Island collection. Captain Fuller was an honorary curator at the British Museum, became a Royal Anthropological Institute Fellow in 1910, and had the honor of being named a Patron of The Field Museum in 1958 — a distinction shared at...
Article
Full-text available
Rapa Nui has a rich tradition of cultural evolution, adaptation, and megalithic elaboration. While famous for its monolithic moai, a most intriguing development was the construction, rebuilding, and eventual destruction of the island’s approximately 300 ahu. As fixed sacred and secular features in the landscape, ahu acted as cultural stages in whic...

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (4)
Project
An attempt to establish the journey of a Moai from its source quarry to its current location at Otago Museum, Dunedin, New Zealand where it has been on continuous display since 1929. Unlike more famous Moai that were taken from Rapa Nui by colonial agents, this Moai has little in the way of provenance beyond its journey from Tahiti, where it was procured from Norman Brander, to New Zealand. Using historical records and published research, we hope to establish where this Moai was made, keeping in mind that the Moai is far from an inert piece of stone to the Polynesians who created it, but rather an ancestral figure (tipuna) who is now far from home, wherever that happens to be.