Dale Leorke

Dale Leorke
Tampere University | UTA · Centre of Excellence in Game Culture Studies

PhD

About

26
Publications
4,725
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180
Citations
Introduction
I am currently a Senior Research Fellow at the Centre of Excellence in Game Culture Studies at Tampere University, Finland. My research examines the growing role of games and play in the cultural and economic policies of cities. My broader research interests include mobile and location-based media, smart city planning, and the intersection of cultural institutions and urban policy.

Publications

Publications (26)
Article
Full-text available
The potential for citizens to reclaim and reappropriate the physical spaces of their city has garnered a great deal of attention over the past year or so. The Occupy movement, “Arab Spring,” and various social protest movements around the world have all reinvigorated debates over the political importance of public space. These movements posit an al...
Book
Location-based games emerged in the early 2000s following the commercialisation of GPS and artistic experimentation with ‘locative media’ technologies. Location-based games are played in everyday public spaces using GPS and networked, mobile technologies to track their players’ location. This book traces the evolution of location-based gaming, from...
Book
This book outlines the various ways in which public libraries have become entangled in visions of the ‘smart city’, where densely networked, ubiquitous connectivity promises urban prosperity built on efficiency, innovation and new avenues for civic participation. Drawing on theoretical analysis and interviews with library professionals, policymaker...
Article
Full-text available
Following the ‘material turn’ in media studies and a growing intersection with posthuman philosophies, theorists and practitioners in the field of ‘locative media’ have recently sought to make more explicit and visible the underlying material infrastructure and processes of location-aware technologies. These approaches, we argue, concentrate on two...
Article
Full-text available
This article examines how the process of platformisation is manifesting in videogame development. Rather than reinforcing a top-down perspective of platformisation centred on distribution platforms like app stores, we focus on often overlooked game-making tools and the independent, entrepreneurial, and fringe communities that govern and use them. W...
Chapter
Location-based games have become mainstream and have been increasingly emphasized in the academic community. However, so far, to our knowledge, no bibliometric analysis of location-based games research literature has been undertaken. We carry out an analysis of 606 publications using bibliometric analysis and text mining. The results reveal promine...
Book
This book explores what games and play can tell us about contemporary processes of urbanization and examines how the dynamics of gaming can help us understand the interurban competition that underpins the entrepreneurialism of the smart and creative city. Games and Play in the Creative, Smart and Ecological City is a collection of chapters written...
Article
The authors use the location-based, augmented-reality game Wayfinder Live,which one of them designed, as a case study to analyze urban play. Acknowledging the difficulty of defining urban play, they expand existing approachesto the topic by drawing on current theories about interfaces, assemblages,and coding in such fields as media and cultural stu...
Chapter
Full-text available
Regional and local governments have long recognised the potential for films, television shows, novels and other media texts that are set in their city or country to attract tourists. Although there is a wealth of scholarship on how real-world locales are represented in digital games, scholars have to date largely overlooked the potential for videog...
Chapter
This chapter provides a critical overview of the creative city agenda and how games, play and playfulness more broadly contribute to its objectives. I argue this is tied to the growing imperative for citizens and urban policymakers alike to ‘be playful’ in order to thrive in the new economy premised on the economic and spatial reconfiguration of ci...
Article
Full-text available
In 2017, the State Library of Victoria commenced Vision 2020, an AU$88.1 million redevelopment that aims to transition the established 19th century Library into the digital era. Over four years, the Library’s physical spaces, provision of services, organizational structure, and the way it is experienced by users were reimagined and reshaped. Like m...
Chapter
Full-text available
This chapter examines the growing intersection of digital games and the ‘smart city’ model. It explores the various ways that games and playful practices can alternately support, challenge, or counter the push to instrumentalise, optimise, and ‘program’ the city through ubiquitous smart technologies and ‘sentient’ infrastructure. I begin with a bri...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
As the first location-based augmented reality game to gain mainstream popularity, Pokémon GO also reached an older demographic of players that have traditionally played less and whose play experiences are under-researched. In this article, we present the findings of a qualitative survey study (n=349) focusing on the middle-aged (40–65-year-old) Pok...
Chapter
Pokémon GO was the first location-based augmented reality game to reach mainstream popularity. We present a qualitative survey study (n = 2611) focusing on the Pokémon GO players’ memorable experiences from the time when the game’s popularity was at its peak and the experiences were fresh in players’ minds. We analyzed the open-ended written respon...
Article
Full-text available
Location-based games use smartphones and other location-aware devices to incorporate their players’ actions in everyday, physical spaces – the streets and public spaces of the city – into the virtual world of the game. Scholars and designers of these games often claim that they reconfigure their players’ relationship with the people and environment...
Article
Despite a surging interest in and uptake of solo board gaming, scarcely any attention has been paid in the scholarly literature to it – either in its traditional analog form, or in the many digital offshoots designed for mobile, game consoles or PC. This article redresses this oversight in the literature on board games through an exploratory study...
Article
Full-text available
Ben Russell's headmap manifesto (1999) is an early and highly influential example of the discourse around commercial location-aware technologies that accompanied their emergence at the turn of the last century. Although numerous theorists acknowledge its influence on the fields of urban computing and locative media art, there have been few close an...
Chapter
Full-text available
In this chapter I examine the theory around location-based games in the context of the emerging "app economy" and the growing commercialization of locative media taking place with the success of the iPhone and Android platforms. I argue that the proliferation of these devices signals a shift in location- based gaming, from its avant-garde origins i...
Article
Full-text available
This interview with Elden was conducted on 4 March, 2014. It was recorded in Melbourne while Elden was visiting Monash University as part of the Monash-Warwick alliance, on the same day he gave a lecture on Foucault’s La Société punitive at Melbourne University. The interview begins with a discussion of Elden's approach to researching, reading and...
Article
Full-text available
Historically, the play of digital games in public was restricted to certain locations such as arcades and cybercafés. The proliferation of personal, mobile, and digitally networked devices, however, has contributed to the ubiquity of digital games in contemporary culture, making them available for play anywhere, any time. This paper uses two exampl...
Article
Full-text available
The city has long been evoked as an environment for critiquing traditional paradigms of place, space and urban dwelling. This article engages with two related forms of urban mediation that arose during the late twentieth century in response to the proliferation of networked, mobile and location-aware technologies: locative media art and digital map...
Article
Full-text available
This article provides a critical account of Bogost and Montfort’s Platform Studies series, established in 2009 with their book Racing the Beam: The Atari Video Computer System which aims to ‘promote the investigation of underlying computer systems and how they enable, constrain, shape, and support the creative work that is done on them’. The articl...
Article
Full-text available
Digital media studies has developed something of a fascination with the potential for users to rework the architecture of digital technologies for the purposes of creativity. In 2004 there was McKenzie Wark’s A Hacker Manifesto, whose ‘hacker class’ appear as the primary resistance against intellectual property control and its apologists in the mas...

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Projects

Projects (5)
Project
This project explores the phenomenon of urban play: what it is, how to define it, and what its social, cultural, economic and health-related impacts are. This project also encompasses my work on the intersection between games, play and urban policy discourses - how cities are funding urban play initiatives and what their contribution to cities are.
Project
This project explores the intersection between public libraries and urban planning and policy, particularly fthrough the funding of public libraries through 'smart city' initiatives and its impact on library workers and users.
Project
The locative media movement emerged in the early 2000s, and the term describes a particular approach to using location-aware technologies that recognises their potential to reinvigorate people's engagement with place. Although the term is less common now, I'm interested in its history and ongoing application in artistic and academic practice.