Dagmar Frisch

Dagmar Frisch
Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries | IGB · Department of Ecosystem Research

Dr. rer. nat.

About

64
Publications
12,617
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Introduction
I am an evolutionary ecologist. My research interests focus on the effects of historic and present day environmental change in aquatic ecosystems. I use ancient DNA isolated from individual propagules buried in aquatic sediments over centuries to study variation in whole nuclear and mitochondrial genomes in relationship to environmental conditions. To link genotypic with phenotypic changes in resurrected and extant isolates related to global change, I apply a multidisciplinary approach that integrates concepts from the fields of environmental genomics, paleoecology, and eco-physiology. Results of my work contribute to the predictive modelling of biodiversity at the levels of the individual, populations and communities.
Additional affiliations
September 2021 - present
Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries
Position
  • Senior Researcher
July 2017 - present
University of Birmingham
Position
  • Researcher

Publications

Publications (64)
Article
Full-text available
ABSTRACT: Copepods outnumber every other multicellular animal group. They are critical components of the world's freshwater and marine ecosystems, sensitive indicators of local and global climate change, key ecosystem service providers, parasites and predators of economically important aquatic animals and potential vectors of waterborne disease. Co...
Article
For an accurate assessment of the anthropogenic impacts on evolutionary change in natural populations, we need long-term environmental, genetic and phenotypic data that predate human disturbances. Analysis of c. 1600 years of history chronicled in the sediments of South Center Lake, Minnesota, USA, revealed major environmental changes beginning c....
Article
Knowledge of the molecular basis of phenotypic responses to environmental cues is key to understanding the process of adaptation. Insights to adaptation at an evolutionary time scale can be gained by observing organismal responses before and after a shift in environmental conditions, but such observations can rarely be made. Using the ecological an...
Article
Full-text available
DNA can be preserved in marine and freshwater sediments both in bulk sediment and in intact, viable resting stages. Here, we assess the potential for combined use of ancient, environmental, DNA and timeseries of resurrected long-term dormant organisms, to reconstruct trophic interactions and evolutionary adaptation to changing environments. These n...
Article
Full-text available
Climate and environmental condition drive biodiversity at many levels of biological organization, from populations to ecosystems. Combined with paleoecological reconstructions, palaeogenetic information on resident populations provides novel insights into evolutionary trajectories and genetic diversity driven by environmental variability. While tem...
Article
Full-text available
Whole genome sequencing is instrumental for the study of genome variation in natural populations, delivering important knowledge on genomic modifications and potential targets of natural selection at the population level. Large dormant eggbanks of aquatic invertebrates such as the keystone herbivore Daphnia, a microcrustacean widespread in freshwat...
Article
Full-text available
The cover image is based on the Original Article Brine chemistry matters: isolation by environment and by distance explain population genetic structure of Artemia franciscana in saline lakes, by Dagmar Frisch et al. https://doi.org/10.1111/fwb.13737.
Article
Full-text available
• The American brine shrimp Artemia franciscana is important in aquaculture and has become invasive in other continents, aided by dispersal via waterbirds. However, little is known about processes underlying its genetic diversity and population structure in its natural habitat in North America. These processes, including dispersal and local adaptat...
Preprint
Full-text available
Whole genome sequencing is instrumental for the study of genome variation in natural populations, delivering important knowledge on genomic modifications and potential targets of natural selection at the population level. Large dormant eggbanks of aquatic invertebrates such as the keystone herbivore Daphnia, a microcrustacean widespread in freshwat...
Preprint
Full-text available
Climate and environmental condition drive biodiversity at many levels of biological organisation, from populations to ecosystems. Combined with palaeoecological reconstructions, palaeogenetic information on resident populations provides novel insights into evolutionary trajectories and genetic diversity driven by environmental variability. While te...
Preprint
Full-text available
Cultural eutrophication is one of the largest threats to aquatic ecosystems with devastating ecological and economic consequences. Although Daphnia, a keystone grazer crustacean, can mitigate some negative effects of eutrophication in freshwater habitats, it is itself affected by changes in nutrient composition. Previous studies have shown evolutio...
Article
Full-text available
The high Arctic, including the Svalbard archipelago in the North Atlantic, has been exposed to direct and indirect drivers of climatic change such as rising temperatures and associated changes in hydrology and nutrient fluxes. In addition, the number of migrating birds, particularly geese, increased remarkably in the Svalbard archipelago during the...
Article
1. The high Arctic, including the Svalbard archipelago in the North Atlantic, has been exposed to direct and indirect drivers of climatic change such as rising temperatures and associated changes in hydrology and nutrient fluxes. In addition, the number of migrating birds, particularly geese, increased remarkably in the Svalbard archipelago during...
Article
Full-text available
Paleolimnologists have utilized lake sediment records to understand historical lake and landscape development, timing and magnitude of environmental change at lake, watershed, regional and global scales, and as historical datasets to target watershed and lake management. Resurrection ecologists have long recognized lake sediments as sources of viab...
Article
Full-text available
This perspective provides an overview to the Special Issue on Resurrection Ecology (RE). It summarizes the contributions to this Special Issue, and provides background information and future prospects for the use of RE in both basic and applied evolutionary studies.
Conference Paper
In floodplains, the distribution of habitat patches is directly influenced by the spatial configuration of the landscape, along with the fluctuating disturbance regime. Two distinct habitats, characterized by water permanence, are found within the floodplain: permanent and temporary waterbodies. These habitats can be grouped into environmentally un...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding the colonisation process in zooplankton is crucial for successful restoration of aquatic ecosystems. Here, we analyzed the clonal and genetic structure of the cyclical parthenogenetic rotifer Brachionus plicatilis by following populations established in new temporary ponds during the first three hydroperiods. Rotifer populations estab...
Article
Understanding the evolutionary consequences of the Green Revolution, particularly in wild populations, is an important frontier in contemporary biology. Because human impacts have occurred at varying magnitudes or time periods depending on the study ecosystem, evolutionary histories may vary considerably among populations. Paleogenetics in conjunct...
Conference Paper
In natural systems, evolutionary adaptation to environmental change can be studied using ‘resurrection ecology’ in which dormant propagules from historic populations are revived, subjected to experimental work and compared to modern-day individuals. Studies that establish a link between transcriptomic and phenotypic data of such resurrected isolate...
Article
Ploidy affects the amount of DNA per cell. Because phosphorus (P) is required for building DNA, polyploids should have higher P content and be more sensitive to dietary P limitation. Such differences could be due to some combination of differential incorporation and excretion of P. We tested these predictions using diploids and polyploids of the zo...
Article
Full-text available
A laboratory microcosm experiment was conducted to examine the roles of food quantity and food quality on the competitive abilities of clones of the keystone aquatic zooplankter, Daphnia pulicaria. Using methods of resurrection ecology, clones were established by hatching dormant eggs from sediment layers of a lake (South Center, MN, U.S.A) that we...
Article
Little is known about the role of transcriptomic changes in driving phenotypic evolution in natural populations, particularly in response to anthropogenic environmental change. Previous analyses of Daphnia genotypes separated by centuries of evolution in a lake using methods in resurrection ecology revealed striking genetic and phenotypic shifts th...
Conference Paper
The fields of Palaeogenetics and Palaeogenomics focus on the reconstruction of ancient populations and the study of individual genomes, using ancient DNA extracted from fossils or subfossil remains. In conjunction with approaches that employ the theory and methodology of palaeoclimatology, we can obtain detailed information on the environmental his...
Article
Full-text available
Given their abundance and migratory behavior, waterbirds have major potential for dispersing plants and invertebrates within North America, yet their role as vectors remains poorly understood. We investigated the numbers and types of invertebrates and seeds within freshly collected faecal samples (n=22) of migratory dabbling ducks and shorebirds in...
Article
Full-text available
The magnitude of community-wide dispersal is central to metacommunity models, yet dispersal is notoriously difficult to quantify in passive and cryptic dispersers such as many freshwater invertebrates. By overcoming the problem of quantifying dispersal rates, colonization rates into new habitats can provide a useful estimate of the magnitude of eff...
Data
Magnified areas of the aerial photograph in Fig. S1 that illustrate the categorical classes used to describe the variable “degree of connection” (0 = not connected, 1 = weak connection to small flooded area just outside pond, 2 = connected to shallow roadside ditch, 3 = connected to large flooded area). Note: class 0 not shown. (TIF)
Data
Colonization rates of cladocerans measured in the sampled experimental and reference ponds throughout the study period. Each colored line represents the colonization rate for an individual pond. Colonization rates (calculated as cumulative species richness per pond for all sample dates) were calculated for the number of days a given pond was inunda...
Data
Colonization rates of three zooplankton taxa combined (copepods, cladocerans, rotifers) measured in the sampled experimental and reference ponds throughout the study period. Each colored line represents the colonization rate for an individual pond. Colonization rates (calculated as cumulative species richness per pond for all sample dates) were cal...
Data
Aerial photograph of the northern pond cluster in February 2006. Sampled ponds are labelled. Red circles denote the location of ponds that overspilled and were connected to an adjacent flooded area. Photo credit: Hector Garrido/EBD-CSIC. (TIF)
Data
Colonization rates of copepods measured in the sampled experimental and reference ponds throughout the study period. Each colored line represents the colonization rate for an individual pond. Colonization rates (calculated as cumulative species richness per pond for all sample dates) were calculated for the number of days a given pond was inundated...
Data
This figure shows the potential spatial relationships between the different experimental pools. We computed Principal Coordinates of Neighbour Matrices (PCNM) or classical distance-based Moran’s Eigenvector Maps (Borcard et al. 2011) based on their geographic locations. The first row shows PCNM1-PCNM5, the second row PCNM6-PCNM10, etc. Each plot sh...
Data
Colonization rates of rotifers measured in the sampled experimental and reference ponds throughout the study period. Each colored line represents the colonization rate for an individual pond. Colonization rates (calculated as cumulative species richness per pond for all sample dates) were calculated for the number of days a given pond was inundated...
Data
Species list with frequency of occurrence in experimental ponds (Exp) and reference ponds (Ref) in the respective samples months. Shaded lines show the number of species for copepods, cladocerans and rotifers encountered in experimental and reference ponds. (TIF)
Data
Means and SD of environmental variables measured in the sampled experimental (exp.) and reference (ref.) ponds throughout the study period. A MANOVA performed on all listed variables, using pond type as independent variables was significant (Wilks 0.559, F7,182 = 20.49, p<0.001). Significant differences between ponds were only detected for DO (diss...
Article
Full-text available
Daphnia lumholtzi is a planktonic crustacean native to subtropical regions in Africa, Asia and Australia. Since its invasion to the southern USA in ~1990 it has spread across North America as far north as the Laurentian Great Lakes. We assessed invasion history using microsatellite makers and to explore the influence of mean annual temperature on t...
Article
Full-text available
We investigated the phylogeography of the main lineages in the tadpole shrimp Triops mauritanicus Ghigi in the south-western Iberian Peninsula, using mitochondrial 12S and 16S rDNA sequences. Our results indicate that a fourth, hitherto unknown main phylogenetic lineage occurs in Iberia, so that in total, the species is divided into six distinct cl...
Article
Full-text available
Over 30years after drainage for agriculture, a 2700ha temporary marshland was recently restored in Doñana National Park. We describe the recovery of zooplankton communities (copepods, cladocerans and rotifers) in 47 new temporary ponds excavated as part of the restoration project during the first two hydroperiods (April 2006 and 2007), and compare...
Article
1. We examined the ecological genetics of the invasive cladoceran Daphnia lumholtzi in a reservoir (Lake Texoma) in the southern USA. This species originates from the Old World subtropics and has spread across North America since the late 1980s after its inadvertent introduction to a reservoir in northeastern Texas. 2. The population genetic struct...
Article
Full-text available
Population genetic surveys approximately 25 years apart examined the distribution and abundance of asexual clones of the freshwater zooplankter Daphnia pulex complex in rock pools near Churchill, Manitoba, Canada. In 1984-1985, melanic members of this species complex were present in 131 rock pools at this site, but were only detected in 90 of these...
Article
Full-text available
The copepods outnumber, in terms of individual animals, every other group of multicellular animals on earth, including insects and nematode worms, and are critical components of the world’s freshwater and marine ecosystems (Hardy 1970). Copepods are also vectors of human diseases such as cholera and can be major pathogens of wild and farmed aquatic...
Article
Full-text available
The viable propagule banks of a temporary stream were studied from sections with different agricultural history. Hatching of zooplankton (copepods, rotifers and cladocerans) was recorded in the laboratory under controlled temperature and light conditions from an agriculturally modified area with average hydroperiods of about a week per year and two...
Article
Full-text available
Speculation about the role of waterbirds in the dispersal of aquatic invertebrates pre-dates Darwin. However, there is a critical shortage of field studies quantifying such dispersal. We quantified the viability of aquatic invertebrates in the faeces of different waterfowl species collected in the field at different times during winter. Faeces were...
Article
Full-text available
The sequence in which new colonists reach an empty habitat can be crucial for future development and species structure of communities. It is therefore important to assess species composition and abundance in the initial stages of habitat existence. In the present study we focussed on colonization of newly constructed temporary ponds in Dohana, Sout...
Article
Full-text available
1.During a study of five artificial brackish ponds situated in Doñana Natural Park and the Guadalquivir delta between July 2001 and June 2002, a total of six copepod species (two calanoids, three cyclopoids and one harpacticoid) were recorded. All of them are typical of brackish or estuarine habitats.2.The estuarine calanoid copepod Acartia tonsa (...
Article
Full-text available
Twenty-five sites located in five wetland zones within Doñana, south-west Spain were studied for copepod and cladoceran species richness and composition in relation to habitat characteristics from January to March 2004. The γ-diversity of copepods and cladocerans combined varied between wetland zones, which differed significantly in conductivity, s...
Article
Zooplankton in temporary ponds is often collected with gear originally designed for lakes, and mostly unsuitable for sampling shallow habitats. We describe a new simple and inexpensive device for sampling zooplankton in very shallow, vegetated temporary ponds. We tested the sampling efficiency by comparing species composition and density of cyclopo...
Article
1. We explored the quantitative contribution of two alternative recolonisation strategies by a combination of experimental and field data from the Little Tallahatchie floodplain (Mississippi, U.S.A.). In this area, several floods of short duration occur in winter and spring. During floods, lentic and lotic waterbodies of different size are connecte...
Article
Full-text available
We examined the impact of lateral and longitudinal hydrological connectivity on copepod diversity (local species richness, diapause strategies and population genetics) in ponds of a North American floodplain. Results of a General Linear Model (GLM) which included three environmental pond variables showed that species richness in these ponds was sig...
Article
Full-text available
Temporary-pond species can be expected to use environmental cues to predict the onset of adverse conditions, while permanent-pond species may be insensitive to such cues. Temperature is such a potential cue in temporary waterbodies, as it fluctuates more widely with decreasing pond size than in deeper permanent ponds. We compared the temperature-in...
Article
1. We explored the quantitative contribution of two alternative recolonisation strategies by a combination of experimental and field data from the Little Tallahatchie floodplain (Mississippi, U.S.A.). In this area, several floods of short duration occur in winter and spring. During floods, lentic and lotic waterbodies of different size are connecte...
Article
1. The survival of cyclopoid copepods was investigated in a floodplain for 2 years where flooding occurred during the cold season. The cyclopoid community was studied in three waterbodies with distinct hydroperiods: a permanent pond connected to the flooded area during inundation, a temporary pool that is part of the flooded area and an isolated te...
Chapter
Full-text available
Life cycles of the freshwater cyclopoids Cyclops strenuus Fischer and Cyclops insignis Claus are described from populations of one permanent and two temporary waters in a floodplain area. The abundance of these two species was studied in detail, with special regard to instars surviving summer drought. Both species coexist in two locations during th...

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Projects (2)
Project
Evolutionary adaptations to environmental change involve structural modifications of the genome as well of the epigenome, with the current view that epigenetic evolution precedes sequence adaptation. Recent methodological advances have allowed the study of epigenetic signatures from ancient DNA, shedding light on the putative role of epigenetics (methylation) in evolution by inferring gene regulation from high-quality DNA ofextinct organisms. Methylation patterns of the water flea Daphnia (Crustacea) have been studied in extant individuals using Whole Genome Bisulfite Sequencing (WGBS). To study the epigenetic memory throughout centuries in asexual Arctic Daphnia strains, we apply a modified, but novel WGBS approach using DNA from the animals' natural archives – their dormant eggs. The Objectives are (1) to develop a methodology to detect genomic evolutionary change using a detailed analysis of genomic sequences and methylation signatures, and (2) to assess variation of methylation in genetically identical clones across centuries, and its relationship with climate change in the Arctic. (funded as pilot study NBAF998 by NERC, UK).
Project
PALECOEVOL is a highly multidisciplinary study combining population genomics with paleoecology, and is firmly embedded in the theoretical framework of evolutionary ecology. This transformative research is based on the direct observation of evolution in the past 2000 years in the highly endangered Arctic environment. By recording population genomic parameters before and after environmental shifts, a pioneering dataset unprecedented in genomic detail will be supplied and rigorously combined with historic environmental data. The overarching goal is to study, across millennia, the genomic responses of the ecological and genomic model organism Daphnia, an aquatic keystone herbivore, to repeated shifts in temperature and related environmental parameters, and to lay the foundation for establishing a novel model system to study the effects of environmental change at the population level.