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Cynthia A. Golembeski

Cynthia A. Golembeski
The New School · Milano School of International Affairs, Management, and Urban Policy

MPH
RWJF Health Policy Research Scholar affiliated with The New School Institute on Race, Power, and Political Economy.

About

43
Publications
3,178
Reads
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310
Citations
Citations since 2016
28 Research Items
156 Citations
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Introduction
I use mixed methods to analyze how policy, law, ethics, and management operate at the nexus of criminal legal and health systems. Related research assesses social safety net policies as determinants of heaIth and safety. I collaborate on criminal legal and health research and policy initiatives. I serve on the editorial boards of Journal of Correctional Health Care, Public Integrity, World Medical & Health Policy, and AJPM Focus. I was a Fulbright grantee and USAID fellow in South Africa.

Publications

Publications (43)
Article
Full-text available
The U.S. criminal legal system contributes to the oppression and harm of marginalized groups, calling into question ethical governance. The front end of this system, specifically bail and pretrial justice, exploits opportunities for resource generation and social control as a major driver of incarceration, yet receives limited attention in public a...
Article
This article examined the factors associated with thoughts of ending life in a sample of incarcerated men. Data were obtained from the Cancer Risk in Incarcerated Men Study, a pilot study designed to examine cancer health disparities and cancer health education in a racially/ethnically diverse sample of male smokers in three state prisons in the no...
Article
Full-text available
Thinking Like an Economist: How Efficiency Replaced Equality in U.S. Public Policy is critical reading for policymakers, practitioners, and scholars interested in governance, political economy, ethics, equity, and the origins and influence of the ‘economic style of reasoning’ on federal policymaking and corresponding values and priorities. Elizabet...
Poster
Full-text available
Robert Wood Johnson Foundation funds research undertaken by Matthew Bakko and Cynthia Golembeski examining how philanthropic actors, grant recipients, and attendant funding trajectories inform pretrial and bail policy and reform.
Article
Full-text available
The COVID-19 pandemic has heightened and exposed existing health vulnerabilities and the race and class disproportionalities associated with health, economic, and social resource access. COVID-19 has revealed the depths to which inequities are entrenched in our everyday lives and local, national, and global structures. Negative health effects and h...
Article
Full-text available
The targeted use of standardized outcome measures (SOMs) of mental health in research with older adults who are incarcerated promotes a common language that enables interdisciplinary dialogue, contributes to the identification of disparities and supports data harmonization and subsequent synthesis. This paper aims to provide researchers with ration...
Article
Public administration scholars have interrogated ethical governance and accountability in association with federal oversight amidst notorious crises and disasters (e.g., the 1990s financial crisis; the Challenger disaster; Hurricane Katrina; Abu Ghraib; and the Flint, Michigan water crisis) (see Balfour et al., 2014; Khademian, 2011; Lewis, 2010; R...
Article
Full-text available
The United States has approximately 5 percent of the world's population but incarcerates nearly 25 percent of the world's incarcerated population and produces nearly 25 percent of global carbon dioxide emissions to date. Climate change and hyperincarceration are causes and consequences of structural racism and economic deprivation, which disproport...
Article
Misinformation amplified by political elites can lead to an increase in racism and discrimination against racial and ethnic minorities and other populations who experience vulnerabilities. Politically-motivated misinformation, as observed during the COVID-19 pandemic, can have far-ranging public health consequences, including negative physical and...
Article
Full-text available
Bipartisan governmental representatives and the public support investment in health care, housing, education, and nutrition programs, plus resources for people leaving prison and jail (Halpin, 2018; Johnson & Beletsky, 2020; USCCR, 2019). The Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996 banned people with felony drug conv...
Conference Paper
Public management research often precludes more meaningful understanding of criminal-justice involved men and women within the contexts of policy cycles and citizen-state interactions, which include frontline corrections and healthcare staff. Moynihan posits that uncovering the construction, nature, and impacts of administrative burdens, including...
Article
Full-text available
Misinformation amplified by political elites can lead to an increase in racism and discrimination against racial and ethnic minorities and other populations who experience vulnerabilities. Politically-motivated misinformation, as observed during the COVID-19 pandemic, can have far-ranging public health consequences, including negative physical and...
Preprint
The United States has approximately 5% of the world’s population but incarcerates nearly 25% of the world’s incarcerated population and produces nearly 25% of global carbon dioxide emissions to date. Climate change and hyperincarceration are causes and consequences of structural racism and economic deprivation, which disproportionately affect lower...
Conference Paper
Foundations promote causes and support policy reform. Philanthropic support has enabled research and policy institutes to increase awareness of the effects of mass incarceration within the U.S. Bushouse and Mosley (2018) suggest the role of philanthropic foundations in the policy process is largely hidden and thus, poorly conceptualized. Limited wo...
Preprint
Full-text available
Bipartisan governmental representatives and the U.S. public overwhelmingly support investment in economic security, including healthcare, housing, education, and nutrition programs, plus resources for people leaving prison and jail. One component of the 1996 Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Act (PROWRA) was a lifetime ban on people with...
Article
Full-text available
More than 1,000,000 women in the U.S. are currently under supervision of the criminal legal system (CLS). Since 1980, the number of women in prison has increased by over 800%. CLS involvement increases risk of physical and sexual violence, with direct or indirect health and health care effects, which impact families and communities. These risks are...
Conference Paper
We analyze panel data examining state-level firearm preemption laws in 50 states. States have long had the capacity and authority to preempt local ordinances. Earlier state preemption efforts targeted gun and smoking regulations in response to local public health advocacy throughout the 1980s and 1990s (Pomeranz et al. 2017; Briffault 2018). Nearly...
Conference Paper
Our analysis relies on a comprehensive dataset of 19 years of state preemption activity related to workers’ rights across 15 labor policy subjects. What is the association between less diverse state-level governments and state preemption of local workers’ rights? Are republican controlled state-level governments more likely to adopt preemption meas...
Article
Main Streets are civic/commercial centers of neighborhoods. They are also nodes in regional networks of streets, which together create a net of connection referred to here as the ‘tangle.’ This tangle serves as a physical substrate for community interconnection and its expression as collective efficacy. We examine two regions hit by disaster. We po...
Article
Full-text available
In Life and Death in Rikers Island, Homer Venters, the former chief medical officer for New York City’s jails, performs a social autopsy of the “inaccessible island colony of nine jails on Rikers Island” and reveals the “deadly and long-lasting health risks of jail” (p. ix). Three decades of mass incarceration in the United States coincide with a s...
Conference Paper
Compelling evidence suggests the conditions of incarceration lead to poor health outcomes because of, for example, poor nutrition and diet, elevated risks of sexual assault or other violence, and the mental health repercussions of both crowding and prolonged isolation. Issues of dual loyalty on the part of health care providers, confidentiality, ab...
Article
The combination of the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (UMDNJ) and Rutgers University in 2013 is the largest higher education merger in U.S. history. Based on extensive interviews with participants and archival research, we analyze factors that accelerated or decelerated the integration of the two universities over the period 201...
Article
The major universities offering health sciences education in New Jersey were restructured in a 2012 legislative act. The plan evolved from a limited transfer of one medical school to a complete integration of two large entities. We describe how this evolution occurred and how leaders of the combined organization implemented the plan, especially con...
Technical Report
Full-text available
The goal of Fortune Society’s Reentry Education Project (REP) is to help healthcare providers integrate culturally competent best practices into the HIV prevention, treatment and care, which they deliver to patients who are justice-involved and formerly incarcerated. Guided by input from public health experts, those affected by crime and incarcerat...
Article
Purpose: There is a need for research to facilitate the widespread implementation, dissemination and sustained utilization of evidence-based primary care screening, monitoring and care coordination guidelines, thereby increasing the impact of dental hygienists' actions on patients' oral and general health. The aims of this formative study are to e...
Chapter
Anti-Defamation League, originally Anti-Defamation League of B’nai B’rith, advocacy organization established in Chicago in 1913 to fight anti-Semitism and other forms of bigotry and discrimination. Its activities include assessing hate crimes and anti-Semitism in various countries, assisting law-enforcement agencies in investigating and prosecuting...
Article
Objectives. We explored the interrelationships among diabetes, hypertension, and missing teeth among underserved racial/ethnic minority elders. Methods. Self-reported sociodemographic characteristics and information about health and health care were provided by community-dwelling ElderSmile participants, aged 50 years and older, who took part in c...
Conference Paper
Introduction: The goal of this project was to develop a web-based clinical decision support system (CDSS) for screening and care coordination by dental hygienists at chairside for four general health issues (diabetes, hypertension, tobacco use and nutrition counseling) to improve patient health. Methods: We modified a smoking cessation CDSS desig...
Conference Paper
Objectives: The objectives are: (1) to explore the interrelationships among diabetes, hypertension, and missing teeth among underserved racial/ethnic minority elders; and (2) to assess whether or not an ordinal logit model that utilizes ordered response categories for missing teeth is more informative and interpretable, as compared to a binary logi...
Conference Paper
Research Aims:(1) To assess dental hygienists’ and dentists’ perspectives and experiences regarding current scope of practice and the integration of primary care activities with routine dental care; and (2) to assess the needs of hygienists and the office environment around primary care screening at chairside. Methods:This exploratory qualitative...
Chapter
Intimate partner violence (IPV) seriously compromises the short- and long-term health and well-being of women who experience it, of those who perpetrate it, and of children who witness it. Although violence against women has gained increasing recognition as a human rights issue, IPV often remains hidden, stigmatized, underrecognized, and underrepor...
Article
As trusted leaders, the message you send has a huge impact on your communities and on our country. You can use your voice-and your expertise-as public health leaders to educate your families, friends and patients about what is really at stake… . I'd encourage you to move outside the public health world to galvanize other leaders in your community-f...
Conference Paper
Aim: To explore the role of gendered norms and expectations regarding the nature and dynamics of coercive and violent behavior within young Latino adult heterosexual relationships, whereby men and women experience violence as perpetrator, victim or both. Methods: 254 heterosexual, Latino 18-24 year old adults were screened with questionnaires. 37...
Chapter
The largest non-Middle Eastern oil- exporting countries include Venezuela, Nigeria, Indonesia, Libya, Algeria, Ecuador and Gabon. New technologies and rising prices have increased the volume of offshore oil extraction, resulting in areas such as the Gulf of Guinea off Africa emerging as a major global hydrocarbon supplier. However, Bergesen and Hau...
Article
Full-text available
The American system of prisons and prisoners-described by its critics as the prison-industrial complex-has grown rapidly since 1970. Increasingly punitive sentencing guidelines and the privatization of prison-related industries and services account for much of this growth. Those who enter and leave this system are increasingly Black or Latino, poor...
Article
The purpose of this paper was to examine the geographic distribution of New York City adults aged 65 and older by race/ethnicity and poverty status. Also analyzed was seniors' access to dental care as defined by the location of dental providers and their proximity to the subway system lines in Manhattan and the Bronx. ArcGIS software was used to cr...
Article
Health disparities that affect whole communities may involve factors like housing quality that lie at least partly within planners' realm of policy influence. This article demonstrates a link between housing and childhood asthma. The magnitude of the childhood asthma epidemic in Harlem in New York City and the commitment of engaged community partne...
Article
The American system of prisons and prisoners—described by its critics as the prison–industrial complex—has grown rapidly since 1970. Increasingly punitive sentencing guidelines and the privatization of prison-related industries and services account for much of this growth. Those who enter and leave this system are increasingly Black or Latino, poor...
Article
Since 1980, asthma prevalence, hospitalization, and mortality have been increasing in the United States (1). Because of concern about asthma-related morbidity among children in Central Harlem, New York City (NYC), the Harlem Children's Zone Asthma Initiative (HCZAI) was established in 2001 to reduce asthma-related morbidity through improved surveil...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
Robert Wood Johnson Foundation supports current Cynthia Golembeski and Matthew Bakko's research examining how philanthropic patrons inform pretrial justice and bail policy and reform. Despite a 16% decrease in jail populations from 2019, pandemic response and decarceration efforts are inadequate, while racial inequity has likely increased. Structural racism in criminal legal systems can adversely affect health through multiple pathways. Incarceration can result in jail-attributable injury, illness, and death. 80% of people in Texas county jail who died after contracting COVID were not convicted of any crimes. Pre-incarceration factors, including poverty, racism, substandard healthcare quality and access, along with jail exposure, compromise health and increase recidivism risks. Disproportionate punishment and collateral penalties associated with cash bail are causes and consequences of racism and administrative dysfunction. Many support bipartisan criminal legal reform efforts. Non-state interventions, including philanthropic reform efforts and community bail funds, seek change. Foundations promote causes and support policy reforms. How have foundations been drivers of pretrial detention and bail reform in mitigating causes and consequences of structural racism? We examine foundations’ roles and behaviors. Philanthropic funding is key to services, programming, research, and policy efforts associated with reform. Foundations’ role as quasi-state actors in policy processes is largely hidden and poorly conceptualized. Philanthropy’s role as charitable agents (services/programming) or social innovation agents (research/policy) around bail is unknown. We use an explanatory sequential mixed methods design to analyze quantitative and qualitative evidence of philanthropic actors’ motivations and perceptions regarding pretrial reform strategies, including bail funds, pretrial risk assessment, and abolition. Quantitative analysis of 20 years of data elucidates the scope and strategies of pretrial reform efforts by funders. Key variables: bail reform strategy type, grant description, and funding expenditure. Interview data analysis assesses philanthropic actors’ subjective motivations and perceptions in funding pretrial reform.