Csaba Molnar

Csaba Molnar
Magyar Nemzet · Magazin melléklet

PhD

About

13
Publications
15,269
Reads
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636
Citations
Additional affiliations
March 2008 - present
Magyar Nemzet
Position
  • science journalist
Description
  • media
September 2007 - February 2008
Eötvös Loránd University
Position
  • research accociate
March 2005 - August 2005
University of Sussex
Position
  • Marie Curie Fellowship
Education
September 2004 - August 2007
Eötvös Loránd University
Field of study
  • biology, ethology
September 1999 - July 2004
Eötvös Loránd University
Field of study
  • biology

Publications

Publications (13)
Article
Play back experiments compared the ability of children (aged 6, 8, and 10 years) and adults to discriminate dog barks recorded in three different contexts. Participants had to categorize barks according to recording context, and to characterize the inner states of dogs by relating barks to facial expression of humans. It was found that older childr...
Thesis
Full-text available
Kutatásunkban az ember és a kutya illetve a kutyák közötti akusztikus kommunikáció különböző aspektusait vizsgáltuk. A kommunikáció alapvető jellegzetességeinek megfelelően megvizsgáltuk, hogy a kutyák ugatásai eltérőek-e különböző kontextusokban és az egyes egyedek ugatásai között vannak-e hangtani különbségek. A hangot érzékelő "vevő" vizsgálata...
Thesis
In my research I studied various aspects of dog-dog and dog-human acoustic communication. According to basic concept of communication I studied whether dog barks emitted in different situations and by different individuals had different acoustic traits. By studying receivers' responses I investigated if dogs and humans were able to distinguish amon...
Article
Full-text available
Prerecorded family dog (Canis familiaris) barks were played back to groups of congenitally sightless, sightless with prior visual experience, and sighted people (none of whom had ever owned a dog). We found that blind people without any previous canine visual experiences can categorize accurately various dog barks recorded in different contexts, an...
Article
Full-text available
In the present study we explored whether dogs (Canis familiaris) are able to discriminate between conspecific barks emitted in different contexts recorded either from the same or different individuals. Playback experiments were conducted with dogs using barks as stimuli in a habituation-dishabituation paradigm. Barks were recorded in two contexts (...
Article
Although it is one of the most conspicuous features of dog behaviour, barking has received little attention from ethologists or from an applied perspective. In this review, an ethological look is taken at the communicative aspect of dog barking. Emerging new research has indicated that in the repertoire of dog vocalisations barking has unique featu...
Article
Full-text available
In this study we analyzed the possible context-specific and individual-specific features of dog barks using a new machine-learning algorithm. A pool containing more than 6,000 barks, which were recorded in six different communicative situations was used as the sound sample. The algorithm's task was to learn which acoustic features of the barks, whi...
Article
We investigated if dogs can discriminate barks of another individual recorded in two markedly different situations: (a) when a stranger entered the property where the dog lived, and (b) when the dog was tethered to a tree and left alone. We used a habituation-dishabituation paradigm for testing discriminatory abilities. Three 25-s long samples of "...
Article
In this study we tested the often suggested claim that people are able to recognize their dogs by their barks. Earlier studies in other species indicated that reliable discrimination between individuals cannot be made by listening to chaotically noisy vocalizations. As barking is typically such a chaotic noisy vocalization, we have hypothesized tha...
Article
In an earlier study, we found that humans were able to categorize dog barks correctly, which were recorded in various situations. The acoustic parameters, like tonality, pitch and inter-bark time intervals, seemed to have a strong effect on how human listeners described the emotionality of these dog vocalisations. In this study, we investigated if...
Article
Full-text available
The authors investigated whether human listeners could categorize played-back dog (Canis familiaris) barks recorded in various situations and associate them with emotional ratings. Prerecorded barks of a Hungarian herding dog breed (Mudi) provided the sample. Human listeners were asked to rate emotionality of the vocalization and to categorize the...

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