Cristian Pasquaretta

Cristian Pasquaretta
French National Centre for Scientific Research | CNRS · Research Center on Animal Cognition

PhD

About

72
Publications
23,329
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
917
Citations
Additional affiliations
July 2016 - present
Paul Sabatier University - Toulouse III
Position
  • PostDoc Position
May 2013 - October 2015
Institut Pluridisciplinaire Hubert Curien
Position
  • PostDoc Position
October 2009 - October 2011
University of Pavia
Position
  • PostDoc Position

Publications

Publications (72)
Article
Full-text available
Extrinsic and intrinsic factors may influence the activity budget of wild animals, resulting in a variation in the time spent in different activities among populations or individuals of the same species. In this study, we examined how extrinsic and intrinsic factors affect the behaviour of the alpine marmot (Marmota marmota), a hibernating social r...
Preprint
Full-text available
Environmental stressors have sublethal consequences on animals, often affecting the mean of phenotypic traits in a population. However, potential effects on variance are poorly understood. Since phenotypic variance is the basis for adaptation, any influence of stressors may have important implications for population resilience. Here we explored thi...
Preprint
Full-text available
Animal social network analyses (ASNA) have led to a foundational shift in our understanding of animal sociality that transcends the disciplinary boundaries of genetics, spatial movements, epidemiology, information transmission, evolution, species assemblages and conservation. However, some analytical protocols (i.e., permutation tests) used in ASNA...
Article
Full-text available
The automated quantification of the behaviour of freely moving animals is increasingly needed in applied ethology. State-of-the-art approaches often require tags to identify animals, high computational power for data collection and processing, and are sensitive to environmental conditions, which limits their large-scale utilization, for instance in...
Article
Full-text available
Long-range signaling, such as acoustic communication, is best understood within the broader context of all potential receivers. Exactly what kind of information is transmitted or obtained is a matter of debate. To address this issue, we describe the communication network of a population of wild siamangs (Symphalangus syndactylus), small territorial...
Article
Full-text available
Central place foraging pollinators tend to develop multi-destination routes (traplines) to exploit patchily distributed plant resources. While the formation of traplines by individual pollinators has been studied in detail, how populations of foragers use resources in a common area is an open question, difficult to address experimentally. We explor...
Article
Full-text available
Pollutants can have severe detrimental effects on insects, even at sublethal doses, damaging developmental and cognitive processes involved in crucial behaviours. Agrochemicals have been identified as important causes of pollinator declines, but the impacts of other anthropogenic compounds, such as metallic trace elements in soils and waters, have...
Article
Full-text available
Parasites alter the physiology and behaviour of their hosts. In domestic honey bees, the microsporidia Nosema ceranae induces energetic stress that impairs the behaviour of foragers, potentially leading to colony collapse. Whether this parasite similarly affects wild pollinators is little understood because of the low success rates of experimental...
Preprint
Full-text available
Parasites alter the physiology and behaviour of their hosts. In domestic honey bees, the microsporidia Nosema ceranae induces an energetic stress and impairs the behaviour of foragers, potentially leading to colony collapse. Whether this emerging parasite similarly affects wild pollinators is little understood because of the low success rates of ex...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding how animal movements change across space and time is a fundamental question in ecology. While classical analyses of trajectories give insightful descriptors of spatial patterns, a satisfying method for assessing the temporal succession of such patterns is lacking. Network analyses are increasingly used to capture properties of complex...
Article
Full-text available
Animals have evolved foraging strategies to acquire blends of nutrients that maximize fitness traits. In social insects, nutrient regulation is complicated by the fact that few individuals, the foragers, must address the divergent nutritional needs of all colony members simultaneously, including other workers, the reproductives, and the brood. Here...
Article
Full-text available
Honey bee foragers must supply their colony with a balance of pollen and nectar to sustain optimal colony development. Inter-individual behavioural variability among foragers is observed in terms of activity levels and nectar vs. pollen collection, however the causes of such variation are still open questions. Here we explored the relationship betw...
Article
Full-text available
Background Individual bees exhibit complex movement patterns to efficiently exploit small areas within larger plant populations. How such individual spatial behaviours scale up to the collective level, when several foragers visit a common area, has remained challenging to investigate, both because of the low resolution of field movement data and th...
Chapter
Over the past decades, research on insect cognition has made considerable advances in describing the ability of model species (in particular bees and fruit flies) to achieve cognitive tasks once thought to be unique to vertebrates, and investigating how these may be implemented in a miniature brain. While this lab-based research is critical to unde...
Article
Full-text available
Microbes influence a wide range of host social behaviors and vice versa. So far, however, the mechanisms underpinning these complex interactions remain poorly understood. In social animals, where individuals share microbes and interact around foods, the gut microbiota may have considerable consequences on host social interactions by acting upon the...
Article
Bipartite ecological networks are increasingly used to describe and model relationships between interacting species (e.g., plant-pollinator or host parasite). Here, we apply network methods developed in community ecology to quantify division of labor in insect societies. We consider 2 quantitative indices (d' and H 2 ') derived from information the...
Article
Full-text available
A portion of the terrestrial subsidies to lentic habitats consists of arthropods. In high mountain, originally fishless lakes, terrestrial arthropods are an important seasonal food resource for introduced fish. Here we investigate how brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis can alter the input of terrestrial arthropods in ten high mountain lakes contrast...
Article
Full-text available
Pollinators, such as bees, face the complex challenge of efficiently exploiting patchily distributed floral resources across large landscapes. 2. In the present study we consider the utility of spatial network statistics to analyse the foraging patterns of bees moving between feeding sites at various spatial and temporal scales. 3. We explain how s...
Article
Numerous studies have investigated the remarkable variation of social features and the resulting structures across species. Indeed, relationships are dynamic and vary in time according to various factors such as environmental conditions or individuals attributes. However, few studies have investigated the processes that stabilize the structures wit...
Article
Full-text available
Workers of social insects, such as bees, ants and wasps, show some degree of inter-individual variability in decision-making, learning and memory. Whether these natural cognitive differences translate into distinct adaptive behavioural strategies is virtually unknown. Here we examined variability in the movement patterns of bumblebee foragers estab...
Article
Full-text available
In a previous study (Dufour et al., 2015) we reported the unusual characteristics of the drumming performance of a chimpanzee named Barney. His sound production, several sequences of repeated drumming on an upturned plastic barrel, shared features typical for human musical drumming: it was rhythmical, decontextualized, and well controlled by the ch...
Article
Full-text available
1. The habitat requirements of a species are the resources, conditions and space required for survival and reproduction. The habitat requirements of butterflies have been well studied, but the extent to which individuals within a species and between species utilise and share the habitat is poorly known. 2. In a butterfly assemblage in northern Ital...
Article
Full-text available
Many animals have evolved strategies to reduce risks of inbreeding and its deleterious effects on the progeny. In social arthropods, such as the eusocial ants and bees, inbreeding avoidance is typically achieved by the dispersal of breeders from their native colony. However studies in presocial insects suggest that kin discrimination during mate ch...
Article
Full-text available
Group-living animals often use social information, in addition to personal sampling, to learn about foraging opportunities. Small-brained insects are no exception (Gruter and Leadbeater, 2014). For instance, inexperienced bumblebees learn to identify profitable flower species by observing conspecifics (Leadbeater and Chittka, 2005). Bumblebees are...
Article
Full-text available
Numerous studies have investigated the remarkable variation of social features and the resulting structures across species. Indeed, relationships are dynamic and vary in time according to various factors such as environmental conditions or individuals attributes. However, few studies have investigated the processes that stabilize the structures wit...
Article
Matrilineal kin groups are common in social mammals and often exhibit cooperative behaviors. Social interactions in such groups may have varying consequences on fitness depending on the number of kin present. We used social network analysis to study which factors (including individual spatial distribution, sex, age, and kinship) affected patterns o...
Article
Full-text available
Social learning – the transmission of behaviors through observation or interaction with conspecifics – can be viewed as a decision-making process driven by interactions among individuals. Animal group structures change over time and interactions among individuals occur in particular orders that may be repeated following specific patterns, change in...
Article
Full-text available
Aggregation behaviour is the tendency for animals to group together, which may have important consequences on individual fitness. We used a combination of experimental and simulation approaches to study how genetic variation and social environment interact to influence aggregation dynamics in Drosophila. To do this, we used two different natural li...
Article
Full-text available
Animals use a number of different mechanisms to acquire crucial information. During social encounters, animals can pass information from one to another but, ideally, they would only use information that benefits survival and reproduction. Therefore, individuals need to be able to determine the value of the information they receive. One cue can come...
Article
Full-text available
The successful reintroduction and restocking of the European Bison demands a reliable knowledge of the biology of this species. Yet little is known to date about the European bison, and empirical data remains insufficient to set up a reliable plan ensuring the reintroduction, maintenance and survival of populations in habitats that have been largel...
Article
Full-text available
Raptors primarily use soaring-gliding flight which exploits thermals and ridge lifts over land to reduce energetic costs. However during migration, these birds often have to cross water surfaces where thermal currents are weak; during these times, birds mainly use flapping (powered) flight which increases energy consumption and mortality risk. As a...
Article
Full-text available
Group coordination and the synchronization of activities are essential to maintain group cohesion during collective movements. Collective decisions arising from this synchronization are influenced by both ecological and sociodemographic factors. The spatial heterogeneity and temporal predictability of resources not only affect fissionefusion dynami...
Article
Full-text available
Whereas most experiments indicate that monkeys have no theory of mind, a study carried out by Wood and collaborators (2007) claimed that they can make inferences about the intentions of another individual. We applied the experimental procedure devised by these authors to investigate whether monkeys can recognize goal-directed actions. We tested 16...
Article
Full-text available
Alpine plants are considered to be particularly vulnerable to climate change and related extreme episodes, such as heat waves. Despite growing interest in the impact of heat waves on alpine plants, knowledge about their effects on regeneration is still fragmentary. Recruitment from seeds will be crucial for the successful migration and survival of...
Chapter
Full-text available
Social grooming (allogrooming) is a common feature of many animal societies, and is possibly the most commonly studied primate affiliative behaviour. Social grooming is very common among Old World monkeys, especially Cercopithecidae and Hominidae , but except Colobinae. To better understand the role of allogrooming behaviour in colobines, we attemp...
Data
Full-text available
En entendant les termes « réseaux sociaux », vous penserez probablement à Facebook ou Twitter. Dans ce livre, ce terme est évidemment à comprendre autrement. Les animaux interagissent et communiquent notamment au sujet de la nourriture et de la reproduction. Dans un milieu écologique donné, les espèces tissent des liens de compétition, d’exclusion,...
Book
Full-text available
En entendant les termes « réseaux sociaux », vous penserez probablement à Facebook ou Twitter. Dans ce livre, ce terme est évidemment à comprendre autrement. Les animaux interagissent et communiquent notamment au sujet de la nourriture et de la reproduction. Dans un milieu écologique donné, les espèces tissent des liens de compétition, d’exclusion,...
Article
Full-text available
In social mammals, territory size and shape vary according to the number and strength of neighbour individuals competing for resources. Two main theories have been proposed to explain this variability: the Group Augmentation (GA) and the realized Resource Holding Potential (rRHP) hypotheses. The first states that the outcome of the interactions amo...
Article
Full-text available
While many studies focus on how animals use public information, the dynamics of information spread and maintenance within groups, i.e. the ‘ecology of information’, have received little attention. Here we use fruitflies trained to lay eggs on specific substrates to implement information into groups containing both trained and untrained individuals....
Chapter
Full-text available
Networks are a means of representing complex interaction structures which can be used to model relations and processes in physical, biological, social and information systems. Most networks used to date have been static networks where interactions do not change over time, mainly due to computational limitations. However, many of the processes best...