Craig Norris

Craig Norris
University of Tasmania · School of Creative Arts & Media

PhD

About

19
Publications
76,517
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114
Citations
Introduction
Dr Craig Norris’ research focuses on media’s role in shaping our perception of the world around us. He is particularly interested in how audiences participate, express and circulate their stories within the changing media landscape and how these acts strengthen communities through media. He has published numerous journal articles and book chapters on topics including media tourism as world-building, fan and industry conflicts, making media through remixing, cosplay as social networking, and Japa
Additional affiliations
July 2006 - present
University of Tasmania
Position
  • Lecturer

Publications

Publications (19)
Chapter
Full-text available
This chapter explores the representation and performance of shōjo and otome identities within the news and entertainment website asianbeat through its travel profiles featuring Asian cosplayers visiting the Japanese city of Fukuoka. Two issues in the framing of this popular culture tourism messageare highlighted: how the asianbeat website draws upo...
Chapter
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Article
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This article examines how female yaoi fans construct an ideal fan-tourist identity through framing their online travel advice to Tokyo in terms of the distinctive properties of yaoi’s story world and conventions. In particular, I investigate how fans draw upon their relationship with yaoi – a genre focused on romantic or erotic stories between male...
Article
Full-text available
http://twentythree.fibreculturejournal.org/fcj-171-expectations-denied-fan-and-industry-conflict-around-the-localisation-of-the-japanese-video-game-yakuza-3/ Online fan cultures provides researchers with a space to observe and analyse the development and establishment of fan participation with media properties. The visibility of, and zealous postin...
Article
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URL http://journal.transformativeworks.org/index.php/twc/article/view/470/403 A small bakery in regional Tasmania, Australia, has been reimagined as a pop culture destination by Japanese tourists who claim it is the inspiration for a key location in the anime Kiki's Delivery Service. To understand how and why Japanese tourists have located this ba...
Article
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http://intersections.anu.edu.au/issue32/bainbridge_norris.htm
Article
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Among the various representations of fans in film, the image of the psychologically troubled and socially awkward individual is amongst the most common. In this article,I discuss the anime Perfect Blue (Kon, 1997) as a text that directly engages with the negative portrayal of fans by depicting a deranged stalker and his obsession with a young femal...
Article
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This article is part of a larger research project looking at the role of Australian media companies in sustaining fan and Australian investment in global popular culture. This article focuses on Madman Entertainment - one of the most successful DVD and merchandise distribution companies in Australia and the leading distributor of anime, with over 9...
Article
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http://refractory.unimelb.edu.au/2012/11/06/norris/ Fan pilgrimages to media locations have been variously described as fads or underground activities. More recently there has been a trend to consider cult media tourism as increasingly incorporated into official tourism branding and promotion strategies. This article details how fans and industry ‘...
Article
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An interesting debate is occurring around the role of popular culture in the context of globalisation and definitions of national identity. In this article I focus on the notion that there is a distinctive Japanese aesthetic in manga and ani me. I compare the Occidentalism of early postwar intellectual Taihei Imamura with the Orientalism of Western...
Chapter
Full-text available
For well over a century Japan has been exporting aspects of its culture. Toward the end of the 19th century, World Fairs in Paris and elsewhere offered Japan an early opportunity to take that which was 'Japanesque' to the Western world. The first half of the 20th century saw Japanese culture - especially the Japanese language, various technologies...
Chapter
Full-text available
Manga and anime are at the centre of significant innovations and cultural debates in Japan. While manga and anime are not identical fields - manga can be loosely defined as Japanese comic books, while anime encompasses the breadth of Japanese animation - they have become synonymous with a distinct Japanese contemporary visual culture and aesthetic...
Article
Full-text available
http://intersections.anu.edu.au/issue20/norris_bainbridge.htm
Article
Full-text available
http://refractory.unimelb.edu.au/2005/10/14/cyborg-girls-and-shape-shifters-the-discovery-of-difference-by-anime-and-manga-fans-in-australia-craig-norris/
Thesis
Full-text available
This thesis is an investigation into the cross-cultural appropriation of manga and anime by fans in Australia. I investigate the ways in which fans embark on ‘identity projects’ through manga and anime to construct a space where issues of gender politics, identity, and culture are explored. I argue that a key reason why many Western fans and schola...

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Projects (2)