Courtney Copeland

Courtney Copeland
Brigham and Women's Hospital | BWH · Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine

Doctor of Philosophy

About

13
Publications
1,826
Reads
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185
Citations
Citations since 2016
10 Research Items
170 Citations
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2016201720182019202020212022010203040
2016201720182019202020212022010203040

Publications

Publications (13)
Article
Full-text available
Background: In 2012, mutations in Cav1 were found to be the driving mutation in several cases of heritable pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). These mutations replaced the last 21 amino acids of Cav1 with a novel 22-amino-acid sequence. Because previously only Cav1 knockouts had been studied in the context of PAH, examining the in vivo effects o...
Preprint
Full-text available
Evidence suggests that the deregulation of SRC Family Kinases may play a role in the development of heritable pulmonary arterial hypertension, associated with BMPR2 mutations. The truncated c-terminus of the BMPR2 protein is known to increase the phosphorylation and downstream activity of SRC tyrosine kinases. To test the hypothesis that the inhibi...
Article
Full-text available
Caveolin-1 (CAV1) is an essential component of caveolae and is implicated in numerous physiological processes. Recent studies have identified heterozygous mutations in the CAV1 gene in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), but the mechanisms by which these mutations impact caveolae assembly and contribute to disease remain unclear. T...
Article
Full-text available
Caveolin-1 (Cav1) drives the formation of flask-shaped membrane invaginations known as caveolae that participate in signaling, clathrin-independent endocytosis and mechanotransduction. Overexpression or mutations of Cav1 can lead to its mistrafficking, including its accumulation in a perinuclear compartment previously identified as the Golgi comple...
Article
Cytomegaloviruses (CMVs) produce chemokines (vCXCLs) that have both sequence and functional homology to host chemokines. Assessment of vCXCL-1's role in CMV infection is limited to in vitro and in silico analysis due to CMV's species specificity. In this study, we used the murine CMV (MCMV) mouse model to evaluate the function of vCXCL-1 in vivo. R...
Article
Congenital generalized lipodystrophy (CGL) and pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) have recently been associated with mutations in the caveolin-1 (CAV1) gene, which encodes the primary structural protein of caveolae. However, little is currently known about how these CAV1 mutations impact caveolae formation or contribute to the development of dis...
Article
Full-text available
In addition to containing highly dynamic nanoscale domains, the plasma membranes of many cell types are decorated with caveolae, flask-shaped domains enriched in the structural protein caveolin-1 (Cav1). The importance of caveolae in numerous cellular functions and processes has become well recognized, and recent years have seen dramatic advances i...
Article
Full-text available
Reovirus is a nonenveloped mammalian virus that provides a useful model system for studies of viral infections in the young. Following internalization into host cells, the outermost capsid of reovirus virions is removed by endosomal cathepsin proteases. Determinants of capsid disassembly kinetics reside in the viral σ3 protein. However, the contrib...
Article
Full-text available
How the plasma membrane is bent to accommodate clathrin-independent endocytosis remains uncertain. Recent studies suggest Shiga and cholera toxin induce membrane curvature required for their uptake into clathrin-independent carriers by binding and cross-linking multiple copies of their glycosphingolipid receptors on the plasma membrane. But it rema...
Article
Full-text available
Infection with Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1) induces defects of both cellular and humoral immune responses. Impaired CD4+ T cell help and B cell dysfunction may partially explain the low frequency of broadly neutralizing antibodies in HIV-infected individuals. To understand the extent of B cell dysfunction during HIV infection, we ass...

Questions

Question (1)
Question
I have been working with some human dermal fibroblasts grown under normal growth conditions. Recently when they were imaged by transmission microscopy, I came across some interesting electon-lucent deposits (A & B) and  other vesicular-like structures that don't seem to be encased by a membrane (C) I have never seen them before none of my colleagues can identify them either. Does anyone know what they could be? I have attached a PDF with three images.

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