Cori Wielenga

Cori Wielenga
University of Pretoria | UP · Centre for Mediation in Africa

PhD

About

36
Publications
10,455
Reads
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68
Citations
Introduction
Cori Wielenga is an associate professor in the Department of Political Sciences and the Director of the Centre for Mediation in Africa. She holds a PhD in Conflict Resolution and Peace Studies from the University of KwaZulu Natal. Her research interest is in the intersection of formal and informal governance and justice systems during transitions.
Education
January 2004 - December 2010
University of KwaZulu-Natal
Field of study
  • Conflict Resolution and Peace Studies

Publications

Publications (36)
Article
Full-text available
In 1994, over a million Tutsi and moderate Hutu were brutally killed in Rwanda during a three-month-long genocide. Another million Rwandans died in refugee camps and unrest in the Democratic Republic of Congo over the following few years. In response to the need for peace and security, the government that came into power directly after the genocide...
Article
Full-text available
Sharing our stories has been described, by those in the field as well as by popular opinion, as a way to foster healing and reconciliation following violent conflict. This article argues that sharing stories is in itself not necessarily helpful. It is when our stories are shattered by the story of another that meaningful change can begin to take pl...
Article
Full-text available
Identity politics in post-genocide Rwanda has continued to centre around ethnicity, whereas this article argues that the 'lived' identities of Rwandans are far more complex and varied than the identity of ethnicity. The Rwandan government has attempted to transcend ethnicity through laws that prohibit the use of ethnicities and the introduction of...
Book
This book explores justice ‘on the ground’ in Southern African communities, and in particular the roles that women play in these processes. Justice on the ground is often critiqued for being male-dominated and patriarchal. This volume seeks to unpack and problematize this assumption through the case studies of Namibia, Zimbabwe, Mozambique and Sout...
Chapter
In this volume, we are interested in justice ‘on the ground’ in Southern African communities, and in particular in the roles that women play in this process. In this Introduction, we will explore the role of women in justice on the ground from the starting point of the lived experiences of women, and in the intersections of race, class, culture and...
Chapter
The following chapter discusses a community court in the Namibian village of Okombahe and focuses further on women in developing the quality of justice on the ground. The chapter will first sketch the emergence of community courts and their constitutional legitimation in Namibia. Afterwards, a brief description of the village of Okombahe, the Damar...
Chapter
Justice on the ground is often critiqued for being male-dominated and ‘patriarchal’. This is an assumption that we want to unpack and problematise in this chapter, and through the case studies in this volume. Engaging with such assumptions is of particular interest for this volume, since our case studies reveal the complex and organic ways in which...
Chapter
Justice on the ground is being practiced in the absence of, or together with, state-led justice systems across the African continent. The driving question is: How do we support justice on the ground without distorting, damaging or substantially changing it? How do we support the complex and multi-varied roles that women play in resolving conflicts...
Article
Women played a range of complex roles during the liberation struggle in Zimbabwe between 1961 and 1980. However, although the Zimbabwean post-independence government made attempts to promote gender equity following the liberation struggle, women ex-combatants continue to experience unequal access to redress compared to their male counterparts. Part...
Article
Full-text available
Higher education has been strongly contested in recent times, on the grounds of its role in reproducing epistemic injustice, leading to calls to ‘decolonise’ institutions, curricula and teaching practices. Meanwhile, the practice of epistemic critique also points to potentials for challenge, learning and change. This article offers critical reflect...
Article
Both Burundi and South Sudan experience intractable conflicts which national and international actors struggle to resolve. Efforts to consolidate the nation‐state and foster social cohesion seem to be unsuccessful. As has been well documented in the literature, top‐down efforts to facilitate social cohesion by international and national actors are...
Article
This forum contributes to debates on migration, displacement, and place-making in contemporary sub-Saharan Africa. We bring together an interdisciplinary group of scholars to move the existing literature beyond the dominant focus on the causes of displacement to a rich and granular exploration of its consequences . The forum focuses on Somali refug...
Chapter
This chapter situates itself within the larger debate around the 'local turn' in peacebuilding, which includes local agency and ownership, but as Leonardsson and Rudd (2015) point out, has often been more visible as a rhetorical tool than in actually shaping peace interventions. They identify two arms of the 'local turn' literature in peacebuilding...
Book
The handbook is aimed at civil society organisations on the roles and positions of women in ‘justice on the ground’ in Southern Africa. In this volume, they attempt to critically engage with the idea that community justice and leadership institutions are necessarily ‘patriarchal’ and explore what this means, and what the lived realities of people o...
Article
Full-text available
The ubiquitous Internet platform in Africa has given rise to a new set of non-state actors responding to protracted conflicts through the use of new media technology. As a departure from a state-centric approach to addressing conflict in Africa, this interdisciplinary study explores the contribution of the public in responding to armed conflicts th...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Burundi has seen decades of violent conflict, caused by a complex interplay of ethnic and political factors. Hundreds of thousands of Burundians have died, and as many have fled to other countries. In this context, there has been an intensely high level of international and regional involvement in peacebuilding, including large amounts of funding p...
Research
Full-text available
Rwanda has a history of violent conflict resulting in mass exoduses of people to neighbouring countries, both prior to the 1994 genocide and after it. This article will consider the experiences of Rwandan refugees in terms of their relationship to their home country. Their differing attitudes towards Rwanda after the genocide will be explored throu...
Article
Full-text available
Reconciliation has become an integral part of the post-conflict peace-building process, and has come to be seen as an integral part of sustaining peace and security, particularly at the local level. The tension between a state security and human security approach to peace-building is particularly evident in national reconciliation and transitional...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Transitional justice and reconciliation processes have become central to postconflict peacebuilding in Africa. Yet these processes are contentious on numerous levels: Firstly, they reveal tensions between local and external actors both in terms of how they are conceptualised and how they are actualised. Secondly, they reveal the gap between what th...
Chapter
Full-text available
Directly after violent conflict, states have the difficult task of rebuilding and reconciling the nation. Central to this process seems to be holding democratic elections, but election periods in many African states are often accompanied by the fear of renewed violence. Instead of offering a positive step towards reconciliation, elections instead s...
Article
Full-text available
National reconciliation has increasingly become an integral part of post-conflict recovery processes in Africa. What national reconciliation means, how it differs from interpersonal reconciliation and to what extent governments can facilitate reconciliation at all remains under debate. This article examines government institutions intended to facil...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Recent studies in the area of trauma after violent conflict have found that second generation survivors may carry memories of trauma that occurred prior to their birth. In addition to this, the effects of collective trauma that remains unresolved within a society may become symptomatic amongst the second and third generation. Exploring individual a...
Article
Full-text available
Memory after violent conflict is a contentious issue. The way in which the past has been remembered has often been the impetus for renewed violence rather than healing and reconciliation. Exploring individual and collective memory in the Rwandan and South African contexts, this article argues that how we remember is more important than what we reme...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Memory after violent conflict is a contentious issue. The way in which the past has been remembered has often been the impetus for renewed violence rather than healing and reconciliation. Exploring collective memory in the Rwandan and South African contexts, this paper argues that how we remember is more important than what we remember if the proce...
Chapter
This paper considers the role of narrative research in human rights law, using Rwanda as a case study. The post-genocide Rwandan government has declared its intent to align itself with international human rights law and instil human rights practices. However, Rwanda’s human rights record remains controversial. Narrative research can contribute to o...

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
This projects aims to map the ways in which women traditional leaders contribute to political representation in Africa.
Project
This comparative research project examines reconciliation and transitional justice in postconflict peacebuilding in Africa. A lot of uncertainty remains about processes and mechanisms of national reconciliation and transitional justice, how they work and their actual contribution to peacebuilding. This project straddles transboundary governance, security governance and governance of the commons, and addresses three major challenges to reconciliation and transitional justice: The lack of empirical research related to how particular national reconciliation and transitional justice mechanisms impact peacebuilding in local communities The difficulty of balancing adherence to ‘international norms’ with the needs of local governments and communities The fact that many conflicts occur across borders whereas reconciliation and transitional justice is imagined only within the nation-state.