Cori L. Lausen

Cori L. Lausen
Wildlife Conservation Society, Canada | WCS

BSc Science, BEd Secondary, MSc, PhD

About

55
Publications
15,456
Reads
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1,279
Citations
Introduction
Additional affiliations
October 2011 - April 2016
Wildlife Conservation Society, Canada
Position
  • Postdoctoral Fellow, Research Associate - Bat Specialist

Publications

Publications (55)
Article
Full-text available
Pseudogymnoascus destructans (Pd) is the causative agent of white-nose syndrome, which has resulted in the death of millions of bats in North America (NA) since 2006. Based on mortalities in eastern NA, the westward spread of infections likely poses a significant threat to western NA bats. To help prevent/reduce Pd infections in bats in western NA,...
Article
The increasing complexity and pace of ecological change requires natural resource managers to consider entire species assemblages. Acoustic recording units (ARUs) require minimal cost and effort to deploy and inform relative activity, or encounter rates, for multiple species simultaneously. ARU‐based surveys require post‐processing of the recording...
Article
Full-text available
While torpid, small hibernators experience negative water balance due to evaporative water loss. The use of humid hibernacula and ability to drink during periodic arousals allows most hibernators to manage this deficit over the course of a winter. Some populations of big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus) hibernate in relatively dry rock-crevices that d...
Article
Full-text available
Species with broad geographic ranges may experience varied environmental conditions throughout their range leading to local adaptation. Variation among populations reflects potential adaptability or plasticity, with implications for populations impacted by disease, climate change, and other anthropogenic influences. However, behavior may counteract...
Article
Full-text available
Climate change and disease are threats to biodiversity that may compound and interact with one another in ways that are difficult to predict. White-nose syndrome (WNS), caused by a cold-loving fungus (Pseudogymnoascus destructans), has had devastating impacts on North American hibernating bats, and impact severity has been linked to hibernaculum mi...
Article
Full-text available
Hibernation is widespread among mammals in a variety of environmental contexts. However, few experimental studies consider interspecific comparisons, which may provide insight into general patterns of hibernation strategies. We studied 13 species of free-living bats, including populations spread over thousands of kilometers and diverse habitats. We...
Article
Full-text available
The bat fauna of northwestern Canada remains poorly known, principally due to a lack of dedicated surveys across this vast region. To better assess the diversity of bats in the region, we compiled records from several acoustic survey projects and capture sessions whose purpose was to inventory bats in Yukon and northwestern British Columbia (BC) fr...
Article
Full-text available
Aim The fungal pathogen Pseudogymnoascus destructans and resultant white-nose syndrome (WNS) continues to advance across North America, infecting new bat hibernacula. Western North America hosts the highest bat diversity in the United States and Canada, yet little is known about hibernacula and hibernation behaviour in this region. An improved unde...
Article
Full-text available
White-nose syndrome (WNS) has decimated hibernating bat populations across eastern and central North America for over a decade. Disease severity is driven by the interaction between bat characteristics, the cold-loving fungal agent, and the hibernation environment. While we further improve hibernation energetics models, we have yet to examine how s...
Preprint
Full-text available
Bergmann's Rule--which posits that larger animals live in colder areas--is thought to influence variation in body size within species across space and time, but evidence for this claim is mixed. We tested four competing hypotheses for spatio-temporal variation in body size within bat species during the past two decades across North America. Bayesia...
Preprint
Full-text available
Climate change and disease are threats to biodiversity that may compound and interact with one another in ways that are difficult to predict. White-nose syndrome (WNS), caused by a cold-loving fungus ( Pseudogymnoascus destructans ), has had devastating impacts on North American hibernating bats, and impact severity has been linked to hibernaculum...
Article
A.E. Morales et al. (2021. Can. J. Zool. 99(5): 415–422) provided no new evidence to alter the conclusions of C.L. Lausen et al. (2019. Can. J. Zool. 97(3): 267–279). We present background information, relevant comparisons, and clarification of analyses to further strengthen our conclusions. The genesis of the original “evotis–keenii” study in Brit...
Preprint
Full-text available
White-nose syndrome (WNS) has decimated hibernating bat populations across eastern and central North America for over a decade. Disease severity is driven by the interaction between bat characteristics, the cold-loving fungal agent, and the hibernation environment. While we further improve hibernation energetics models, we have yet to examine how s...
Article
Full-text available
Collaborative monitoring over broad scales and levels of ecological organization can inform conservation efforts necessary to address the contemporary biodiversity crisis. An important challenge to collaborative monitoring is motivating local engagement with enough buy-in from stakeholders while providing adequate top-down direction for scientific...
Article
Full-text available
In multihost disease systems, differences in mortality between species may reflect variation in host physiology, morphology, and behavior. In systems where the pathogen can persist in the environment, microclimate conditions, and the adaptation of the host to these conditions, may also impact mortality. White‐nose syndrome (WNS) is an emerging dise...
Article
Full-text available
Caves and other subterranean features provide unique environments for many species. The importance of cave microclimate is particularly relevant at temperate latitudes where bats make seasonal use of caves for hibernation. White‐nose syndrome (WNS), a fungal disease that has devastated populations of hibernating bats across eastern and central Nort...
Book
Full-text available
The Handbook summarizes all the key steps in conducting an acoustic survey of a bat community, including project planning, strategies for data collection, approaches to analysis and interpretation, a guide to purchasing a bat detector, and a series of case studies. Chapter 1 (“Introduction to bat echolocation”) provides a broad introduction to the...
Article
Full-text available
The known distributions of eastern red bats and western red bats in western North America have changed greatly over the past 2 decades, resulting in inaccurate range maps and uncertainty regarding the presence or probable absence of these species within states and provinces. We obtained capture and specimen records from the western United States an...
Article
Wildlife species exhibit changes in behavior, population dynamics, and abundance after disturbances to forests. In western North America, large swathes of dead trees have resulted from unusually large outbreaks of bark beetles (Dendroctonus spp.) over recent decades. For bats, these tree mortality events could be either negative or positive, depend...
Article
Recognizing delineations of gene flow among groups of animals can be challenging but is necessary for conservation and management. Of particular importance is the identification of species boundaries. Several physical and genetic traits have been used with mixed success to distinguish Myotis keenii (Merriam, 1895) (Keen’s myotis) and Myotis evotis...
Technical Report
Full-text available
The North American Bat Monitoring Program (NABat) is a multi-national, multi-agency coordinated monitoring program designed to assess the status and trends of North American bats at local, state, and range-wide scales. NABat monitoring efforts focus on the 47 species of bats shared by Canada, the United States, and Mexico. NABat is composed of a ne...
Article
Bat species are traditionally identified morphologically, but in some cases, species can be difficult to differentiate. Wing punches (biopsies) of wing or tail membranes are commonly used to collect tissue for DNA analysis, but less invasive techniques are preferable. As such, DNA acquired using buccal and wing swabs or from fecal pellets are incre...
Article
Full-text available
The fungus that causes bat white-nose syndrome (WNS) recently leaped from eastern North America to the Pacific Coast. The pathogen’s spread is associated with the genetic population structure of a host (Myotis lucifugus). To understand the fine-scale neutral and immunogenetic variation among northern populations of M. lucifugus, we sampled 1142 ind...
Poster
Full-text available
Pseudogymnoascus destructans (Pd), the fungus responsible for white-nose syndrome (WNS) in bats, has devastated North American bat populations over the last decade.The present study covered the screening of cultivated environmental microbes (from mushrooms, phylloplane, tree bark and several infected plant woods, leaves from Bush and Timber lakes,...
Article
Full-text available
Information on the roost requirements of small, temperate-zone hibernating bats, which can spend up to 8 months in hibernation, is crucial to their conservation. We studied male big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus) in southeastern Alberta, Canada, to investigate the physical and microclimate characteristics of hibernacula used by this species in a pra...
Article
Full-text available
Winter activity of bats is common, yet poorly understood. Other studies suggest a relationship between winter activity and ambient temperature, particularly temperature at sunset. We recorded echolocation calls to determine correlates of hourly bat activity in Dinosaur Provincial Park, Alberta, Canada. We documented bat activity in temperatures as...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Four species of long-eared myotis bats occur in British Columbia: Keen’s Myotis (Myotis keenii), Northern Myotis (M. septentrionalis), Long-eared Myotis (M. evotis), and Fringed Myotis (M. thysanodes). Myotis keenii and M. evotis are especially difficult to tell apart in the hand in areas where the species are sympatric. Field differentiation is de...
Technical Report
Full-text available
The purpose of the North American Bat Monitoring Program (NABat) is to create a continent-wide program to monitor bats at local to rangewide scales that will provide reliable data to promote effective conservation decisionmaking and the long-term viability of bat populations across the continent. This is an international, multiagency program. Four...
Data
Full-text available
The purpose of the North American Bat Monitoring Program (NABat) is to create a continent-wide program to monitor bats at local to rangewide scales that will provide reliable data to promote effective conservation decisionmaking and the long-term viability of bat populations across the continent. This is an international, multiagency program. Four...
Article
Full-text available
After being virtually ignored, bats in northwestern Canada and Alaska have recently been subject to increasing attention by scientists, resource managers, and the public. We review recent advances in bat research in the region and identify key priorities for future research, including what we believe is needed to provide a more coordinated approach...
Article
Full-text available
The bat fauna of Alaska and northwestern Canada remains poorly known, principally due to a lack of dedicated surveys. To better assess the diversity of bats in the region, we conducted full-spectrum acoustic surveys at several sites in Yukon, Canada. During our surveys we obtained the 1st acoustic records of Hoary Bat (Lasiurus cinereus) and Long-L...
Article
Little is known about the distribution of Eastern Red Bats (Lasiurus borealis) at the northwestern edge of their range. We compiled and examined a data set of Eastern Red Bat capture and acoustic records from northern Alberta to examine their distribution, seasonality, and reproductive status near the edge of their range. Acoustic data suggested wi...
Article
The occurrence of bats at the northern limit of their ranges in the Northwest Territories (NT), Canada, is not well documented. We provide information on the diversity and distribution of bat species in the NT by synthesizing available records. Before 2006, only 3 species of bats were known to occur in the NT: Little Brown Myotis (Myotis lucifugus)...
Article
Relatively little is known about bats or bat hibernacula in northern Canada. We were interested in documenting species diversity and seasonal activity of bats in Wood Buffalo National Park, including use of a cave hibernaculum by Little Brown Myotis (Myotis lucifugus), Northern Myotis (Myotis septentrionalis), and Big Brown Bats (Eptesicus fuscus)....
Article
Although 5 species of bats have been documented in Southeast Alaska, information on species not of the genus Myotis is derived solely from 4 specimens of the Silver-haired Bat (Lasionycteris noctivagans). We acoustically monitored for bat species that produce low frequency echolocation calls (<30 kHz minimum frequency), specifically Hoary Bat (Lasi...
Article
Few bat inventories have taken place in Northwest Territories (NWT), Canada, an area currently known to be the northernmost extent of the ranges of at least 6 bat species. Only 2 species of bats, the Northern Myotis (Myotis septentrionalis) and Little Brown Myotis (M. lucifugus), were previously known from the Nahanni National Park Reserve in the s...
Article
Population fragmentation compromises population viability, reduces a species ability to respond to climate change, and ultimately may reduce biodiversity. We studied the current state and potential causes of fragmentation in grizzly bears over approximately 1,000,000 km2 of western Canada, the northern United States (US), and southeast Alaska. We c...
Article
Full-text available
Article
Full-text available
In Southern Alberta and north-central Montana, there is substantial mtDNA sequence divergence between two groups of the little brown bat, Myotis lucifugus (LeConte, 1831). previously thought to be subspecies (Myotis lucifugus lucifugus and Myotis lucifugus carissima) but recently hypothesized to be species. We tested this hypothesis using populatio...
Thesis
Full-text available
I characterized various aspects of bat ecology in a prairie landscape, focussing on 3 species: western small-footed myotis, Myotis ciliolabrum, little brown myotis, M. lucifugus, and big brown bats, Eptesicus fuscus. I used radio-telemetry, acoustic monitoring and molecular genetics to address questions of roosting ecology and landscape genetics at...
Article
Full-text available
Periodic arousal from hibernation among mammalian hibernators is poorly understood. In bats, arousal is often associated with flight. We acoustically monitored two rocky areas along the Red Deer River in southeastern Alberta for bat activity in autumn, winter, and spring months. We found bats to be active in all months and at unexpectedly cold temp...
Article
Full-text available
Individuals of some species of bats roost in human-made structures despite the apparent availability of natural roosts. We compared patterns of thermoregulation in relation to microclimate and compared reproductive timing for maternity colonies of big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus) roosting in natural and building roosts in the prairies of southeast...
Article
I found Carios kelleyi Cooley & Kohls (formerly Ornithodoros kelleyi) (Acari: Ixodida: Argasidae) on five species of bats (Eptesicusfuscus, Myotis lucifugus, Myotis ciliolabrum, Myotis evotis, and Myotis volans) in the prairies of southeastern Alberta and north central Montana. This is the first occurrence of ticks on bats in Canada. This is also t...
Article
A free-ranging maternity colony of big brown bats Eptesicus fuscus roosting in rock crevices along the South Saskatchewan River in south-eastern Alberta, Canada, was studied to understand better the discrepancy that exists in the literature regarding torpor use by reproductive female bats. Using radio-telemetry, thermoregulatory patterns and roost...
Article
Full-text available
Listed as 'vulnerable' by the International Union for theConservation of Nature, the molossid bat Otomopsmartiensseni occurs widely in Africa and, according to someauthorities, in Madagascar. Apart from a few known cave roosts, there are fewrecords of O. martiensseni, although around Durban, SouthAfrica, the species is common and roosts in building...
Article
We studied big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus) roosting in rock crevices along the South Saskatchewan River in southeastern Alberta. We documented roosting behaviour and roost selection. During pregnancy and lactation, individuals aggregated as several small groups or one large group (maternity colony). Postlactating females roosted alone more freque...
Article
With the development of small implantable data loggers and externally attached temperature-sensitive radio transmitters, increasing attention is being paid to determining the thermoregulatory strategies of free-ranging birds and mammals. One of the constraints of such studies is that without a direct measure of metabolic rate, it is difficult to de...
Article
With the development of small implantable data loggers and externally attached temperature-sensitive radio transmitters, increasing attention is being paid to determining the thermoregulatory strategies of free-ranging birds and mammals. One of the constraints of such studies is that without a direct measure of metabolic rate, it is difficult to de...
Article
Thirty-six of the 70 species of bats known from Belize were recorded from the area around Lamanai, Orange Walk County: two in roosts and 34 in about 680 mist net hours that produced 560 captures. Day roosts used by 35 of the species were located using radio-tracking (Sturnira lilium, Platyrrhinus helleri, Centurio senex and Bauerus dubiaquercus)...

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Projects

Projects (8)
Project
The overarching goal of our study is to gather data on what types of bat boxes people in Canada are currently using (e.g. styles, dimensions, number of chambers, mounting conditions), the microclimates of those different boxes, and the number of bats of which species use bat boxes to answer the following main questions: 1. Which bat species in Canada use bat boxes to roost in and which species use boxes to raise pups?; 2. Do different bat species in different regions of Canada prefer different types of bat boxes and associated microclimates?; 3. Do bat boxes overheat in Canada (> 40ºC) and if so, what styles of bat box overheat under what mounting conditions in which regions?; 4. Is there mortality from overheating bat boxes across Canada? project website: https://wcsbats.ca/Our-work-to-save-bats/Batbox-Project/BatBox-Project-Canada-wide
Project
To find measures of mitigation of white-nose syndrome in western Canadian bats using probiotic cocktail from healthy bat wings.