Constance Khupe

Constance Khupe
University of the Witwatersrand | wits · Office of Student Success, Faculty of Health Sciences

Doctor of Philosophy
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About

22
Publications
13,857
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145
Citations
Introduction
My interests are in docolonising research methods, especially through recognising participants' cultures, languages and worldviews. My work with students in the higher education sector informs my interest in student university experiences and in developing interventions that support students in transition. I am currently exploring the use of gaming as an intervention.
Additional affiliations
January 2013 - present
University of the Witwatersrand
Position
  • Consultant
Description
  • I facilitate academic skills development for Health Science Undergraduate students with a view to help them understand their role and take responsibility in learning. In a context where most students are considered "underprepared" for university, I see my role as contributing to a 'student-ready university'. I approach my work from a perspective of fostering a growth mindset.
October 2011 - December 2012
University of the Witwatersrand
Position
  • Researcher

Publications

Publications (22)
Conference Paper
Full-text available
In this paper we use the methodology of self-study to explore our experiences as academics applying for promotion. We use Mezirow's transformative learning theory and the African philosophy of Ubuntu to frame the study. Through narrative inquiry, we document our experiences of applying for promotion, and those narratives unpack the ‘hidden curricul...
Chapter
In this chapter we explore the meaning of transformation through our personal narratives of early learning in two different worlds geographically, physically, and paradigmatically. As three teachers, mothers, academics, and researchers, we each narrate our journey of starting out as children in South Africa (SA) and Zimbabwe respectively and coming...
Chapter
Transformation may be on individual, societal and systemic levels. Through stories, we share individual experiences and the role that relationships play in our learning. Stories also make room for the interpretations that the reader may bring. Stories are key in African tradition. Stories connect us, teach us, and bridge the divide between physical...
Chapter
In this chapter, we argue that instrumentalising indigenous methodologies for the Sustainable Development Agenda is strictly spoken impossible. We discuss the nature of indigenous ways of knowing and the encompassing worldview of Ubuntu which rests on the understanding of the interconnectedness of all life; that seeks harmony with nature and the we...
Chapter
Entitlement is a remote research topic in South Africa. Even further remote is the idea of teacher educator entitlement being a topic of academic inquiry. In this chapter, we report a self-study of a teacher educator's experiences and interactions with her students, in which the construct of entitlement was used as an interpretative lens. The data...
Chapter
Entitlement is a remote research topic in South Africa. Even further remote is the idea of teacher educator entitlement being a topic of academic inquiry. In this chapter, we report a self-study of a teacher educator’s experiences and interactions with her students, in which the construct of entitlement was used as an interpretative lens. The data...
Chapter
Colonial authorities, the world over, have persistently ignored, misunderstood and even decimated Indigenous peoples and their knowledge. In this chapter, I argue for Indigenous knowledge systems (IKS) as valid for the generation and dissemination of knowledge among Indigenous communities, and for the preservation of those knowledge systems as key...
Chapter
Full-text available
This chapter is informed by findings from a science education interpretive study carried out in collaboration with an isiZulu-speaking community. Indigenous languages constitute intellectual and cultural resources that are important for local communities and for the society. The author argues for the recognition of indigenous languages as part of t...
Article
Full-text available
At a time when social, economic and political decisions, along with environmental events, challenge the viability of remote communities, educators need to better prepare young people in these communities to work towards sustainability. Remote locations can be defined by their inaccessibility rather than just distance from the nearest services, whil...
Article
Full-text available
It is common for indigenous knowledge (IK) researchers in South Africa to conduct studies within conventional Western paradigms, especially in the field of IK–science curriculum integration. The scientific paradigm usually takes precedence and research publishing follows the rules of the academy. There is an inherent paradox in this practice. An en...
Article
Full-text available
South Africa has a number of policies to protect and promote indigenous knowledge (IK). The increasing interest in research into indigenous knowledge and science education in southern Africa has led not only to the production of publications, but also to numerous conferences, seminars, research centres, projects, learning materials, and postgraduat...
Article
Full-text available
South Africa has a number of policies to protect and promote indigenous knowledge (IK). The increasing interest in research into indigenous knowledge and science education in southern Africa has led not only to the production of publications, but also to numerous conferences, seminars, research centres, projects, learning materials, and postgraduat...
Chapter
This chapter is informed by findings from a science education interpretive study carried out in collaboration with an isiZulu-speaking community. Indigenous languages constitute intellectual and cultural resources that are important for local communities and for the society. The author argues for the recognition of indigenous languages as part of t...
Article
Full-text available
It is common for researchers in Indigenous Knowledge (IK) in science education research to draw on aspects of the scientific paradigm from their science training. The consequent research seeks to be objective. This paradigm is not necessarily appropriate for IK research. While there have been calls for IK-aligned methodologies (Chilisa 2012; Keane...
Article
Full-text available
Human rights, social justice and democracy are key pillars of the South African constitution , and also key principles of the school curriculum. Despite continued calls for research among indigenous peoples to be done in frameworks rooted in local worldviews and cultures, education research in general, and science education research in particular,...
Thesis
Full-text available
Prior to democracy in South Africa, education was used as a means to achieve segregation, privileging a minority of the population in both economic and worldview domination. With the attainment of democracy in 1994, educational reform was aimed at getting rid of both apartheid content and method. The aims and principles of the new curricula (the Re...
Article
Full-text available
While current investments in school improvement occur in the context of the worldwide economic downturn, in the South African context, there is in addition widespread disparity in education provision and attainment related to pre-democracy race-based patterns. Despite the education sector receiving the largest national annual budget allocation (at...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The principles of the South African curriculum include the valuing of indigenous knowledge systems (IKS). The intention of the inclusion of IKS in the curriculum documents does not always translate into actual classroom practice, partly due to the challenges of determining what knowledge to include in day-to-day teaching and learning, and the chall...
Conference Paper
Research that claims to be participative and that aims for redress needs to be inclusive from the framing of paradigms through to the research products. When carrying out research in rural contexts, conceptualising research questions, decisions on data collection methods, the choice of instruments, data analysis, and ethics, the ownership and disse...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The coming of democracy in South Africa has seen the introduction of education policies intended to redress historical disparities. These disparities include levels of participation and access to knowledge. While the benefits of the new policies may be felt in some sections of society, rural communities have largely remained at the margins, and the...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Politicians, curriculum planners and policy makers in most developing countries are concerned about the progress of eradicating illiteracy especially amongst their rural populations. It is indeed important to increase access to education and measure progress using the barometers of the numbers of graduates our systems produce annually, but, in most...

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Projects

Projects (4)
Project
As we become increasingly aware of the prevailing coloniality of much academic knowledge production and as many researchers are attempting to decolonise our methodologies and theoretical frameworks, one question usually still remains unaddressed: How do we write up (or present otherwise) our research in a decolonised manner? Pursuing and obtaining a Masters Degree or, even more so, a PhD is an initiation rite into a community whose centre lies in the global North and whose practices are governed by "Western" ways of producing and presenting knowledge. Most often, also (attempted) decolonial research projects end up as conventional theses, following template-like rigid structures that are tailored to present one specific form of knowledge; that kind of academic knowledge that currently dominates academia. This project asks: What would a decolonised thesis look like? The question does not imply that a decolonised thesis SHOULD per definition look entirely different. Rather, it invites reflections on format, templates and structures, on the use of theory, "findings" and "contributions". How could the outcomes of research be written up or presented in line with the epistemological assumptions that govern the research, rather than submitting to so-called international rules that are dictated by "Western" academic conventions? We invite everyone to contribute with ideas, reflections, questions and suggestions!