Conor O'Halloran

Conor O'Halloran
The University of Edinburgh | UoE · Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies

BVSc MSc PhD MRCVS

About

32
Publications
2,234
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141
Citations
Introduction
Conor O'Halloran currently works at the Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies, The University of Edinburgh. Conor does research in Veterinary Medicine, Internal Medicine (General Medicine) and Epidemiology. Their most recent publication is 'Mycobacterium bovis infection in working foxhounds'.

Publications

Publications (32)
Article
Full-text available
In Europe, animal tuberculosis (TB) due to Mycobacterium bovis involves multi-host communities that include cattle and wildlife species, such as wild boar (Sus scrofa), badgers (Meles meles) and red deer (Cervus elaphus). Red fox (Vulpes vulpes) infections have also been recently reported in some TB endemic regions in the Iberian Peninsula and Fran...
Article
A 1‐year‐old male neutered Portuguese Podengo dog was presented for lameness, inappetence, pyrexia, diarrhoea and abdominal moderate to severe lymphadenomegaly. Cytology of synovial fluid revealed neutrophilic inflammation in multiple joints suggestive of immune‐mediated polyarthritis. Cytology of fine‐needle‐aspiration material obtained from lymph...
Article
Full-text available
The interferon-gamma release assay (IGRA) is used to diagnose cases of feline mycobacteriosis, but the use of serial testing to monitor treatment responses has not been evaluated in this species. From a population of cats that underwent IGRA testing for diagnostic investigation, individuals were identified with a pre- and end-of-treatment IGRA that...
Article
Full-text available
Mycobacterium (M.) bovis can infect cats and is a demonstrated zoonosis. We describe an outbreak of M. bovis in pet cats across England and Scotland associated with feeding a commercial raw food diet. Forty‐seven cats presented with (pyo)granulomatous lesions, lymphadenopathy, pulmonary and/or alimentary disease over a one‐year period where M. bovi...
Article
Objective Afibrinogenaemic haemorrhage was previously reported in a Maine Coon cat. Two littermates subsequently died from surgical non-haemostasis, suggesting a hereditable coagulopathy. Methods We prospectively recruited cats which were: a) Maine Coons with pathological haemorrhage (group 1, n=8), b) healthy familial relatives of group 1 (group...
Article
Raw food diets are being fed to companion animals with ever-increasing frequency in the UK and elsewhere; however, the advantages and disadvantages are frequently debated. There is currently no accepted consensus regarding the best advice for clinicians to give to owners about raw feeding their pets. This review aims to discuss some of the areas wh...
Article
This short communication describes the clinical and morphological findings, diagnosis and treatment of a case of Mycobacterium avium infection in a golden retriever that presented with a progressive nasal swelling and lymphadenopathy. Although well documented in cats, where cutaneous lesions are frequently recognised, canine M avium infection is le...
Article
Full-text available
This study describes clinical and histopathological features, treatment, and outcome of cats diagnosed with ocular mycobacteriosis. Cases diagnosed from 2012 to 2017 were reviewed for (a) histopathological evidence of ocular (pyo)granulomatous inflammation containing acid-fast bacilli with mycobacterial morphology, (b) positive mycobacterial cultur...
Article
Full-text available
Objectives: Mycobacterium bovis, a member of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex, can infect cats and has proven zoonotic risks for owners. Infected cats typically present with a history of outdoor lifestyle and hunting behaviour, and cutaneous granulomas are most commonly observed. The aim of this study is to describe an outbreak of tuberculou...
Article
Full-text available
In 2017, Public Health England South East Health Protection Team (HPT) were involved in the management of an outbreak of Mycobacterium bovis (the causative agent of bovine tuberculosis) in a pack of working foxhounds. This paper summarises the actions taken by the team in managing the public health aspects of the outbreak, and lessons learned to im...
Article
Mycobacterium bovis is a re‐emerging zoonosis; it was diagnosed in five Abyssinian cats in a breeding cattery in Italy. The infection entered the cattery with an imported kitten (cat A); it had a suspected bite wound on its leg that had been treated at a veterinary clinic in Kiev, Ukraine, which is probably where it became infected with M. bovis. W...
Article
Full-text available
Mycobacterium bovis can cause tuberculosis (TB) in social mammals including lions, cattle and man, but canine infections are considered rare. In 2016/17 we investigated a M. bovis TB outbreak in a pack of approximately 180 Foxhounds within the bovine TB Edge Area of England. We employed a combination of immunological tests including an interferon g...
Article
Mycobacterial diseases are being more frequently diagnosed in companion animals in first opinion practice in the UK. These infections can be challenging both to diagnose and manage; this and a previous article aim to give an overview of the relevant background and epidemiology, management and prognosis for companion animal mycobacteriosis (CAM). Th...
Article
Mycobacterial infections are recognised with increasing frequency in cats in the UK. Over 1 per cent of all routine histopathological submissions from UK cats are found to have changes consistent with mycobacteriosis, which is thought to be an underestimate of the true prevalence. Mycobacteriosis can be highly variable in clinical presentation, cha...
Article
Full-text available
Case series summary This paper describes the clinical presentation, diagnostic imaging findings and outcome in four cats with confirmed joint-associated tuberculosis. The cats were 2–6 years of age, and immune competent. Three cases had tuberculosis affecting only one joint, whereas one case had at least three joints affected. Two cases were caused...
Article
Full-text available
Case series summary This case series discusses novel characteristics identified in two cases of cowpox. One presented with upper airway signs, and was identified to have a focal laryngeal lesion. The other had central neurological signs at the terminal stages, with intracytoplasmic inclusion bodies identified within the cerebral hemispheres on hist...
Article
Case series summary Feline tuberculosis is an increasingly recognised potential zoonosis of cats. Treatment is challenging and prognosis can vary greatly between cases. Pulmonary infection requires extended courses of antibiotics, but methodologies for sensitively monitoring response to treatment are currently lacking. In this case series, we retro...
Article
WE would like to share with colleagues a significant increase in the number and severity of feline cowpox (FPxV) cases positively diagnosed in the UK in recent weeks. At a recent meeting of the International Society for Companion Animal Infectious Diseases, it was noted by several clinicians, as well as the present authors, that the severity of pr...
Article
WE are writing in response to the SAC C VS disease surveillance report for August 2015 reporting a presumptive diagnosis of feline mycobacteriosis ( VR , December 19/26, 2015, vol 177, pp 618-621). Firstly, we would like to thank all staff at SAC C VS (SAC Consulting Veterinary Services: Disease Surveillance) for their continuing excellence in pro...

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