Colin D Chapman

Colin D Chapman
Uppsala University | UU · Department of Neuroscience

PhD, JD

About

27
Publications
6,738
Reads
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1,477
Citations
Citations since 2017
6 Research Items
973 Citations
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2017201820192020202120222023050100150
2017201820192020202120222023050100150
2017201820192020202120222023050100150

Publications

Publications (27)
Article
Full-text available
Accumulating evidence suggests that disrupted brain insulin signaling promotes the development and progression of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), driving clinicians to target this circuitry. While both traditional and more modern antidiabetics show promise in combating insulin resistance, intranasal insulin appears to be the most efficient method of boos...
Article
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There is a replication crisis spreading through the annals of scientific inquiry. While some work has been done to uncover the roots of this issue, much remains unanswered. With this in mind, this paper investigates how the gender of the experimenter may impact experimental findings. Clinical trials are regularly carried out without any report of t...
Article
Full-text available
For the last two decades research has revealed an alarming association between short sleep duration and metabolic disorders. In tandem, the hormonal, behavioral, and genetic mechanisms underlying this relationship have been extensively investigated and reviewed. However, emerging evidence is revealing that excessive sleep duration has remarkably si...
Article
Insomnia and obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) are more prevalent in patients with type 2 diabetes than in the general population. Both insomnia and OSA have been linked to cardiometabolic alterations (eg, hypertension, increased activity of the sympathetic nervous system, and systemic insulin resistance) that can exacerbate the pathophysiology of typ...
Article
Full-text available
Insulin detemir (DET) is a basal insulin analog that, in contrast to other long-acting forms of insulin, has significant weight-gain sparing effects in diabetic patients. We hypothesized that this effect of DET may be due to its enhanced catabolic action in the CNS. We investigated the long-term effects of single third ventricular (3V) microinjecti...
Article
Full-text available
Obesity is a serious and growing health concern worldwide. Watching television (TV) represents a condition during which many habitually eat, irrespective of hunger level. However, as of yet, little is known about how the content of television programs being watched differentially impacts concurrent eating behavior. In this study, eighteen normal-we...
Article
Objective: To investigate if acute sleep deprivation affects food purchasing choices in a mock supermarket. Design and methods: On the morning after one night of total sleep deprivation (TSD) or after one night of sleep, 14 normal-weight men were given a fixed budget (300 SEK-approximately 50 USD). They were instructed to purchase as much as the...
Article
Full-text available
Objective Cognitive factors and anticipation are known to influence food intake. The current study examined the effect of anticipation and actual consumption of food on hormone (ghrelin, cortisol, and insulin) and glucose levels, appetite and ad libitum intake, to assess whether changes in hormone levels might explain the predicted differences in s...
Article
Full-text available
Research in animals and humans has associated Alzheimer’s disease (AD) with decreased cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of insulin in combination with decreased insulin sensitivity (insulin resistance) in the brain. This phenomenon is accompanied by attenuated receptor expression of insulin and insulin-like growth factor, enhanced serine phosphoryla...
Article
Full-text available
We hypothesized that acutely sleep-deprived participants would rate ascending concentrations of sucrose as more intense and pleasant, than they would do after one night of normal sleep. Such a finding would offer a potential mechanism through which acute sleep loss could promote overeating in humans. A total of 16 healthy normal-weight men particip...
Article
Full-text available
We read with great interest the article by Baker and colleagues1 showing that 20 weeks of subcutaneous growth hormone–releasing hormone (GHRH) administration had favorable effects on cognition in both adults with mild cognitive impairment and healthy older adults. These findings highlight the therapeutic potential of administering GHRH to slow the...
Article
Acute sleep loss increases food intake in adults. However, little is known about the influence of acute sleep loss on portion size choice, and whether this depends on both hunger state and the type of food (snack or meal item) offered to an individual. The aim of the current study was to compare portion size choice after a night of sleep and a peri...
Article
Objective: Cognitive factors and anticipation are known to influence food intake. The current study examined the effect of anticipation and actual consumption of food on hormone (ghrelin, cortisol, insulin) and glucose levels, appetite and ad libitum intake, to assess whether changes in hormone levels might explain the predicted differences in subs...
Article
Acute sleep loss increases food intake in adults. However, little is known about the influence of acute sleep loss on portion size choice, and whether this depends on both hunger state and the type of food (snack or meal item) offered to an individual. The aim of the current study was to compare portion size choice after a night of sleep and a peri...
Article
Full-text available
Under physiological conditions, the central nervous system (CNS) utilizes glucose energy independent of insulin. This has led many researchers to believe that CNS functions are not sensitive to insulin. However, this prevailing concept was challenged in the late seventies when insulin receptors were found localized, in high density, in many CNS reg...
Article
Background: We hypothesized that acutely sleep-deprived participants would rate ascending concentrations of sucrose as more intense and pleasant, than they would do after one night of normal sleep. Such a finding would offer a potential mechanism through which acute sleep loss could promote overeating in humans. Method: Sixteen healthy normal-weig...
Article
Full-text available
One of the most challenging problems facing modern medicine is how to deliver a given drug to a specific target at the exclusion of other regions. For example, a variety of compounds have beneficial effects within the central nervous system (CNS), but unwanted side effects in the periphery. For such compounds, traditional oral or intravenous drug d...
Article
Full-text available
Obesity is emerging as the most significant health concern of the 21st century. Although this is attributable in part to changes in our environment-including the increased prevalence of energy-dense food-it also appears that several lifestyle factors may increase our vulnerability to this calorie-rich landscape. Epidemiologic studies have begun to...
Article
In the central nervous system, the endocannabinoid anandamide [N-arachidonoylethanolamine (AEA)] is believed to increase food intake through on-demand activation of hypothalamic circuits. The present study examined the effects of hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) injections of AEA (25-400 pmol) on food intake and energy substrate oxidation...
Article
Previous evidence indicates that peripherally administered ghrelin significantly increases corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) mRNA and serum corticosterone. In addition, intraventricular administration of ghrelin has been reported to elicit anxiety-like behaviors suggesting that the peptide plays a role in mediating neuroendocrine and behavioral...
Article
Ghrelin microinjections into discrete regions of the hypothalamus, including the paraventricular nucleus (PVN), stimulate eating and promote carbohydrate oxidation, effects similar to PVN microinjection of neuropeptide Y (NPY). We have also reported that NPY's orexigenic and metabolic effects are antagonized by pretreatment with 5-hydroxytryptamine...

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