Cody W. Telep

Cody W. Telep
Arizona State University | ASU · School of Criminology and Criminal Justice

PhD

About

55
Publications
65,178
Reads
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2,693
Citations
Introduction
Cody W. Telep is an associate professor in the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Arizona State University. His research focuses on the impact of police practices on crime and disorder, assessing the relationship between police activities and perceptions of legitimacy, understanding how to advance the use of evidence-based policies and practices in policing and criminal justice, and using experimental methodologies in evaluation research.
Additional affiliations
August 2013 - present
Arizona State University
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
August 2008 - July 2013
George Mason University
Position
  • Research Associate

Publications

Publications (55)
Article
Sexual assaults are underreported to the police, even though this crime affects one in four college women. Using a vignette design, this study fills a gap in the literature by examining the influence of prior police perceptions, procedurally unjust treatment, and the sex of the responding officer on college women's likelihood to report sexual assau...
Article
Intelligence-led policing focuses on using intelligence and analysis to reduce, address, and prevent crime or other forms of harm through a wide array of strategies. Traditionally, this has been associated with a top-down approach. A collaborative effort by the Phoenix Police Department and Arizona State University sought to take an innovative appr...
Article
Full-text available
Significance Our study is a randomized trial in policing confirming that intensive training in procedural justice (PJ) can lead to more procedurally just behavior and less disrespectful treatment of people at high-crime places. The fact that the PJ intervention reduced arrests by police officers, positively influenced residents’ perceptions of poli...
Article
National victimization data suggest less than 50% of violent crime incidents are reported to the police. Official reports of crime to police, however, are often the only type of data used for the analysis of violence problems, the identification of geographic concentrations of violent crime, and the selection of targets for police and prevention re...
Article
Police applicant disqualification due to prior illegal drug use is a contributing factor to major recruitment and hiring challenges currently facing many American policing agencies. This article explores how chief executives of law enforcement agencies and college students enrolled in criminology courses in Arizona view current statewide police hir...
Article
In this paper, we describe the assessment and planning phase of the Thrive community‐based initiative to reduce violence and address other determinants of health in a community in the Southwestern United States. Using community‐based participatory research (CBPR) and an implementation science framework, we engaged residents and other key stakeholde...
Article
Research Summary In 2017, we published an essay (Nagin & Telep, 2017) that challenged the widely held view that research had plausibly demonstrated that procedurally just treatment of citizens by police increased the citizen's willingness to comply with the law and thereby reduced crime rates. This article updates Nagin and Telep (2017) with new ev...
Article
Full-text available
Background Herman Goldstein developed problem‐oriented policing (POP) to focus police on more proactively addressing chronic problems, rather than using traditional reactive efforts. POP has been utilized to target a wide range of problems and has become commonly used in agencies across the United States and the world, although implementation is of...
Article
In recent years, a number of translational tools have been developed in policing to make the growing research evidence base more accessible and useful for practitioners and policymakers. Here we focus on the creation of the ‘What works in policing?’ website, which resulted from a collaboration between a government agency in Seattle, Washington and...
Article
Participatory action research (PAR) focuses on conducting research with people, instead of on people. While this collaborative approach has been used across a range of disciplines, criminology has been slow to adopt the tenets of PAR. The current article seeks to reinvigorate the discussion of PAR as a research methodology within corrections. We hi...
Article
Purpose The purpose of this paper is to explore the extent to which intelligence officers integrated at the patrol level contribute to successful case outcomes through information sharing. Design/methodology/approach This study utilizes multinomial logistic regression to analyze the outcomes of three years of Intelligence Officer Reports (IORs)...
Article
Hot spots policing, in which police resources are directed toward small geographic areas with high crime levels, has been widely implemented and evaluated, but less is known about the effectiveness of nonpolice efforts to address high‐crime locations. Here, we examine the effectiveness of two hot spot interventions led by a community‐based nonprofi...
Article
Objectives: This study tested the effect of procedural injustice relative to being sanctioned by police on a variety of outcome measures, such as decision acceptance and immediate compliance, in two types of police–citizen encounters, traffic stops and noise complaints. Methods: A factorial vignette design was used to determine the effect that the...
Article
Since October 2014, the Phoenix Police Department has been implementing an innovative program to integrate intelligence into patrol operations through the use of intelligence officers (IOs). The program involves the use of IOs trained to focus on information gathering and reporting to intelligence analysts as part of their daily patrol activities a...
Article
This article reviews the evidence on whether procedurally just treatment of citizens by agents of the criminal justice system, usually the police, has the effect of increasing the citizen’s compliance with the law. In brief, we find that perception-based studies consistently show that citizen perceptions of procedurally just treatment are closely t...
Article
We are heartened by Tom Tyler’s concurrence with the key conclusion of our full essay that evidence of procedurally just treatment of citizens by police or other representatives of the criminal justice system altering citizen perceptions of legitimacy and legal compliance is in short supply. Our main point of disagreement with Tyler is on how this...
Article
Evidence-based policing has become a commonly used term in academic circles to describe policing practices guided by research evidence demonstrating their effectiveness. Little is known, however, about how police practitioners understand and define the term and the extent to which these definitions align with researcher conceptions of the term. We...
Article
Full-text available
Objectives Prior research demonstrates that crime is highly concentrated at place and that these concentrations are stable from year to year, highlighting the importance of place to crime control and prevention. A potential limitation is that most studies only use one data source to diagnose these patterns. The present study uses data from both pol...
Article
Full-text available
Research Summary: Just four decades ago, the predominant narrative in crime prevention and rehabilitation was that nothing works. Since that time, criminologists have accumulated a wide body of evidence about programs and practices in systematic reviews. In this article, we summarize what is known in seven broad criminal justice areas by drawing on...
Chapter
While just a decade ago, there were almost no systematic reviews on policing, we now have 17 completed systematic reviews of police practices. We examined these reviews to assess what we have learned, questions that remain unanswered, and how we can best move forward. Our findings suggest the effectiveness of a number of policing strategies for add...
Article
Recent calls for police to focus more on integrating research into practice require paying closer attention to how receptive frontline practitioners are to using research. Officers in four U.S. municipal agencies (n = 992) were surveyed to assess their exposure to research, knowledge about the evidence base, view of science, and willingness to eval...
Book
Over the last two decades, there has been increased interest in the distribution of crime and other antisocial behavior at lower levels of geography. The focus on micro geography and its contribution to the understanding and prevention of crime has been called the ‘criminology of place’. It pushes scholars to examine small geographic areas within c...
Article
Chiefs and sheriffs play a key role in efforts to make police agencies more evidence-based. Understanding their views and knowledge about evidence-based policing is thus crucial for assessing the current state of policing and areas where change would be useful. We present findings from a survey of 45 Oregon police chiefs and sheriffs on receptivity...
Chapter
Hot spots policing involves police focusing more resources on small units of geography (e.g., addresses, street blocks, small groups of street blocks) with high levels of criminal activity. The tactics police use at these crime hot spots can vary, but often involve some combination of increasing patrol presence and problem solving. There are a larg...
Article
Objectives To assess the nature and extent of funding for randomized experiments in criminology and criminal justice from the National Institute of Justice (NIJ) since 2000. Methods Based on data from official records of grant awards made by NIJ between fiscal years 2001 and 2013, we categorized awards based on whether they were for randomized expe...
Article
This study considers whether police departments’ characteristics relate to the methodology and results of the evaluations that they participate in, and contrasts police departments that have carried out rigorous crime prevention research to comparison groups of US police agencies. Findings include departments that participate in quasi-experimental...
Article
Objectives To review what we have learned from the policing systematic reviews funded by the National Policing Improvement Agency (NPIA) and to examine the importance of funding and influential individuals in advancing scientific knowledge. Methods We use the history of randomized experiments in criminology and policing to emphasize how influent...
Article
Objectives To conduct a systematic review examining the extent to which there is crime displacement or a diffusion of crime control benefits in social control interventions implemented in medium sized or large geographic areas. Methods A number of search strategies were used to identify and code eligible experimental or quasi-experimental studie...
Article
Full-text available
Objectives Systematically review and synthesize the existing research on community-oriented policing to identify its effects on crime, disorder, fear, citizen satisfaction, and police legitimacy. Methods We searched a broad range of databases, websites, and journals to identify eligible studies that measured pre-post changes in outcomes in treat...
Article
Police officer receptivity to empirical research and evidence-based policing is important to consider because officers are responsible for implementing approaches validated by research on the street. Officer survey data from Sacramento, California; Richmond, Virginia; and Roanoke County, Virginia suggest prospects and challenges for advancing evide...
Article
Full-text available
After reviewing the evidence regarding the general effectiveness of hot spots policing (what we know), we focus on areas where new knowledge must be developed (what we need to know). These include the importance of considering the impact of hot spots approaches on non-spatial displacement; assessing what strategies are most effective in addressing...
Article
Available data make it impossible to reach strong conclusions about the role of policing in the New York crime decline. Instead, we examine whether innovations implemented in New York fit with what is known about effective policing strategies. Our main analysis focuses on how the New York City Police Department (NYPD) could have continued to contri...
Article
Full-text available
We build upon previous reviews of the police effectiveness literature to categorize strategies and tactics based on what police should and should not be doing. We also provide relevant information on what police agencies should be doing to implement effective strategies. We argue police should be focusing on hot spots policing, problem-oriented pol...
Article
Evidence-based policing—using research and scientific processes to inform police decisions—is a complex approach to policing that involves various challenges. One primary difficulty is how research can be translated into digestible and familiar forms for practitioners. A central part of successful translation is the receptivity of decisionmakers to...
Article
Hot spots policing has been shown to be an effective strategy for reducing crime across a number of rigorous evaluations, but despite this strong body of research, there still exist gaps in our knowledge of how officers can best respond to hot spots. We report on a randomized experiment in Sacramento, California that begins to address these gaps by...
Article
Full-text available
Objectives Systematically review and synthesize the existing research on community-oriented policing to identify its effects on crime, disorder, fear, citizen satisfaction, and police legitimacy. Methods We searched a broad range of databases, websites, and journals to identify eligible studies that measured pre-post changes in outcomes in treatmen...
Article
This study examines whether the acquisition of a four‐year college degree impacts police officer attitudes toward abuse of authority. This research also explores whether level of higher education and the timing of degree completion alter this potential attitudinal impact of a bachelor’s degree. Using data from a nationally representative survey sam...
Article
Full-text available
In this chapter we argue that place based policing is not only effective but is also an efficient approach for the police. We present a growing body of evidence that suggests that police efforts to combat crime at small places represent an opportunity to increase the efficiency of police strategies to control crime and disorder.
Article
Full-text available
The next phase of evidence-based policing requires both scholars and practitioners to move from lists of specific studies about “what works” to using that information strategically. This requires developing generalizations or principles on the nature of effective police strategies and translating the field of police evaluation research into digesti...
Article
Full-text available
Research Summary We conducted a Campbell systematic review to examine the effectiveness of problem-oriented policing (POP) in reducing crime and disorder. After an exhaustive search strategy that identified more than 5,500 articles and reports, we found only ten methodologically rigorous evaluations that met our inclusion criteria. Using meta-analy...
Article
In recent years multiple studies have used citation analysis as a way to examine the most cited scholars and works in criminology and criminal justice and its subfields. This study is the first to focus on the most cited randomized experiments in criminological research. Using citation counts from both Social Science Citation Index and Google Schol...
Article
Full-text available
This review represents the sixth in an annual special feature in Police Practice and Research: An International Journal. It provides a cross‐sectional analysis of the police literature for 2005, with a focus on the substantive categories, publication medium, and methodological typology of such literature. This paper also comments on reviews of year...

Projects

Project (1)