Clinton W Epps

Clinton W Epps
Oregon State University | OSU · Department of Fisheries and Wildlife

Ph.D.

About

129
Publications
39,031
Reads
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4,371
Citations
Citations since 2016
81 Research Items
2884 Citations
20162017201820192020202120220100200300400500
20162017201820192020202120220100200300400500
20162017201820192020202120220100200300400500
20162017201820192020202120220100200300400500
Additional affiliations
July 2020 - present
Oregon State University
Position
  • Professor (Full)
Description
  • Research, teaching
July 2014 - June 2020
Oregon State University
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
Description
  • Research, teaching
June 2008 - June 2014
Oregon State University
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
Description
  • Assistant Professor, research and teaching

Publications

Publications (129)
Article
Animal species living in small populations with small ranges may be particularly vulnerable to habitat loss and fragmentation. We investigated genetic population structure of the camas pocket gopher (Thomomys bulbivorus), a species endemic to the Willamette Valley, Oregon, an area strongly affected by human development. Pocket gophers collected acr...
Article
Full-text available
Age-and sex-specific survival estimates are crucial to understanding important life history characteristics, and variation in these estimates can be a key driver of population dynamics. When estimating survival using Cormack-Jolly-Seber (CJS) models, emigration is typically unknown but confounded with apparent survival. Consequently, especially for...
Article
Full-text available
In recent years, emerging sequencing technologies and computational tools have driven a tidal wave of research on host-associated microbiomes, particularly the gut microbiome. These studies demonstrate numerous connections between the gut microbiome and vital host functions, primarily in humans, model organisms, and domestic animals. As the adaptiv...
Preprint
Full-text available
Age-and sex-specific survival estimates are crucial to understanding important life-7 history characteristics and variation in these estimates can be a key driver of population 8 dynamics. We used 9 years of annual mark-recapture data to estimate age-, sex-, and time-specific apparent survival of Humboldt's flying squirrels (Glaucomys oregonensis)...
Article
Cryptic, nocturnal or rare species pose a conservation challenge. Aardvarks (Orycteropus afer) occur across sub-Saharan Africa, but local or regional distribution is frequently unclear. We investigated the habitat relationships of aardvarks within Kruger National Park, South Africa, using non-invasive driving and walking surveys of aardvark sign. W...
Article
American beaver (Castor canadensis) have been translocated for population restoration, reduction of human‐wildlife conflict, and enhancement of ecosystem function. Yet few studies have assessed dispersal of beaver, making it difficult to determine at what scale translocations are appropriate. Genetic studies can provide inferences about gene flow,...
Article
Wildlife conservationists and managers often need to estimate abundance and demographic parameters to monitor the status of populations, and to ensure that these populations are meeting management goals. DNA capture-recapture surveys have become increasingly common in situations where physical surveys are consistently difficult or counts are small...
Article
Full-text available
Mystery solved? Chromosomal sex determination arises when an autosomal locus acquires a sex-determining function. In some taxa, this process occurs often. The XY system in mammals, however, has been evolutionarily stable across a wide array of species. Fifty years ago, a variation on this norm was described in the creeping vole ( Microtus oregoni )...
Article
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A 2013 outbreak of respiratory disease in bighorn sheep from California's Mojave Desert metapopulation caused high mortality in at least one population. Subsequent PCR and strain-typing indicate widespread infection of a single strain of Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae throughout this region. Serosurvey of archived samples showed that some populations hav...
Article
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Determining the demographic impacts of wildlife disease is complex because extrinsic and intrinsic drivers of survival, reproduction, body condition, and other factors that may interact with disease vary widely. Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae infection has been linked to persistent mortality in juvenile bighorn sheep ( Ovis canadensis ), although mortali...
Article
Full-text available
Wildlife managers often need to estimate population abundance to make well‐informed decisions. However, obtaining such estimates can be difficult and costly, particularly for species with small populations, wide distributions, and spatial clustering of individuals. For this reason, DNA surveys and capture–recapture modeling has become increasingly...
Article
Full-text available
Assessments of organisms’ vulnerability to potential climatic shifts are increasingly common. Such assessments are often conducted at the species level and focused primarily on the magnitude of anticipated climate change (i.e., climate exposure). However, wildlife management would benefit from population-level assessments that also incorporate meas...
Article
Beginning in the early 1900s, poly‐factorial, poly‐microbial pneumonia was identified as a disease affecting bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) and it continues to threaten bighorn populations, posing an ongoing management challenge. In May and June 2013, a pneumonia outbreak linked to the pathogen Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae led to an all‐age die‐off of...
Article
Full-text available
Studies in laboratory animals demonstrate important relationships between environment, host traits, and microbiome composition. However, host-microbiome relationships in natural systems are understudied. Here, we investigate metapopulation-scale microbiome variation in a wild mammalian host, the desert bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis nelsoni). We so...
Article
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Red deer (Cervus elaphus) throughout central Europe are influenced by different anthropogenic activities including habitat fragmentation, selective hunting and translocations. This has substantial impacts on genetic diversity and the long-term conservation of local populations of this species. Here we use genetic samples from 480 red deer individua...
Article
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Background: Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have roles in gene regulation, epigenetics, and molecular scaffolding and it is hypothesized that they underlie some mammalian evolutionary adaptations. However, for many mammalian species, the absence of a genome assembly precludes the comprehensive identification of lncRNAs. The genome of the American be...
Article
Full-text available
Knowledge of the spatiotemporal variability of abundance and vital rates is essential to the conservation of wildlife populations. In Pacific Northwest forests, previous small mammal research has focused on estimating abundance; few studies have focused on vital rates. We used robust design temporal symmetry models and live-trapping data collected...
Article
Pacific marten (Martes caurina) populations have become fragmented and constricted throughout their western range, often due to factors such as increased severity of wildfires and timber harvesting. Future population declines are predicted given decreasing snow packs and changes in vegetation communities. One element of marten habitat, rest and den...
Chapter
Full-text available
Habitat fragmentation, land use practices, and flow impediments modify the natural course of rivers, disrupting connectivity and subsequently affecting dispersal and gene flow in aquatic organisms. Many of the relationships between the physical river network and the genetic structure of populations are not well understood. Riverscape genetics is a...
Article
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Live trapping is a common tool used to assess demography of small mammals. However, live-trapping is often expensive and stressful to captured individuals. Thus, assessing the relative tradeoffs among study goals, project expenses, and animal well-being is necessary. Here, we evaluated how apparent bias and precision of estimates for apparent annua...
Article
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Accounting for within-species variability in the relationship between occurrence and climate is essential to forecasting species’ responses to climate change. Few climate-vulnerability assessments explicitly consider intraspecific variation, and those that do typically assume that variability is best explained by genetic affinity. Here, we evaluate...
Article
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The early occupation of America The Cooper's Ferry archaeological site in western North America has provided evidence for the pattern and time course of the early peopling of the Americas. Davis et al. describe new evidence of human activity from this site, including stemmed projectile points. Radiocarbon dating and Bayesian analysis indicate an ag...
Article
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Phylogeny and characteristics of ruminants Ruminants are a diverse group of mammals that includes families containing well-known taxa such as deer, cows, and goats. However, their evolutionary relationships have been contentious, as have the origins of their distinctive digestive systems and headgear, including antlers and horns (see the Perspectiv...
Article
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Dispersal facilitates population health and maintains resilience in species via gene flow. Adult dispersal occurs in some species, is often facultative, and is poorly understood, but has important management implications, particularly with respect to disease spread. Although the role of adult dispersal in spreading disease has been documented, the...
Article
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Many models used to estimate nutritional carrying capacity (NCC) for ungulates differ structurally, but the implications of those differences are frequently unclear. We present a comparative analysis of NCC estimates for a large herbivore in a dynamic landscape, using models that differ in structure and scope. We compared three model structures acr...
Article
Translocation is an important management tool that has been used for >50 years in Arizona, USA, to increase bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) population densities and to restore herds to suitable habitat throughout their historical range. Yet, translocation can also alter the underlying genetic diversity and spatial structure of managed wildlife spec...
Article
Full-text available
Effective conservation and management of small mammals require knowledge of the population dynamics of co‐occurring species. We estimated the abundances, autocorrelations, and spatiotemporal associations of 4 small‐mammal species from 2011–2016 using live‐trapping mark‐recapture methods on 9 sites across elevation and canopy openness gradients of a...
Data
Pearson’s correlation coefficients for a priori spatial variables estimated once during 2016 on our sites across the H. J. Andrews Experimental Forest, Oregon, USA. We removed variables from consideration for the same demographic parameter if the correlation coefficient was >0.8 or <−0.8. The variable CWD is the site-level average coarse woody debr...
Data
Pearson’s correlation coefficients for a priori temporal variables. We used weather recordings from the Central Meteorological Station in the H. J. Andrews Experimental Forest, Oregon, USA, during 2011–2016. We removed variables from consideration for the same demographic parameter if the correlation coefficient was >0.8 or <−0.8.
Data
Year- and grid-specific average body masses of adults and juveniles and proportion of adult males to adult females for Humboldt’s flying squirrels (HFS), Townsend’s chipmunks (TC), western red-backed voles (WRBV), and deer mice (DM) in a late-successional forest in the H. J. Andrews Experimental Forest, Oregon, USA, during 2011–2016. In the ratio c...
Article
Full-text available
Supplementary material for Davis et al. (2019) Science paper "Late Upper Paleolithic occupation at Cooper’s Ferry, Idaho, USA, ~16,000 years ago"
Article
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Aim: Environmental changes that amplify rates of site or patch occupancy turnover can increase risks of decline in spatially-structured populations. We asked whether local habitat and meso-scale climate influenced site occupancy turnover rates in four American pika (Ochotona princeps) metapopulations. We focused on winter cold stress, which is a pr...
Article
Full-text available
Genetic variation is the basis upon which natural selection acts to yield evolutionary change. In a rapidly changing environment, increasing genetic variation should increase evolutionary potential, particularly for small, isolated populations. However, the introduction of new alleles, either through natural or human-mediated processes, may have un...
Data
Mitochondrial DNA primer and sequence details. (DOCX)
Data
Results from population genetic Structure, hzar, and newhybrids analysis of American pikas within Rocky Mountain National Park, based on 22 microsatellite loci. (DOCX)
Data
Microsatellite genotypes and sampling localities. (CSV)
Article
Full-text available
Understanding species’ site use patterns is important for conservation and human–wildlife conflict mitigation where humans, livestock and large carnivores coexist. We used occupancy models and interviews to evaluate site use by medium and large carnivores within the rural Meibae Community Conservancy and agriculturally-developed Salama areas of Ken...
Article
Determining how species move across complex and fragmented landscapes and interact with human‐made barriers is a major research focus in conservation. Studies estimating functional connectivity from movement, dispersal, or gene flow usually rely on a single study period, and rarely consider variation over time. We contrasted genetic structure and g...
Article
Full-text available
Traditional analysis in population genetics evaluates differences among groups of individuals and, in some cases, considers the effects of distance or potential barriers to gene flow. Genetic variation of organisms in complex landscapes, seascapes, or riverine systems, however, may be shaped by many forces. Recent research has linked habitat hetero...
Article
Full-text available
Ecoimmunology is a burgeoning field of ecology which studies immune responses in wildlife by utilizing general immune assays such as the detection of natural antibody. Unlike adaptive antibodies, natural antibodies are important in innate immune responses and often recognized conserved epitopes present in pathogens. Here, we describe a procedure fo...
Data
Data from individual animals in this study including bighorn sheep range, sex, calculated bacterial killing activity (BKA), and ELISA data of nAb levels reactive to V. corralliilyticus cellular envelopes is included. (XLSX)
Article
Full-text available
Landscape genetic studies based on neutral genetic markers have contributed to our understanding of the influence of landscape composition and configuration on gene flow and genetic variation. However, the potential for species to adapt to changing landscapes will depend on how natural selection influences adaptive genetic variation. We demonstrate...
Data
Sensitivity to simulation time frame. (PDF)
Data
Individual genotypes and sampling coordinates for southern Mojave region. (CSV)
Data