Cleo Bertelsmeier

Cleo Bertelsmeier
University of Lausanne | UNIL · Department of Ecology and Evolution

PhD

About

49
Publications
43,415
Reads
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4,167
Citations
Additional affiliations
January 2015 - present
University of Lausanne
Position
  • PostDoc Position
April 2014 - October 2014
University of Adelaide
Position
  • PostDoc Position
October 2010 - December 2013
Université Paris-Sud 11
Position
  • PhD
Education
September 2009 - July 2010
September 2006 - July 2009
University of Oxford
Field of study

Publications

Publications (49)
Article
Biological invasions are a major threat to biodiversity, agriculture and human health. Invasive populations can be the source of additional new introductions, leading to a self-accelerating process whereby “invasion begets invasion”. This phenomenon, coined “bridgehead effect”, has been proposed to stem from the evolution of higher invasiveness in...
Article
Full-text available
The globalization of trade and human movement has resulted in the accidental dispersal of thousands of alien species worldwide at an unprecedented scale. Some of these species are considered invasive because of their extensive spatial spread or negative impacts on native biodiversity. Explaining which alien species become invasive is a major challe...
Article
Full-text available
The pet trade has become a multibillion-dollar global business, with tens of millions of animals traded annually. Pets are sometimes released by their owners or escape, and can become introduced outside of their native range, threatening biodiversity, agriculture, and health. So far, a comprehensive analysis of invasive species traded as pets is la...
Article
Full-text available
Globalisation has facilitated the spread of alien species, and some of them have significant impacts on biodiversity and human societies. It is commonly thought that biological invasions have accelerated continuously over the last centuries, following increasing global trade. However, the world experienced two distinct waves of globalisation (~1820...
Article
Predictions of future biological invasions often rely on the assumption that introduced species establish only under climatic conditions similar to those in their native range. To date, 135 studies have tested this assumption of 'niche conservatism', yielding contradictory results. Here we revisit this literature, consider the evidence for niche sh...
Article
Aim: Lepidoptera is a highly diverse, predominantly herbivorous insect order, with species transported to outside their native range largely facilitated by the global trade of plants and plant-based goods. Analogous to island disharmony, we examine invasion disharmony, where species filtering during invasions increases systematic compositional diff...
Article
Globalization has led to the unintentional movement of thousands of species around the world, necessitating a better understanding of how species are spread by international trade to prevent new invasions. However, to date, the evidence implicating global trade in intercontinental species flows has been mixed. Here, we show that commonly used proxi...
Article
Full-text available
Aim Predictions of future species distributions rest on the assumption that climatic conditions in the current range reflect fundamental niche requirements. So far, it remains unclear to what extent this is true. We tested if three important factors determining fundamental niche—ecophysiology, morphology and evolutionary history—can predict the rea...
Article
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Invasive species often displace native species by outcompeting them. Yet, some native species can persist even in heavily invaded areas. The mechanisms mediating this local coexistence are still unclear. Fine-scale microclimatic heterogeneity could promote the local coexistence of native and invasive animal competitors. We tested if native ant spec...
Article
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Aim A major goal of invasion biology is to understand global species flows between donor and recipient regions. Our current view of such flows assumes that species are moved directly from their native to their introduced range. However, if introduced populations serve as bridgehead populations that generate additional introductions, tracing interco...
Article
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Aim The concept of “island disharmony” has been widely applied to describe the systematic over- and under-representation of taxa on islands compared to mainland regions. Here, we explore an extension of that concept to biological invasions. We compare biogeographical patterns in native and non-native beetle (Coleoptera) assemblages from around the...
Article
As part of national biosecurity programs, cargo imports, passenger baggage and international mail are inspected at ports of entry to verify compliance with phytosanitary regulations and to directly intercept potentially damaging non‐native species to prevent their introduction. Detection of organisms during inspections may also provide crucial info...
Article
Social insects are among the worst invasive species and a better understanding of their anthropogenic spread is needed. I highlight recent research demonstrating that social insects have been dispersed since the early beginnings of globalized trade and in particular after the Industrial Revolution, following two waves of globalization. Many species...
Article
Full-text available
Globalization is removing dispersal barriers for the establishment of invasive species and enabling their spread to novel climates. New thermal environments in the invaded range will be particularly challenging for ectotherms, as their metabolism directly depends on environmental temperature. However, we know little about the role climatic niche sh...
Article
Full-text available
Despite the enormous negative consequences of biological invasions, we have a limited understanding of how spatial demography during invasions creates population patterns observed at different spatial scales. Early stages of invasions, arrival and establishment, are considered distinct from the later stage of spread, but the processes of population...
Article
Full-text available
It is extraordinary to witness the spread of COVID-19 almost in real-time. This tight monitoring of the invasion of a new virus is a situation that most other invasion scientists could only dream of. Especially spatiotemporal spread data of the early phases of an invasion would be extremely useful in order to understand and predict the human-mediat...
Article
Central to the problem of biological invasions, human activities introduce species beyond their native ranges and participate in their subsequent spread. Understanding human-mediated dispersal is therefore crucial for both predicting and preventing invasions. Here, we show that decomposing human-mediated dispersal into three temporal phases: depart...
Article
Full-text available
The resilience of an individual to environmental change depends on its ability to respond adaptively. Phenotypic flexibility, i.e., reversible phenotypic plasticity, is such an adaptive response, which has been predicted to evolve in unpredictable environments. We present data on the environmental predictability for 17 generations of socially flexi...
Article
Full-text available
Impacts of climate change are likely to be marked in areas with steep climatic transitions. Species turnover, spread of invasive species, altered productivity, and modified processes such as fire regimes can all spread rapidly along ecotones, which challenge the current paradigms of ecosystem management. We conducted a literature review at a contin...
Article
Biological invasions are a major threat to biological diversity, agriculture, and human health. To predict and prevent new invasions, it is crucial to develop a better understanding of the drivers of the invasion process. The analysis of 4,533 border interception events revealed that at least 51 different alien ant species were intercepted at US po...
Article
Full-text available
Criticism has been levelled at climate-change-induced forecasts of species range shifts that do not account explicitly for complex population dynamics. The relative importance of such dynamics under climate change is, however, undetermined because direct tests comparing the performance of demographic models vs. simpler ecological niche models are s...
Article
Many species show intraspecific variation in their social organization (IVSO), which means the composition of their social groups can change between solitary living, pair living, or living in groups. Understanding IVSO is important because it demonstrates species resilience to environmental change and can help us to study ultimate and proximate rea...
Article
Human trade and travel are breaking down biogeographic barriers, resulting in shifts in the geographical distribution of organ- isms, yet it remains largely unknown whether different alien species generally follow similar spatiotemporal colonization patterns and how such patterns are driven by trends in global trade. Here, we analyse the global dis...
Article
Full-text available
Identifying the factors that promote the success of biological invasions is a key pursuit in ecology. To date, the link between animal personality and invasiveness has rarely been studied. Here, we examined in the laboratory how Argentine ant populations from the species’ native and introduced ranges differed in a suite of behaviours related to spe...
Article
Termites are ubiquitous insects in tropical, subtropical, and warm temperate regions and play an important role in ecosystems. Several termite species are also significant economic pests, mainly in urban areas where they attack human-made structures, but also in natural forest habitats. Worldwide, approximately 28 termite species are considered inv...
Article
Biological invasions have been unambiguously shown to be one of the major global causes of biodiversity loss. Despite the magnitude of this threat and recent scientific advances, this field remains a regular target of criticism - from outright deniers of the threat to scientists questioning the utility of the discipline. This unique situation, comb...
Article
Full-text available
The advent of simple and affordable tools for molecular identification of novel insect invaders and assessment of population diversity has changed the face of invasion biology in recent years. The widespread application of these tools has brought with it an emerging understanding that patterns in biogeography, introduction history and subsequent mo...
Article
Full-text available
Climate change affects the rate of insect invasions as well as the abundance, distribution and impacts of such invasions on a global scale. Among the principal analytical approaches to predicting and understanding future impacts of biological invasions are Species Distribution Models (SDMs), typically in the form of correlative Ecological Niche Mod...
Article
Among invasive species, ants are a particularly prominent group with enormous impacts on native biodiversity and ecosystem functioning. Globalization and ongoing climate change are likely to increase the rate of ant invasions in the future, leading to simultaneous introductions of several highly invasive species within the same area. Here, we inves...
Article
Climate change and biological invasions are among the greatest threats to biodiversity, and their impacts might increase by the end of this century. Among invasive species, ants are a prominent group due to their negative impacts on native species, ecosystem processes, human and animal health, agro-ecosystems, and the economy. Ants are expected to...
Article
Full-text available
Ants are among the most problematic invasive species. They displace numerous native species, alter ecosystem processes, and can have negative impacts on agriculture and human health. In part, their success might stem from a departure from the discovery–dominance trade-off that can promote coexistence in native ant communities, that is, invasive ant...
Article
Ants figure prominently among the worst invasive species because of their enormous ecological and economic impacts. However, it remains to be investigated which species would be behaviourally dominant when confronted with another invasive ant species, should two species be introduced in the same area. In the future, many regions might have suitable...
Article
1. Documenting the range size and range boundaries of species, and understanding the factors determining changes in these spatial components, is crucial given current rates of anthropogenic climate change and habitat loss. Here, we document the establishment of the acraeine butterfly, Acraea terpsicore, in South-East Asia (Indonesian islands south...
Article
Many ants are among the most globally significant invasive species. They have caused the local decline and extinction of a variety of taxa ranging from plants to mam- mals. They disturb ecosystem processes, decrease agricultural production, damage infra- structure and can be a health hazard for humans. Overall, economic costs caused by invasive ant...
Article
Full-text available
Following its introduction from Asia to the USA, the Asian needle ant (Pachycondyla chinensis) is rapidly spreading into a wide range of habitats with great negative ecological affects. In addition, the species is a concern for human health because of its powerful, sometimes deadly, sting. Here, we assessed the potential of P. chinensis to spread f...
Article
As climatically suitable range projections become increasingly used to assess distributions of species, we recommend systematic assessments of the quality of habitat in addition to the classical binary classification of habitat. We devised a method to assess occurrence probability, captured by a climatic suitability index, through which we could de...
Article
Climate change and invasive species are two of the most serious threats of biodiversity. A general concern is that these threats interact, and that a globally warming climate could favour invasive species. In this study we investigate the invasive potential of one of the ''100 of the world's worst invasive species'', the big-headed ant Pheidole meg...
Article
Full-text available
Biological invasions are among the greatest threats to global biodiversity, but in contrast to most other global threats, they suffer from specific communication issues. Our paper presents the first new addition to the widely cited IUCN list of ''100 of the world's worst invasive species'', a list created a decade ago in response to these communica...
Article
We developed a database of 24 major ecological char-acteristics of ants – "Ant Profiler" – which includes information on species morphology, colony dynamics, behaviour, habitat, nest-ing sites, diet, species interactions and distribution. Our database is a publically available research tool to study the ecology of ants and relies on the contributio...
Article
Full-text available
Ants are among the worst invasive species, and can have tremendous negative impacts on native biodiversity, agriculture, estates, property and human health. Invasive ants are extremely difficult to control, and thus early detection is essential to prevent ant invasions, in particular through surveillance efforts at ports of entry. This paper assess...
Article
Many studies in recent years have investigated the effects of climate change on the future of biodiversity. In this review, we first examine the different possible effects of climate change that can operate at individual, population, species, community, ecosystem and biome scales, notably showing that species can respond to climate change challenge...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
There are more than 12.000 described species of ants living on every landmass on Earth but Antarctica. They are ubiquitous and dominant members of most ecosystems. A small subset of these species has become invasive following human-mediated transportation and have been shown to displace numerous native species, alter communities and disrupt crucial...

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Projects (2)
Project
1. How species distributions are changing (native range versus new observed range)? 2. Does a country’s geopolitical history during past waves of globalization determine the number and diversity of invasive species that have established there? i.e. Are new observed distributions linked to past and present human histories (in the sense anthropogenic factors) and/or global changes (in the sense environmental factors).