Clemence Poirotte

Clemence Poirotte
French National Centre for Scientific Research | CNRS · Centre d'Ecologie Fonctionnelle et Evolutive

MS in Biology Ecology Evolution

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15
Publications
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273
Citations

Publications

Publications (15)
Preprint
Behavioral discrimination of kin is a key process structuring social relationships in animals. In this study, we provide a first example of discrimination towards non-kin by third-parties through a mechanism of phenotype matching. In mandrills, we recently demonstrated increased facial resemblance among paternally-related juvenile and adult females...
Preprint
Kin discrimination is a key process structuring social relationships in animals. We show how it may be generalized to entail discrimination towards non-kin, and provide a first example of this process in a primate. In mandrills, we recently demonstrated increased facial resemblance among paternally-related females indicating adaptive opportunities...
Article
Objectives Parasite selection pressures have driven the evolution of numerous behavioral defenses in host species, but recent studies revealed individual variation in their expression. As little is known about the factors causing heterogeneity among individuals in infection-avoidance behaviors, we investigated in woolly monkeys (Lagothrix lagotrich...
Article
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Many animals rely on facial traits to recognize their kin; however, whether these traits have been selected specifically for this function remains unknown. Using deep learning for face recognition, we present the first evidence that interindividual facial resemblance has been selected to signal paternal kinship. Mandrills ( Mandrillus sphinx ) live...
Article
Several species mitigate relationships according to their conspecifics' parasite status. Yet, this defence strategy comes with the costs of depriving individuals from valuable social bonds. Animals therefore face a trade-off between the costs of pathogen exposure and the benefits of social relationships. According to the models of social evolution,...
Preprint
Full-text available
Animal faces convey important information such as individual health status or identity. Human and nonhuman primates rely on highly heritable facial traits to recognize their kin. However, whether these facial traits have evolved for this specific function of kin recognition remains unknown. We present the first unambiguous evidence that inter-indiv...
Article
Detecting the risk of infection and minimizing parasite exposure represent the first lines of host defence against parasites. Individuals differ in the expression of these behavioural defences, but causes of such variation have received little empirical attention. We therefore experimentally investigated the effects of several individual and enviro...
Article
Full-text available
Animals have evolved a wide range of behaviours that act as barriers to decrease the risk of parasite infection. Faecal avoidance may, for example, limit contact with orofaecally transmitted parasites, such as gastrointestinal nematodes. When present in faeces, however, nematode eggs need to mature before reaching their infective stage. If strategi...
Article
Understanding animal movements is a key prerequisite for deciphering ecological processes such as population dynamics, community structure or biological invasions. Many animals restrict their movements to certain areas (home ranges) by alternating visits among several suitable sites. The dynamics of these recursive movements are assumed to be prima...
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Full-text available
Coproscopical methods like sedimentation and flotation techniques are widely used in the field for studying simian gastrointestinal parasites. Four parasites of known zoonotic potential were studied in a free-ranging, non-provisioned population of mandrills (Mandrillus sphinx): 2 nematodes (Necatoramericanus/Oesophagostomum sp. complex and Strongyl...
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Full-text available
The evolutionary transition from a solitary to a social lifestyle entails an elevated parasite cost because the social proximity associated with group living favors parasite transmission. Despite this cost, sociality is widespread in a large range of taxonomic groups. In this context, hosts would be expected to have evolved behavioral mechanisms to...
Article
Full-text available
Fecal samples from captive and free-living lemurs at Ivoloina Zoological Park (IZP) and domestic carnivores from six villages surrounding IZP were evaluated between July and August 2012. Free-living lemurs from Betampona Natural Reserve (BNR), a relatively pristine rainforest fragment 40 km away, were also evaluated in November 2013. All 33 dogs sa...
Article
Parasites are sometimes capable of inducing phenotypic changes in their hosts to improve transmission [1 • Lefèvre T. • Lebarbenchon C. • Gauthier-Clerc M. • Missé D. • Poulin R. • Thomas F. The ecological significance of manipulative parasites.Trends Ecol. Evol. 2009; 24: 41-48 • Abstract • Full Text • Full Text PDF • PubMed • Scopus (171) • Goo...
Article
Full-text available
Objectives: Parasites are ubiquitous and evolve fast. Therefore, they represent major selective forces acting on their hosts by influencing many aspects of their biology. Humans are no exception, as they share many parasites with animals and some of the most important outbreaks come from primates. While it appears important to understand the facto...

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