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Claudio Manuel Monteza-Moreno

Claudio Manuel Monteza-Moreno
Max Planck Institute of Animal Behavior · Department for the Ecology of Animal Societies

Master of Science in Animal Behavior
Doctoral student at the Max Planck Institute of Animal Behavior, Germany.

About

17
Publications
5,332
Reads
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101
Citations
Citations since 2016
16 Research Items
101 Citations
2016201720182019202020212022010203040
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2016201720182019202020212022010203040
Introduction
I am a Ph.D. student at the Max Planck Institute of Animal Behavior and the University of Konstanz, and an affiliated researcher of the Coiba Scientific Station, Coiba-AIP. I currently work in topics related to Behavior, Ecology and Natural history of forest mammals, particularly, the White-faced Capuchins, Northern Olingo. I work in Coiba National Park, the Panama Canal Watershed and the montane forest of western Panama, using camera traps as preferred method.
Additional affiliations
April 2018 - present
Coiba-AIP Scientific Station
Position
  • Research Associate
Description
  • Grad student associated working on behavior and ecological aspects of the mammalian community in Coiba National Park
August 2017 - December 2019
University of California, Davis
Position
  • Master's Student
December 2013 - July 2017
Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute
Position
  • Research Assistant
Description
  • Coordinator for TEAM-BCI http://www.teamnetwork.org/

Publications

Publications (17)
Article
Full-text available
The Amazon forest has the highest biodiversity on Earth. However, information on Amazonian vertebrate diversity is still deficient and scattered across the published, peer-reviewed, and gray literature and in unpublished raw data. Camera traps are an effective non-invasive method of surveying vertebrates, applicable to different scales of time and...
Article
Full-text available
The Amazon forest has the highest biodiversity on earth. However, information on Amazonian vertebrate diversity is still deficient and scattered across the published, peer‐reviewed and grey literature and in unpublished raw data. Camera traps are an effective non‐invasive method of surveying vertebrates, applicable to different scales of time and s...
Article
Full-text available
Epiphytic lifestyles have evolved independently in ecologically, morphologically, and taxonomically diverse plant species. Although this adaptation is widespread among angiosperms, it is only known to have arisen in a single gymnosperm species, Zamia pseudoparasitica (Cycadophyta). Zamia pseudoparasitica is endemic to the mountains of Western Panam...
Article
Full-text available
Porthidium lansbergii is a relatively abundant pit viper in semiarid environments from eastern Panama, through the Caribbean plains and Magdalena Valley in Colombia to northeastern Venezuela. Like other members of this genus, P. lansbergii exhibits great variation in scutellation and other morphological characters, a situation that has complicated...
Article
Full-text available
The Isthmus of Panama, the narrowest land bridge between North and South America, is surrounded by a large number of islands (>1500) relatively close to the mainland. However, despite the potential role Panamanian islands have for the conservation of bird species, most avian surveys are conducted on the mainland. The islands of Jicarón and Jicarita...
Article
Full-text available
An arboreal lifestyle is thought to be central to primate origins, and most extant primate species still live in the trees. Nonetheless, terrestrial locomotion is a widespread adaptation that has arisen repeatedly within the primate lineage. The absence of terrestriality among the New World monkeys (Platyrrhini) is thus notable and raises questions...
Poster
Full-text available
The absence of terrestriality among New World monkeys is notable and raises questions about the ecological pressures that constrain the expansion of platyrrhines into terrestrial niches. We took advantage of a natural experiment to test the hypothesis that terrestrial predators constrain primates’ exploitation of terrestrial niches. We used camera...
Article
Full-text available
Propias del Neotrópico, las abejas de las orquídeas habitan desde el nivel del mar hasta más de los 2000 m, y desempeñan un importante papel como polinizadoras de orquídeas y de otras plantas. El estudio tiene como objetivo conocer la diversidad de estas abejas en dicha zona del país. Se realizó un estudio durante cinco años consecutivos, de 2013 a...
Article
Full-text available
Habitual reliance on tool use is a marked behavioural difference between wild robust (genus Sapajus) and gracile (genus Cebus) capuchin monkeys. Despite being well studied and having a rich repertoire of social and extractive foraging traditions, Cebus sp. rarely use tools and have never been observed using stone tools. By contrast, habitual tool u...
Preprint
Full-text available
Habitual reliance on tool use is a marked behavioral difference between wild robust (genus Sapajus ) and gracile (genus Cebus ) capuchin monkeys. Despite being well studied and having a rich repertoire of social and extractive foraging traditions, Cebus sp have rarely been observed engaging in tool use and have never been reported to use stone tool...
Poster
Full-text available
Ocelots (Leopardus pardalis) are elusive mid-sized Neotropical predators that are important in a variety of ecosystems but difficult to study. At the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute in Panama, authors JG and GW conducted a long-term (1982–2017) mammal census based on trail transect techniques to understand population variations of diurnal s...

Questions

Question (1)
Question
If you need a distribution map from a book, how do people deal with that? Do u email authors to obtain the layers or is there a way to export the polygons from the book images?
Colleagues and I need the polygons of the whole distribution of two #snake vipers: Porthidium nasutum and lansbergii. This goes from Mexico, thru Central America, to Venezuela/Colombia/Ecuador, so it isn't as simple as creating the polygons by "hand".

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