Claudio R. Lazzari

Claudio R. Lazzari
University of Tours | UFR · Insect Biology Research Institute

Dr. Sc.

About

183
Publications
32,434
Reads
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Citations
Introduction
I am a behavioural physiologist, devoted to the study of the adaptations of arthropods to the haematophagous way of life. My approach includes methods and concepts of functional morphology, integrative physiology and neuro-ethology.
Additional affiliations
December 2015 - present
Universidad de Buenos Aires
Position
  • Professor
January 2009 - present
National Scientific and Technical Research Council
Position
  • Corresponding Fellow
October 2003 - March 2020
University of Tours
Position
  • Professor
Description
  • I teach Animal Physiology, Animal Behaviour, Vector Biology, Behavioural Ecology and Neuroethology at the University and do my research at the Insect Biology Research Institut (CNRS).

Publications

Publications (183)
Article
The evolution of triatomine bugs towards haematophagy has demanded different types of adaptations, i.e., morphological, physiological and behavioural. In fact, haematophagy evolved as a secondary adaptation facilitated by frequent vertebrate contact. As derived from other Heteroptera, probably from an entomophagous group, some main morphological pr...
Article
Temperature is one of the most important factors affecting the life of insects [1 • Denlinger D.L. • Yocum G.D. Physiology of heat sensitivity.in: Hallman G.J. Denlinger D.L. Temperature Sensitivity in Insects and Application in Integrated Pest Management. Westview Press, Oxford, Boulder, CO1998: 7-53 • Google Scholar ]. For instance, high temper...
Article
Full-text available
ELife digest Many insect species have adopted the blood of birds and mammals as their main or even only food. Yet, blood is not freely available in nature, but it circulates inside vessels hidden under the skin of animals much bigger than the insect and capable of defending themselves from getting bitten. To succeed in getting a meal, blood-sucking...
Article
Seal lice are the unique insects diving in open sea. Experiments revealed that lice support 200 Kg/cm 2 , equivalent to 2000 m depth, revealing unique adaptations to survive extreme marine conditions. Abstract Lice from pinnipeds, i.e. sea lions, seals, and walruses, are the only insects capable of surviving marine dives. Along their evolutionary h...
Article
Full-text available
Insects are the most evolutionarily and ecologically successful group of living animals, being present in almost all possible mainland habitats; however, they are virtually absent in the ocean, which constitutes more than 99% of the Earth’s biosphere. Only a few insect species can be found in the sea but they remain at the surface, in salt marshes,...
Chapter
The nervous system of triatomines follows the general plan for insects in terms of organization. Yet, its anatomy is in line with the form of the different regions of the bug’s body. The brain is located in the posterior region of the elongated head, the cavity of which is mostly occupied by the cibarial pump. The ganglia composing the ventral nerv...
Chapter
Many arthropod species have adopted the blood of vertebrates as their main food. Blood is rich in nutrients and, except for the presence of parasites, otherwise sterile. This food, however, is not freely available nor is its obtention devoid of risk; it circulates inside vessels hidden underneath the skin of mobile hosts, which are able to defend t...
Article
The heat emitted by the host body constitutes a short distance orientation cue for most blood-sucking insects, as is the case of the kissing-bug Rhodnius prolixus. We evaluated here how kissing bugs assess the distance to a warm target, in order to reach it by displaying the Proboscis Extension Reflex (PER). We confronted blind-folded insects to a...
Article
Feeding on the blood of warm-blooded vertebrates is associated to thermal stress in haematophagous arthropods. It has been demonstrated that blood-sucking insects protect their physiological integrity either by synthesising heat-shock proteins or by means of thermoregulatory mechanisms. In this work, we describe the first thermoregulatory mechanism...
Article
Active searching for vertebrate blood is a necessary activity for haematophagous insects, and it can be assumed that this search should also be costly in terms of energetic expenditure. Either if it is by swimming, walking, running or flying, active movement requires energy, increasing metabolic rates relative to resting situations. We analysed the...
Preprint
The phlebotomine sand fly Lutzomyia longipalpis is the primary insect vector of visceral leishmaniasis in the Americas. For ectothermic organisms such as sand flies, the ambient temperature is a critical factor influencing all aspects of their life. However, the impact of temperature has been ignored in previous investigations of stress-induced res...
Preprint
Feeding on the blood of warm-blooded vertebrates is associated to thermal stress in haematophagous arthropods. It has been demonstrated that blood-sucking insects protect their physiological integrity either by synthesising heat-shock proteins or by means of thermoregulatory mechanisms. In this work, we describe the first thermoregulatory mechanism...
Preprint
Full-text available
Rhodnius prolixus is able to cool down the ingested blood during feeding on a warm-blooded host. This is possible because of a counter-current heat exchanger located in its head, which transfers heat from the warm blood to the insect haemolymph and can dissipate through the head cuticle. Given the key role haemolymph circulation in thermoregulation...
Poster
Full-text available
effects of a change in temperature on the circadian cycle of anopheline mosquitoes. Knock down temperature of Aedes aegypti and Anopheles gambiae. Does this knock-down temperature vary between sexes and at different times of the day/night cycle? Acknowledgements. This work was possible thanks to the support received by the Agence Nationale de la Re...
Article
Blood-sucking arthropods exploit multimodal information for locating and recognising potential hosts. The heat emitted by the body of endothermic vertebrates constitutes a major cue for orientation. To exploit it in a reliable way, insects must be able to deal with two variants of thermal information, that is heat exchange and temperature fluctuati...
Article
Blood feeding in arthropods has evolved in multiple lineages. This feeding preference provides a source of ample proteins and lipids for egg production and survival, but ingestion of a large warm blood-meal can boost the arthropod's body temperature 15°–20°C within seconds to minutes. This represents one of, if not the most, rapid thermal change do...
Article
Full-text available
The temperature of the environment is one of the most important abiotic factors affecting the life of insects. As poikilotherms, their body temperature is not constant, and they rely on various strategies to minimize the risk of thermal stress. They have been thus able to colonize a large spectrum of habitats. Mosquitoes, such as Ae. aegypti and Ae...
Article
Full-text available
Glyphosate is the most widely used herbicide in the world. In the last years, the number of studies revealing deleterious effects of glyphosate on non-target species has been increasing. We studied the impact of glyphosate at field-realistic doses on learning in mosquito larvae (Aedes aegypti). Larvae of A. aegypti live in small water bodies and pe...
Article
The increase in body temperature over that of the environment has been frequently reported in insects, in particular in relation with flight activity. Scarab beetles of the genus Cyclocephala living in tropical areas are known to exploit the heat produced by thermogenic plants, also producing heat by endothermy. Here, we report the first case of en...
Article
Kissing bugs possess a highly developed thermal sense and when starved, they attempt to bite any object which temperature is close to that of a warm-blooded host. At each feeding event, these insects take massive meals in just a few minutes. One could then expect fed-bugs being heated-up by the ingested warm blood and so becoming attractive to star...
Data
Source data of temperature in different parts of the body (P, proboscis; T, head; Th, thorax and A, abdomen) for different combinations of environment (16°C, 21°C, 26°C and 31°C) and blood temperature (32°C, 37°C and 42°C). Sheet 1 (T°C): raw data; sheet 2 (∆T°C) temperature difference between blood and the different parts of the insect body.
Data
Two-way ANOVA tables for the analysis of the impact of the temperature of the blood (Tblood) and the environmental temperature on the different body parts of Rhodnius prolixus during feeding. (See also Figure 2—figure supplement 1). From top to bottom, Ta = 16°C, 21°C, 26°C or 31°C.
Data
Source data and statistical analysis (t-test) of the expression of HSP70 and HSP90 in bugs which dorsal vessel was severed before feeding and sham operated animals. Sheet 1 (Data and t-test): raw data and statistical analysis; sheet 2 (Summary): summary of results and graph.
Article
Full-text available
Free-flying honeybees exhibit remarkable cognitive capacities but the neural underpinnings of these capacities cannot be studied in flying insects. Conversely, immobilized bees are accessible to neurobiological investigation but display poor visual learning. To overcome this limitation, we aimed at establishing a controlled visual environment in wh...
Article
The use of heat as a cue for the orientation of haematophagous insects towards hot-blooded hosts has been acknowledged for many decades. In mosquitoes, thermoreception has been studied at the molecular, physiological and behavioural levels, and the response to heat has been evaluated in multimodal contexts. However, a direct characterization of how...
Chapter
The blood of endothermic vertebrates constitutes the main, or even the only food for many arthropod species. Even though blood is a food rich in nutrients and in most cases sterile, its consumption is associated to many stressing factors. Energetic, thermal, osmotic and oxidative stresses are among the consequences for arthropods of the rapid inges...
Article
Although kissing bugs (Triatominae: Reduviidae) are perhaps best known as vectors of Chagas disease, they are important experimental models in studies of insect sensory physiology, pioneered by the seminal studies of Wigglesworth and Gillet more than eighty years ago. Since then, many investigations have revealed that the thermal, hygric, visual an...
Article
Triatominae are blood-sucking insects that localise their hosts using a range of sensory signals to find food, and among them, the heat emited by the hosts. Heat is one of the main short-range cues in vertebrate hosts, able to trigger alone the Proboscis Extension Response (PER) that precedes the bite. Previous studies demonstrated that heat respon...
Article
Full-text available
Major emergency efforts are being mounted for each vector-borne disease epidemiological crisis anew, while knowledge about the biology of arthropods vectors is dwindling slowly but continuously, as is the number of field entomologists. The discrepancy between the rates of production of knowledge and its use and need for solving crises is widening,...
Article
Learning and memory plays an important role in host preference and parasite transmission by disease vector insects. Historically there has been a dearth of standardized protocols that permit testing their learning abilities, thus limiting discussion on the potential epidemiological consequences of learning and memory to a largely speculative extent...
Article
Full-text available
Feeding on the blood of vertebrates is a risky task for haematophagous insects and it can be reasonably assumed that it should also be costly in terms of energetic expenditure. Blood circulates inside vessels and it must be pumped through narrow tubular stylets to be ingested. We analysed the respiratory pattern and the energetic cost of taking a b...
Article
Full-text available
The authors note that Angela B. Lange should be added to the author list between Leonardo B. Koerich and José Manuel Latorre-Estivalis, and Ian Orchard should be added to the author list between Sheila Ons and Lucia Pagola. Angela B. Lange and Ian Orchard should be credited with supplying sequencing samples and conducting gene annotation and supple...
Article
Full-text available
Rhodnius prolixus not only has served as a model organism for the study of insect physiology, but also is a major vector of Chagas disease, an illness that affects approximately seven million people worldwide. We sequenced the genome of R. prolixus, generated assembled sequences covering 95% of the genome (∼702 Mb), including 15,456 putative protei...
Article
Full-text available
Despite the drastic consequences it may have on the transmission of parasites, the ability of disease vectors to learn and retain information have just begun to be characterized. The kissing-bug Rhodnius prolixus, vectors of the Chagas disease, is an excellent model, particularly because conditioning the proboscis extension response (PER) constitut...
Article
Rhodnius prolixus not only has served as a model organism for the study of insect physiology, but also is a major vector of Chagas disease, an illness that affects approximately seven million people worldwide. We sequenced the genome of R. prolixus, generated assembled sequences covering 95% of the genome (∼702 Mb), including 15,456 putative protei...
Article
Insect repellents are known since many decades ago and constitute a major tool for personal protection against the biting of mosquitoes. Despite their wide use, the understanding of why and how repellents repel is relatively recent. In particular, the question about to what extent insects other than mosquitoes are repulsed by repellents remains ope...
Article
Full-text available
Prof. Josué Núñez passed away on August 19th 2014 at the age of 89. He was a pioneer in the field of insect physiology and a founder of the study of behavioural physiology in Argentina and other Latin-American countries such as Brazil and Venezuela. Josué was born in 1924, in the city of Tapalqué, a small town in the middle of the province of Bueno...
Article
Triatominae are blood-sucking insects that localise their hosts with their multimodal host associated perceptive signals. Among that sensory information, one of the main short-range cue is heat which, even in isolation, is able to trigger the Proboscis Extension Response (PER) preceding the bite. Previous studies have demonstrated a rhythmic variat...
Article
Full-text available
Bloodsucking bugs use infrared radiation (IR) for locating warmblooded hosts and are able to differentiate between infrared and temperature (T) stimuli. This paper is concerned with the neuronal coding of IR in the bug Rhodnius prolixus. Data obtained are from the warm cells in the peg-in-pit sensilla (PSw-cells) and in the tapered hairs (THw-cells...
Article
Full-text available
Triatomine bugs are the insect vectors of Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas disease. These insects are known to aggregate inside shelters during daylight hours and it has been demonstrated that within shelters, the aggregation is induced by volatiles emitted from bug feces. These signals promote inter-species aggregation among most...
Article
Full-text available
Thermoreceptors provide animals with background information about the thermal environment, which is at least indirectly a prerequisite for thermoregulation, and assists bloodsucking insects in the search for their host. Recordings from peg-in-pit sensilla and tapered hairs on the antennae of the bug Rhodnius prolixus revealed two physiologically di...
Data
Many arthropod species have adopted vertebrate blood as their main food source. Blood is rich in nutrients and, except for the presence of parasites, sterile. However, this food source is not freely available, nor is obtaining it devoid of risk. It circulates inside vessels hidden underneath the skin of mobile hosts that are able to defend themselv...
Article
Full-text available
Many arthropod species have adopted vertebrate blood as their main food source. Blood is rich in nutrients and, except for the presence of parasites, sterile. However, this food source is not freely available, nor is obtaining it devoid of risk. It circulates inside vessels hidden underneath the skin of mobile hosts that are able to defend themselv...
Article
Full-text available
Triatomines have been important model organisms for behavioural research. Diverse reports about triatomine host search, pheromone communication in the sexual, shelter and alarm contexts, daily cycles of activity, refuge choice and behavioural plasticity have been published in the last two decades. In recent times, a variety of molecular genetics te...
Article
Insects sense thermal cues mainly through thermoreceptors located in the antenna. To analyse the impact of antennectomy on the thermal behaviour of the haematophagous bug Triatoma infestans, we studied the distribution of intact and antennectomised bugs in an experimental arena where a temperature gradient was established, as well as the biting res...
Chapter
Full-text available
Available from: http://www.intechopen.com/books/anopheles-mosquitoes-new-insights-into-malaria-vectors/thermal-stress-and-thermoregulation-during-feeding-in-mosquitoes
Article
Full-text available
Using triatomine bugs (Hemiptera: Reduvidae) red-eyed mutants, we tested the hypothesis of an alternative function of insect screening pigments against oxidative stress. To tests our hypothesis, we studied the morphological and physiological changes associated with the mutation. We found that wild-type eyes possess great amount of brown and red scr...
Article
Full-text available
It has been largely accepted that the cognitive abilities of disease vector insects may have drastic consequences on parasite transmission. However, despite the research effort that has been invested in the study of learning and memory in haematophagous insects, hitherto few conclusive results have been obtained. Adapting procedures largely validat...
Article
Full-text available
The ability of the insect cercal system to detect approaching predators has been studied extensively in the laboratory and in the field. Some previous studies have assessed the extent to which sensory noise affects the operational characteristics of the cercal system, but these studies have only been carried out in laboratory settings using white n...
Article
It has been largely assumed that the individual experience of disease vector insects may affect host choice and, as a consequence, have an important influence on parasite transmission. In particular, it is speculated that vector insects should be able to learn and remember the most and/or less defensive hosts, shifting their preference accordingly....
Article
Full-text available
It has been largely assumed that the individual experience of insects that are disease vectors might not only contribute to animal fitness, but also have an important influence on parasite transmission. Nevertheless, despite the invested efforts in testing the capacity to learn and remember information in blood-sucking insects, only little conclusi...