Claudio Bozzuto

Claudio Bozzuto
Wildlife Analysis GmbH, Zurich

Wildlife Analysis GmbH (Managing Director)

About

49
Publications
11,869
Reads
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214
Citations
Introduction
Claudio Bozzuto is the founder of Wildlife Analysis GmbH in Zurich (Switzerland), offering mathematical and statistical modeling to aid wildlife management and conservation biology projects (research and applications).

Publications

Publications (49)
Article
1.When prevention of invasive species’ introductions fails, society faces the challenge to manage these invasive species in an effective and efficient way. The success of this depends on biological aspects and on cooperation between decision makers and scientists. Using the case of the round goby Neogobius melanostomus, one of Europe's worst invasi...
Article
Full-text available
1. Conservation science can be most effective in its decision-support role when seeking answers to clearly formulated questions of direct management relevance. Emerging wildlife diseases, a driver of global biodiversity loss, illustrate the challenges of performing this role: in spite of considerable research, successful disease mitigation is uncom...
Article
Full-text available
Many studies document negative inbreeding effects on individuals, and conservation efforts to preserve rare species routinely employ strategies to reduce inbreeding. Despite this, there are few clear examples in nature of inbreeding decreasing the growth rates of populations, and the extent of population-level effects of inbreeding in the wild rema...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Wild boars easily adapt to highly diverse habitats. As a consequence, these animals currently represent the most widespread ungulate species worldwide, with many publications attesting to the impressive growth in numbers and spatial spread over the last few decades. Most wild boar populations are being managed by harvesting, not least to reduce the...
Article
Full-text available
The basic reproduction number, R0, determines the rate of spread of a communicable disease and therefore gives fundamental information needed to plan public health interventions. Using mortality records, we estimated the rate of spread of COVID-19 among 160 counties and county-aggregates in the USA at the start of the epidemic. We show that most of...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Over the last two decades, many studies have emphasized the value of natural history collections (NHCs) for ecological and evolutionary research. Furthermore, with the current biodiversity crisis worsening by the day, these specimens offer invaluable insights into past changes, directly helping researchers to understand the current status and to pr...
Article
Full-text available
One way to reduce the impacts of invading wildlife diseases is setting up fences that would reduce the spread of pathogens by limiting connectivity, similarly to exclusion fences that are commonly used to conserve threatened species against invasive predators. One of the problems with fences is that, while they may have the short-term benefit of im...
Preprint
Full-text available
While discussion of vaccine allocation has centered around who should be prioritized (e.g., health care personnel and the elderly), we argue that vaccines should also be allocated to jurisdictions (e.g., counties within the USA) with the greatest immunization thresholds needed for ending the epidemic. At the current rate of vaccine distribution (Ma...
Article
Full-text available
A Correction to this paper has been published: https://doi.org/10.1038/s42003-021-01679-0.
Technical Report
Full-text available
1. Recent studies have unveiled drastic declines in the diversity and numbers of insects worldwide, unfolding over the last decades. These results have brought insects to the forefront of conservation attention, ranging from mitigation actions planned by dedicated conservation agencies to efforts undertaken by the general public. Further, the conse...
Article
Full-text available
Emerging wildlife diseases are taking a heavy toll on animal and plant species worldwide. Mitigation, particularly in the initial epidemic phase, is hindered by uncertainty about the epidemiology and management of emerging diseases, but also by vague or poorly defined objectives. Here, we use a quantitative analysis to assess how the decision conte...
Technical Report
Full-text available
1. Demographic changes can decrease the intrinsic population growth rate of species. Detecting these changes from ecological time series, however, is particularly challenging for small and declining populations, precisely the type of population that might urgently need targeted management responses. 2. Here, we present a statistical method to detec...
Preprint
Full-text available
The basic reproduction number, R0, determines the rate of spread of a communicable disease and therefore gives fundamental information needed to plan public health interventions. Using mortality records, we estimated the rate of spread of COVID-19 among 160 counties and county- aggregates in the USA. Here, we show that most of the high among-county...
Preprint
Full-text available
We estimated the initial rate of spread (r0) and basic reproduction number (R0) for States in the USA experiencing COVID-19 epidemics by analyzing death data time series using a time-varying autoregressive state-space model. The initial spread varied greatly among States, with the highest r0 = 0.31 [0.23, 0.39] (95% CI) in New York State, correspon...
Preprint
Full-text available
Emerging wildlife diseases are taking a heavy toll on animal and plant species worldwide. Mitigation, particularly in the initial epidemic phase, is hindered by uncertainty about the epidemiology and management of emerging diseases, but also by vague or poorly defined objectives. Here, we use a quantitative analysis to assess how the decision conte...
Data
The Supplementary Information file contains: Supplementary Figs. 1-4, Supplementary Tables 1-9, Supplementary Methods.
Preprint
Full-text available
When managers seek to minimize the impacts of invading wildlife diseases, the use of fences is sometimes suggested. The idea is to reduce the spread of pathogens by limiting connectivity, similarly to the exclusion fences commonly used to conserve threatened species against invasive predators. The long-term ecological costs of fragmentation may be...
Preprint
Full-text available
The current version (Technical report, October 2020) can be found here: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/344887241
Data
This file contains additional methods information and figures for the article "Quantifying the burden of managing wildlife diseases in multiple host species" by Canessa S, Bozzuto C, Pasmans F and Martel A, in Conservation Biology (2019): additional information and methods for next‐generation matrix and community R0, reservoir host species, paramet...
Article
Full-text available
Mitigation of infectious wildlife diseases is especially challenging where pathogens affect communities of multiple host species. Although most ecological studies recognize the challenge posed by multiple‐species pathogens, the implications for management are typically assessed only qualitatively. Translating the intuitive understanding that multip...
Data
Online Appendix to Bozzuto C & Canessa S: Impact of seasonal cycles on host-pathogen dynamics and disease mitigation for Batrachochytrium salamandrivorans. Global Ecology and Conservation 2019. The file contains additional methods information and additional figures.
Article
Full-text available
Seasonal cycles have a demonstrated effect on the dynamics of human and animal diseases. However, their quantitative implications for disease mitigation in wildlife are less well studied. We quantitatively investigate the effect of seasonality on chytridiomycosis caused by Batrachochytrium salamandrivorans in European fire salamanders (Salamandra s...
Preprint
Full-text available
The current version (Technical report) can be found here: www.researchgate.net/publication/335985917
Preprint
Full-text available
Seasonal cycles have a demonstrated effect on the dynamics of human and animal diseases. However, their quantitative implications for disease mitigation in wildlife are less well studied. We investigate quantitatively the effect of seasonality on chytridiomycosis caused by Batrachochytrium salamandrivorans in European fire salamanders (Salamandra s...
Preprint
Full-text available
Mitigation of infectious wildlife diseases is especially challenging where pathogens affect communities of multiple host species. Using a multiple-host compartmental model, we illustrate how to determine analytically whether and how intensively secondary hosts should be managed to prevent outbreaks in focal hosts, using the basic reproduction numbe...
Data
Appendix S1 of article Canessa et al. (2018): Decision making for mitigating wildlife diseases: from theory to practice for an emerging fungal pathogen of amphibians. Journal of Applied Ecology doi:10.1111/1365-2664.13089.
Presentation
Populations of weasels (Mustela nivalis) and stoats (Mustela erminea) have declined in large parts of Switzerland. Habitat destruction and fragmentation due to an increase of the human population and its demand for infrastructure is thought to be cause for the decline. The decline is exarcebated by the concurrent intensification in agriculture and...
Article
Full-text available
Emerging infectious diseases cause extirpation of wildlife populations. We use an epidemiological model to explore the effects of a recently emerged disease caused by the salamander-killing chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium salamandrivorans (Bsal) on host populations, and to evaluate which mitigation measures are most likely to succeed. As individual...
Data
The ESM contains a description of the model that we used for human-mediated dispersal and supplementary figures which show the results of the sensitivity analysis.
Article
Full-text available
Taxonomic resolution or uncertainty poses an important problem in biodiversity research. Assessment of biodiversity at the species level is most informative and preferred, but requires effort and expertise. Alternatively, researchers often bin species into higher taxa because they are unable to recognize them, or to save money and time. Here we ana...
Article
One of the main recommendations of reintroduction biology for prospective projects is that they should be planned with local species knowledge and with species-specific quantitative modelling, for example, from population viability analysis (PVA). Here, we apply this approach to the planned reintroduction of the critically endangered Floreana mocki...
Article
in lieu of an abstract: https://www.jstor.org/stable/41124030
Article
Für weitere Details: https://www.jstor.org/stable/41124030

Questions

Question (1)
Question
Dear colleagues,
The raging war in Ukraine is an inconceivable nightmare for the Ukrainian people and the world. Without any intent to lessen the atrocities against human lives, an additional (maybe less visible) unfolding catastrophe is the war’s detrimental effects on the environment.
«[…] ‘ecocide’ means unlawful or wanton acts committed with knowledge that there is a substantial likelihood of severe and either widespread or long-term damage to the environment being caused by those acts.» (https://www.ecocidelawalliance.org/definition/)
As an ecologist myself, I’m convinced we should protect our environment on its own right. Nonetheless, given the essential ecosystem services on which humans depend on, an impacted environment in-/directly impacts human health. It’ll take huge amounts of resources (incl. money and time) to partly restore impacted areas. Meanwhile, Ukrainians and their unique nature will be suffering the consequences.
How can we help mitigate the unfolding ecocidal acts? What Ukrainian or international organizations should we support for protective actions in Ukraine?
May I kindly ask you:
  • to provide replies directly relevant to the topic
  • not to engage with the usual trolls disrupting Ukraine-related discussions
UPDATE: here’s a small selection of articles on the discussion’s topic (see also the first reply below):
Looking forward to your thoughts!
Claudio

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (3)
Project
Emerging wildlife diseases constitute a major cause of global biodiversity decline. Unfortunately, mitigation successes continue being exceptionally rare, especially during the epidemic phase. With this project we broaden the view of current management approaches and attitudes by embedding them into a decision-making context. To do justice to the complexities of epizootics, wildlife disease management should unite and seize the knowledge of a diverse set of specialists, ranging from theoretical biologist to veterinarians, from field-based ecologists to decision analysts, from conservation authorities to other stakeholders outside academia. We hope that through this broadened view wildlife disease management will profit from clearly defining objectives and strategies, and embracing inherent limitations. The ultimate aim is to produce practicable and versatile knowledge, to aid affected wildlife when needed, where possible, and justified.