Claudine Hauri

Claudine Hauri
University of Alaska Fairbanks · International Arctic Research Center

PhD

About

37
Publications
10,842
Reads
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1,731
Citations
Citations since 2017
13 Research Items
1137 Citations
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Introduction
My research focuses on coastal inorganic carbon and nutrient dynamics in high-latitude regions. I'm using a combination of observations and biogeochemical models to investigate the physical, chemical, and biological processes that control the natural and anthropogenic variability in the ocean's carbon system. In collaboration with marine ecologists, I am working on linking knowledge of field and model oceanographic studies with experimental biological studies that help improve our understanding of biological responses of marine organisms to ocean acidification and global change. I'm also currently developing a Carbon Seaglider in collaboration with Kongsberg and the Alutiiq Pride Shellfish Hatchery.
Additional affiliations
June 2012 - September 2014
University of Alaska Fairbanks
Position
  • PostDoc Position
May 2008 - February 2012
ETH Zurich
Position
  • PhD Student
August 2006 - August 2007
Australian Institute of Marine Science
Position
  • Visiting Graduate Student

Publications

Publications (37)
Preprint
Full-text available
Recent marine heatwaves in the Gulf of Alaska have had devastating and lasting impacts on species from various trophic levels. As a result of climate change, total heat exposure in the upper ocean has become longer, more intense, more frequent, and more likely to happen at the same time as other environmental extremes. The combination of multiple e...
Preprint
Full-text available
Healthy Arctic marine ecosystems are essential to the food security and sovereignty, culture and wellbeing of Indigenous Peoples in the Arctic. At the same time, Arctic marine ecosystems are highly susceptible to impacts of climate change and ocean acidification. While increasing ocean and air temperatures and melting sea ice act as direct stressor...
Article
Full-text available
Approximately one-quarter of the CO2 emitted to the atmosphere annually from human activities is absorbed by the ocean, resulting in a reduction of seawater pH and shifts in seawater carbonate chemistry. This multi-decadal process, termed “anthropogenic ocean acidification” (OA), has been shown to have detrimental impacts on marine ecosystems. Rece...
Article
Full-text available
Uptake of anthropogenic carbon dioxide from the atmosphere by the surface ocean is leading to global ocean acidification, but regional variations in ocean circulation and mixing can dampen or accelerate apparent acidification rates. Here we use a regional ocean model simulation for the years 1980 to 2013 and observational data to investigate how oc...
Article
Full-text available
Exposure to the impact of ocean acidification (OA) is increasing in high-latitudinal productive habitats. Pelagic calcifying snails (pteropods), a significant component of the diet of economically important fish, are found in high abundance in these regions. Pteropods have thin shells that readily dissolve at low aragonite saturation state (Ω ar ),...
Article
Full-text available
The coastal ecosystem of the Gulf of Alaska (GOA) is especially vulnerable to the effects of ocean acidification and climate change. Detection of these long-term trends requires a good understanding of the system’s natural state. The GOA is a highly dynamic system that exhibits large inorganic carbon variability on subseasonal to interannual timesc...
Preprint
Full-text available
Abstract. The coastal ecosystem of the Gulf of Alaska (GOA) is especially vulnerable to the effects of ocean acidification and climate change that can only be understood within the context of the natural variability of physical and chemical conditions. Controlled by its complex bathymetry, iron enriched freshwater discharge, and wind and solar radi...
Article
Full-text available
Models project that with current CO2 emission rates, the Southern Ocean surface will be undersaturated with respect to aragonite by the end of this century1–4. This will result in widespread impacts on biogeochemistry and ocean ecosystems5–7, particularly the health of aragonitic organisms, such as pteropods⁷, which can dominate polar surface water...
Article
Full-text available
Although Arctic marine ecosystems are changing rapidly, year-round monitoring is currently very limited and presents multiple challenges unique to this region. The Chukchi Ecosystem Observatory (CEO) described here uses new sensor technologies to meet needs for continuous, high-resolution, and year-round observations across all levels of the ecosys...
Article
Full-text available
Although Arctic marine ecosystems are changing rapidly, year-round monitoring is currently very limited and presents multiple challenges unique to this region. The Chukchi Ecosystem Observatory (CEO) described here uses new sensor technologies to meet needs for continuous, high resolution, and year-round observations across all levels of the ecosys...
Conference Paper
In 2015, the Hanna Shoal region of the Chukchi Sea shallower than the 40 m isobath was withdrawn from outer continental shelf oil and gas exploration, a move the White House noted was designed to protect areas of "critical importance … for marine mammals, other wildlife, and wildlife habitat". Arctic regions are projected to strongly manifest impac...
Article
Ocean acidification may lead to seasonal aragonite undersaturation in surface waters of the Southern Ocean as early as 2030 (ref.). These conditions are harmful to key organisms such as pteropods, which contribute significantly to the pelagic foodweb and carbon export fluxes in this region. Although the severity of ocean acidification impacts is ma...
Article
Full-text available
We present 20 years of seawater inorganic carbon measurements collected along the western shelf and slope of the Antarctic Peninsula. Water column observations from summertime cruises and seasonal surface underway pCO2 measurements provide unique insights into the spatial, seasonal, and interannual variability in this dynamic system. Discrete measu...
Article
Full-text available
Over the past decade, ocean acidification (OA) has emerged as a major concern in ocean science. The field of OA is based on certainties—uptake of carbon dioxide into the global ocean alters its carbon chemistry, and many marine organisms, especially calcifiers, are sensitive to this change. However, the field must accommodate uncertainties about th...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding the temporal dynamics of present thermal and pH exposure on coral reefs is crucial for elucidating reef response to future global change. Diel ranges in temperature and carbonate chemistry parameters coupled with seasonal changes in the mean conditions define periods during the year when a reef habitat is exposed to anomalous thermal...
Article
Full-text available
We present 20 years of seawater inorganic carbon measurements collected along the western shelf and slope of the Antarctic Peninsula. Water column observations from summertime cruises and seasonal surface underway pCO2 measurements provide unique insights into the spatial, seasonal, and interannual variability in this dynamic system. Discrete measu...
Article
Understanding the fate and influence of glacial meltwater in heavily ice-covered fjord systems has proven difficult because previous measurement platforms were con­strained to deeper water to keep instrumentation safe from drifting icebergs. Now, using novel, satellite-tracked devices that can with­ stand multiple collisions with ice blocks (see Fi...
Article
Full-text available
The highly productive fisheries of Alaska are located in seas projected to experience strong global change, including rapid transitions in temperature and ocean acidification-driven changes in pH and other chemical parameters. Many of the marine organisms that are most intensely affected by ocean acidification (OA) contribute substantially to the s...
Article
[1] The Chukchi Sea is thought to be a globally important sink of atmospheric CO2 due to the summertime drawdown of surface pCO2 by phytoplankton and subsequent shelf-to-basin transport of CO2-enriched subsurface waters into the upper halocline of the Arctic Ocean. Here we show that annually occurring storm-induced mixing events during autumn month...
Article
The State of the Climate in 2012 is a supplement to the August 2013 issue of the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society (BAMS Vol. 94, No. 8). The full report is available from the publisher, The Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society.
Article
Full-text available
For the first time in serveral years, the El Nino-Southern Oscillation did not dominate regional climate conditions around the globe. A weak La Ni a dissipated to ENSOneutral conditions by spring, and while El Nino appeared to be emerging during summer, this phase never fully developed as sea surface temperatures in the eastern conditions. Neverthe...
Article
Ocean acidification will progress in an episodic manner, yet this has rarely been considered. Here, we investigate how the intensity, duration, and severity of episodic low aragonite saturation state events along the California continental shelf have changed since ~1750, and how they might change up to 2050 under the A2 scenario from the Special Re...
Article
Full-text available
Due to seasonal upwelling, the upper ocean waters of the California Current System (CCS) have a naturally low pH and aragonite saturation state (Ωarag), making this region particularly prone to the effects of ocean acidification. Here, we use the Regional Oceanic Modeling System (ROMS) to conduct preindustrial and transient (1995–2050) simulations...
Article
Full-text available
Due to seasonal upwelling, the upper ocean waters of the California Current System (CCS) have a naturally low pH and aragonite saturation state (Ω<sub>arag</sub>), making this region particularly prone to the effects of ocean acidification. Here, we use the Regional Oceanic Modeling System (ROMS) to conduct preindustrial and transient (1995–2050) s...
Article
Full-text available
Using results from four coupled global carbon cycle-climate models combined with in situ observations, we estimate the effects of future global warming and ocean acidification on potential habitats for tropical/subtropical and temperate coral communities in the seas around Japan. The suitability of coral habitats is classified on the basis of the c...
Article
Full-text available
Nearshore waters of the California Current System (California CS) already have a low carbonate saturation state, making them particularly susceptible to ocean acidification. We used eddy-resolving model simulations to study the potential development of ocean acidification in this system up to the year 2050 under the Special Report on Emissions Scen...
Article
Full-text available
Using results from four coupled global carbon cycle-climate models combined with in situ observations, we estimate the combined effects of future global warming and ocean acidification on potential habitats for tropical/subtropical and temperate coral communities in the seas around Japan. The suitability of the coral habitats are identified primari...
Article
Full-text available
Disturbed coral reefs are often dominated by dense mat- or canopy-forming assemblages of macroalgae. This study investigated how such dense macroalgal assemblages change the chemical and physical microenvironment for understorey corals, and how the altered environmental conditions affect the physiological performance of corals. Field measurements w...
Article
Full-text available
Eastern boundary upwelling systems (EBUS) are naturally more acidic than most of the rest of the surface ocean. Observations of EBUS already show pH values and saturation states with regard to the carbonate mineral aragonite that are as low as those expected for most open ocean waters several decades from now. Thus, as atmospheric CO2 increases fur...
Article
Full-text available
Eastern Boundary Current Upwelling Systems (EBUS) are major oceanographic ecosystems that are well known for high productivity and for playing an important role in the marine carbon cycle. EBUS are particularly sensitive to human-induced climate change, such as potential shifts in the distribution and the magnitude of upwelling-favorable winds, as...
Article
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This article was submitted without an abstract, please refer to the full-text PDF file.

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