Claudia Núñez-Pacheco

Claudia Núñez-Pacheco
KTH Royal Institute of Technology | KTH · Department of Media Technology and Interaction Design (MID)

PhD (IxD HCI) MIDEA BDes
Postdoctoral Researcher, MID KTH Digital Futures

About

34
Publications
8,556
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144
Citations
Introduction
Claudia Núñez-Pacheco is a design researcher and artist. Her research investigates how bodily ways of knowing can be used as crafting materials for design ideation, evaluation, insight and empathy. In her research journey, Claudia has engaged in a multidisciplinary exploration that merges human-computer interaction (HCI) and design methods with tools from experiential psychology, including the Focusing Technique.
Additional affiliations
October 2020 - present
KTH Royal Institute of Technology
Position
  • PostDoc Position
January 2018 - April 2020
Universidad Austral de Chile
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
March 2014 - December 2017
The University of Sydney
Position
  • Lecturer

Publications

Publications (34)
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Wearable technology brings computation in intimate proximity to the body, raising questions about the role of the body in interacting with tools. The disappearance of self and technology in achieving transparent and skilful action – the ideal aspiration of ubiquitous and context-aware computing – overlooks the potential of self-awareness as a criti...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Although not always consciously collected, bodily information shapes the way we construct meaning. By paying attention towards the subtle changes of the soma, it is possible to access part of the ongoing source of meaning and self-knowledge contained in the inner self. In this paper, we describe how the use of wearable devices to amplify direct per...
Article
Aesthetic experiences embody a sense of unity that makes their particular qualities memorable to our existence. The richness of meaning encapsulated by routine acts on the other hand, is mostly taken for granted. We introduce the somatic Focusing technique to access the tacit dimension of people’s personal stories, offering a new perspective on exp...
Article
The idea of connecting with the sensory realities of others can help us to build empathic ties and to think outside the boundaries of our preconceived ideas. Envisioning these opportunities, this paper introduces a framework with a set of embodied modalities derived from communicating embodied experiences through a prototype for storytelling called...
Article
Full-text available
Although our embodied dimension has been recognised as a generative source of imagination through movement and gesture, the notion of the body as a generator of more symbolic and descriptive expressions of knowledge remains mostly unexplored in human-computer interaction (HCI). This theoretical paper introduces the sensitising concept of reflection...
Article
Full-text available
Atendiendo a la necesidad de integrar las sensibilidades somáticas a la enseñanza del diseño, este artículo ofrece un recorrido por una actividad realizada en un taller cuyo propósito fue introducir las leyes de la Gestalt a través de cultivar la sensibilidad somática. En lugar de seguir una ruta exclusivamente visual para aprender las leyes de la...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Attending to the challenges of describing first-person experience, this article illustrates different uses of the Focusing method in interaction design and HCI, offering a systematic way of accessing the subtle qualities of lived experiences for design use. In this approach, the implicit bodily knowledge -or felt sense- becomes the material capture...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Through this pictorial, I propose a generative method for the elicitation of autoethnographic themes for design research. This dialogue with tangible traces uses photography in conversation with tangible body maps (TBMs) towards harvesting evocative content for exploration. This dialogical tool functions as a way of generating conceptual knowledge...
Article
Full-text available
Attending to the need to integrate somatic sensibilities into design education, this paper provides a walkthrough of a workshop activity devoted to introducing Gestalt laws through the cultivation of somatic sensibility. Instead of following a solely visually-oriented path to learning Gestalt laws, students were asked to use their senses and materi...
Article
Full-text available
Kristina Höök es profesora de Diseño de Interacción en el Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), donde dirige el Grupo de Investigación de Diseño Somaestético, un laboratorio que explora diversas formas de reincorporar el cuerpo y el movi­miento a un régimen de diseño que durante mucho tiempo ha privilegiado el lenguaje y la lógica. La investigación...
Article
Full-text available
Cultivar la sensibilidad somática implica aumentar nuestra apre­ciación sensorial como vía para idear experiencias multisensoriales significativas en el diseño de interacción. Inmersos en un mundo cada vez más digitalizado y centrado en los datos, los proyectos de investigación centrados en la realidad sensorial, corporizada y material de nuestra e...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Deep breathing exercises are known to help decrease stress. Wearable and ambient computing can help initiate and support deep breathing exercises. Most studies have focused on a single sensory modality for providing feedback on the quality of breathing and other physiological data. Objective: Our research compares different feedback...
Article
This position statement describes the transformation of an interactive installation from an instrumental piece of art and science pedagogy into a meaningful performative piece, which forced its creators to adopt a political stance in the light of a period of social unrest taking place in Chile beginning in October 2019. It describes how an apparent...
Book
This design methodology book provides over 80 different methods of design and is the perfect resource for design educators, students, and practitioners. Think of this resource as a sort of ‘refer to’ handbook when you’re stuck or need some inspiration for your latest design project or lesson. It considers the world outside of design where products...
Conference Paper
There is a growing interest amongst the HCI community to access and articulate the core of experiences for design use. The premise is that, by accessing detailed accounts of everyday experiences, we can obtain refined material for the design of interactive systems more connected with our bodies and emotions. This TEI studio aims to introduce partic...
Book
Full-text available
Wearable technologies for self-knowledge and self-improvement are predominantly data-driven, whereas tools for somatic self-reflection based in sensory stimuli are less explored. Our research investigates the question of how do we facilitate access to aesthetic experiences for bodily awareness using heat and vibration as art and design materials? T...
Article
The article discusses the making of O que vos nunca cuidei a dizer, a gallery work for interactive garment, transducer-based interface and live electronics. A technical description of the work is framed by an account of the creative process with reference to media archaeological methodology and by a discussion of the role of composed instruments in...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Pulsante (translates as Pulsating) is a new-media device representing a large-scale model of a human heart. It captures the essential elements of the organ in order to highlight a clear visualisation of the circulatory system. The aims of this transdisciplinary work are twofold: (1) To allow the audience to connect with themselves and others, foste...
Article
Full-text available
Although almost two decades have passed since the term aesthetics of interaction made the appearance in design-oriented Human-computer Interaction (HCI), the actual understanding of the concept remains fuzzy and focused on the description of qualities of what constitutes an aesthetic experience. However, by trying to describe specific aesthetic qua...
Poster
Full-text available
Context-aware technologies increasingly become more integrated into people’s everyday lives, providing adaptive services in seamless ways that make many everyday tasks and activities more practical and automated. However, this seamless automation of services may prevent people from reflecting on the opportunities offered by their surroundings. The...
Article
The recent turn in the field of human–computer interaction to design and the aesthetics of interaction has generated a renewed focus on the body as the fundamental site of experience. Interaction design researchers and educators are exploring how to design for the felt dimension of interactions with computing technologies, anchored in the sensing a...
Book
This handbook documents sixty methods used in design innovation projects leading to the design of new products or services. It is the first publication to bring together methods, tools and case studies that involve multiple design disciplines and perspectives – from product and service design to interaction and user experience design. Design. Thin...
Thesis
Third Wave Human Computer Interaction (HCI) has opened the door for research agendas placing the lived body in the centre of discussion. However, aspects such as the articulation of aesthetic experiences, as well as the transference of somatic values into the design practice require more systematic methods to analyse, articulate and frame those val...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Meditation is an ancient Eastern practice, which is receiving renewed popularity as a secular approach to health and well-being. Recent advances in commercial EEG sensor technology provide opportunities for visualising biological brainwave data by artists and designers, outside the fields of neuroscience and psychiatry. We chart the creative develo...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Our bodily dimension plays a fundamental role in the ongoing construction of meaning. Exploring the potential of this perspective, this paper describes the structure of a one-day workshop entitled: The body as a source of aesthetic qualities for design: Explorations and techniques. In this workshop, participants will engage with a series of somatic...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
As technology becomes embedded in our everyday life, the development of methods for accessing experience has become an important theme in the field of human-computer interaction and design. Currently most user evaluation techniques are still concerned with conscious assessment of devices and systems, ignoring that our bodily senses are constantly c...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The body contains the particular condition of being simultaneously subject and object. In this regard, this position paper advocates for the importance of developing technologies that celebrate the subjective aspects of the body. As a theoretical ground, I find inspiration from Shusterman's concept of soma and his philosophical project of Somaesthe...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
This paper offers the beginnings of a methodological framework for the design of body-centric artifacts, understood as those that use embodied self-awareness as a tool for bodily self-knowledge and wellbeing. We present a case study on the design of artifacts to be applied in the self-practice of the psychotherapeutic technique Focusing. The autobi...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The body contains the particular condition of being simultaneously subject and object. In this regard, this position paper advocates for the importance of developing technologies that celebrate the subjective aspects of the body. As a theoretical ground, I find inspiration from Shusterman’s concept of soma and his philosophical project of Somaesthe...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The use of biofeedback data is becoming increasingly popular in interactive art and design, acting as a mirror of the self. It opens up interesting avenues for facilitating technology-mediated self-reflection on the body. However it also poses challenges for interaction design, given the semi-involuntary nature of control we have over our physiolog...

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Projects

Projects (5)
Project
Guest editors Claudia Núñez-Pacheco | KTH Royal Institute of Technology | claudia2@kth.se Marianela Ciolfi Felice | KTH Royal Institute of Technology | ciolfi@kth.se Vasiliki Tsaknaki | IT University of Copenhagen | vats@itu.dk ————————– Submission deadline: May 2, 2021 ————————– In his Phenomenology of Perception, Merleau-Ponty (1962) made a radical claim, stating that we are our bodies and that subjective experiences cannot be separated from our objective reality. Our somatic sensibilities − shaped by subjective experience − make us who we are. Additionally, Gendlin (1980) claimed that our imagination is bodily and that our bodies are interactional, influencing how we relate in a world of possibilities. For this special issue of Diseña, we acknowledge that subjective somatic differences are pivotal in the process of meaning-making, therefore, shaping the design process and outcomes (Loke & Schiphorst, 2018). Although in the last decade we have seen a growing interest in the fields of Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) and Interaction Design to examine the lived body and felt somatic experiences as the starting point for the design of interactive systems, this experiential perspective still remains relatively underrepresented (Höök, 2018). With the rise of COVID 19, our bodies have stayed enclosed in their private spaces, affecting every dimension of our lives in ways we were not able to predict before. As academics, we have also witnessed how it has impacted design research and pedagogy, sacrificing an essential part of the experiential − therefore embodied − dimension of design making. Immersed in an increasingly digitalized and data-centric world, research projects centering on the sensory, embodied, and material reality of our experience might start losing momentum. However, we also believe these difficulties could open up the door for new opportunities to make more prevalent the importance of embodied and somatic practices in design and HCI. Methods based on somatic knowledge have mostly been developed outside the academic domain, ranging from dance, performance, role-playing, and other various body-based practices (Loke & Schiphorst, 2018). These have influenced the emergence of a myriad of methods, such as bodystorming (Schleicher et al., 2010), experience prototyping (Buchenau & Suri, 2000), embodied sketches (Márquez Segura et al., 2016), moving and making strange (Loke & Robertson, 2013), focusing applied to design (Núñez-Pacheco & Loke, 2018), and so on. Influenced by somatics, somaesthetics, and aesthetic pragmatism, the Somaesthetic Design Project at the Royal Institute of Technology in Sweden KTH (Höök et al., 2015) has brought a series of design projects that acknowledge the importance of the lived body, ranging from women’s health (Balaam et al., 2020; Campo Woytuk et al., 2020), ideation artifacts or Soma Bits (Windlin et al., 2019), a somatic approach to data (Alfaras et al., 2020; Tsaknaki et al., 2020) and problematizing on the politics of designing with the soma (Höök et al., 2019). The recognition of methods and perspectives centering on the body and somatic knowledge have the following advantages: (1) the systematic use of embodied attention and the articulation of experiential qualities can help designers to envision more meaningful interactive experiences, promoting empathy towards others (Höök, 2018). (2) Somatic-oriented practices can also help interaction designers towards a more detailed and committed transmission of knowledge for design (Schiphorst, 2011). In this respect, designers would be trained not only to craft objects but also to recognize the nuances of human embodied experience they are designing for (Schiphorst, 2011). (3) Finally, a focus on other senses beyond the visual, which has been predominant in the discipline of interaction design, can scaffold the emergence of discoveries and insights and might even enable the design of more complex, accessible, and multifaceted experiences involving the whole body and emotions (Lupton & Lipps, 2018). This special issue, titled Design and Somatic Sensibilities, aims to gather articles from a broad perspective highlighting the role of the body in HCI and Interaction Design, addressing issues such as (but not limited to): ● Soma design: Explorations, methods, techniques, and theoretical contributions. ● First-person perspectives in design and the role of somatic engagements in the generation of knowledge. ● Design and feminism: Feminist epistemologies and design approaches that highlight an expanded understanding of the notion of the body. ● Underrepresented somatic sensibilities, intimacies, and embodiments in design. ● Design for movement and interaction with a focus on somatic and felt experience ● Speculative design and sentient human bodies. ● Transferability of somatic experience, from subjective to collective. ● Biodata explored and materialized as experiential, sensory information. REFERENCES ALFARAS, M., TSAKNAKI, V., SANCHES, P., WINDLIN, C., UMAIR, M., SAS, C., & HÖÖK, K. (2020). From Biodata to Somadata. Proceedings of the 2020 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems. Association for Computing Machinery, Article 555. https://doi.org/10.1145/3313831.3376684 BALAAM, M., WOYTUK, N. C., FELICE, M. C., AFSAR, O. K., STÅHL, A., & SØNDERGAARD, M. L. J. (2020). Intimate Touch. Interactions, 27(6), 14–17. https://doi.org/10.1145/3427781 BUCHENAU, M., & SURI, J. F. (2000). Experience prototyping. Proceedings of the 3rd Conference on Designing Interactive Systems: Processes, Practices, Methods, and Techniques. Association for Computing Machinery, 424–433. https://doi.org/10.1145/347642.347802 CAMPO WOYTUK, N., SØNDERGAARD, M. L. J., CIOLFI FELICE, M., & BALAAM, M. (2020). Touching and Being in Touch with the Menstruating Body. Proceedings of the 2020 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems. Association for Computing Machinery, Article 344. https://doi.org/10.1145/3313831.3376471 GENDLIN, E. T. (1980). Imagery is More Powerful with Focusing: Theory and Practice. In J. E. Shorr, G. E. Sobel, P. Robin, & J. A. Connella (Eds.), Imagery: Its Many Dimensions and Applications (pp. 65–73). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4684-3731-7_5 HÖÖK, K. (2018). Designing with the Body: Somaesthetic Interaction Design. The MIT Press. HÖÖK, K., ERIKSSON, S., LOUISE JUUL SØNDERGAARD, M., CIOLFI FELICE, M., CAMPO WOYTUK, N., KILIC AFSAR, O., TSAKNAKI, V., & STÅHL, A. (2019). Soma Design and Politics of the Body. Proceedings of the Halfway to the Future Symposium 2019. Association for Computing Machinery, Article 1. https://doi.org/10.1145/3363384.3363385 HÖÖK, K., STÅHL, A., JONSSON, M., MERCURIO, J., KARLSSON, A., & JOHNSON, E.-C. B. (2015). Somaesthetic Design. Interactions, 22(4), 26–33. https://doi.org/10.1145/2770888 LOKE, L., & ROBERTSON, T. (2013). Moving and Making Strange: An Embodied Approach to Movement-Based Interaction Design. ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction, 20(1), Article 7. https://doi.org/10.1145/2442106.2442113 LOKE, L., & SCHIPHORST, T. (2018). The Somatic Turn in Human-Computer Interaction. Interactions, 25(5), 54–5863. https://doi.org/10.1145/3236675 LUPTON, E., & LIPPS, A. (Eds.). (2018). The Senses: Design Beyond Vision. Chronicle Books. MÁRQUEZ SEGURA, E., TURMO VIDAL, L., ROSTAMI, A., & WAERN, A. (2016). Embodied Sketching. Proceedings of the 2016 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems. Association for Computing Machinery, 6014–6027. https://doi.org/10.1145/2858036.2858486 MERLEAU-PONTY, M. (1962). Phenomenology of Perception (C. Smith, Trans.). Routledge; Kegan Paul. NÚÑEZ-PACHECO, C., & LOKE, L. (2018). Towards a Technique for Articulating Aesthetic Experiences in Design using Focusing and the Felt Sense. The Design Journal, 21(4), 583–603. https://doi.org/10.1080/14606925.2018.1467680 SCHIPHORST, T. (2011). Self-evidence: Applying Somatic Connoisseurship to Experience Design. CHI ’11 Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems. Association for Computing Machinery, 145–160. https://doi.org/10.1145/1979742.1979640 SCHLEICHER, D., JONES, P., & KACHUR, O. (2010). Bodystorming as Embodied Designing. Interactions, 17(6), 47–51. https://doi.org/10.1145/1865245.1865256 TSAKNAKI, V., JENKINS, T., BOER, L., HOMEWOOD, S., HOWELL, N., & SANCHES, P. (2020). Challenges and Opportunities for Designing with Biodata as Material. Proceedings of the 11th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction: Shaping Experiences, Shaping Society. Association for Computing Machinery, Article 122. https://doi.org/10.1145/3419249.3420063 WINDLIN, C., STÅHL, A., SANCHES, P., TSAKNA-KI, V., KARPASHEVICH, P., BALAAM, M.-L., & HÖÖK, K. (2019). Soma Bits -Mediating Technology to Orchestrate Bodily Experiences. Proceedings of the 4th Biennial Research through Design Conference 2019. Article 25. https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.7855799.v2 ————————– SUBMISSION GUIDELINES Please submit your manuscript in www.revistadisena.uc.cl by May 2, 2021, for peer-review. Please read the instructions for the authors. The submission includes: – A manuscript of 3,500 – 4,000 words, with references in APA Style. N.B. the text should be anonymized for blind peer-review. Please, upload Word documents (not PDF). – An abstract of 140 words max. – Five keywords – Author biographies of 150 words max. After peer-review, corrections will need to take place in July 2021. The issue will be published in January 2022.————————– ABOUT THE JOURNAL Diseña is a peer-reviewed, biannual, and bilingual publication by the Escuela de Diseño of the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile. Diseña promotes research in all areas of Design. Its specific aim is to promote critical thought about methodologies, methods, practices, and tools of research and project work. www.revistadisena.uc.cl Image source: Soma Bits – https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.7855799.v2