Claire Ashton-James

Claire Ashton-James
The University of Sydney · Kolling Institute of Medical Research

PhD

About

64
Publications
23,012
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
2,184
Citations
Additional affiliations
April 2015 - present
The University of Sydney
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
August 2011 - July 2015
Amsterdam University Medical Center
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
July 2011 - August 2015
Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)

Publications

Publications (64)
Article
Introduction Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (CBT)–based programmes for chronic pain are often conducted in groups, most likely for time and cost efficiencies. However, there has been very little investigation of the role that the group itself, and particularly the processes occurring within the group, may play in individual outcomes. The objective of...
Article
Full-text available
Occupational burnout is a critical issue affecting the welfare of veterinary care providers, their patients, and the sustainability of veterinary healthcare organizations. The current research aimed to evaluate the prevalence of and factors contributing to stress, wellbeing, burnout symptoms and job satisfaction among clinical and non-clinical staf...
Article
Full-text available
Introduction: Opioid medications are no longer recommended as long-term therapy for chronic non-cancer pain, and many patients are advised to reduce or discontinue opioid medications. Many patients report difficulties in tapering opioid medications, necessitating supporting interventions. This protocol describes a pilot randomised controlled trial...
Article
Objective To review interventions to reduce long term opioid treatment in people with chronic non-cancer pain, considering efficacy on dose reduction and discontinuation, pain, function, quality of life, withdrawal symptoms, substance use, and adverse events. Design Systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials and non-random...
Article
Full-text available
Patients with chronic pain experience stigma within the healthcare system. This stigma is compounded for those taking long-term prescription opioids. Often, public messaging and organizational policies have telegraphed that opioid treatment is a problem to be solved by focusing only on medication reduction efforts. Lack of data has contributed to m...
Article
Tapering opioids for chronic pain can be challenging for both patients and prescribers, both of whom may be unsure of what to expect in terms of pain, distress, activity interference, and withdrawal symptoms over the first few weeks and months of the taper. In order to better prepare clinicians to provide patient-centred tapering support, the curre...
Article
We read with great interest Giusti et al.'s systematic review and meta-analysis of psychological and psychosocial predictors of chronic postsurgical pain (CPSP). 1 The prevalence and societal burden of CPSP is escalating. We agree with the authors that identification is the key to managing risk, and this involves understanding not only the biologic...
Article
Full-text available
Introduction: Psychological factors such as fear avoidance beliefs, depression, anxiety, catastrophic thinking and familial and social stress, have been associated with high disability levels in people with chronic low back pain (LBP). Guidelines endorse the integration of psychological interventions in the management of chronic LBP. However, unce...
Article
Frequent exposure to patient distress is associated with higher prevalence of clinician distress and symptoms of burnout. Patients with chronic pain often present with high levels of emotional distress. The current study examined the prevalence of burnout symptoms among a multidisciplinary sample of pain clinicians in Australia, the relationship be...
Article
Background: There are various approaches to the psychological management of chronic pain and it is difficult to know which components of psychological therapies are necessary or desirable for the effective management of chronic pain. Methods: We conducted a Delphi study to develop a consensus on the necessary and desirable psychological interven...
Article
This study explored whether the psychological composition of a group, with respect to mood, catastrophising, fear of movement and pain self-efficacy characteristics at baseline, is associated with individuals’ treatment outcomes following group cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT)-based programmes for chronic pain. Retrospective analyses of outcomes...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Patients' feeling of trust in their surgeon may modulate the experience of pain during surgery. However, factors that contribute to patients' experience of trust during surgery remain underexamined. The current study examined the contribution of patients' impressions of surgeons' warmth and competence to their experience of trust and p...
Article
Full-text available
In addition to improved oral health and function, many people are motivated to undergo orthognathic surgery to improve their facial aesthetics and overall psychological well‐being (daily affect and satisfaction with life). This article explains the phenomenon of hedonic adaptation, which challenges the notion that patients treated with orthognathic...
Article
Clinicians report reluctance to deliver opioid-tapering advice to patients with chronic pain, in part due to concerns that patients will be angry and dissatisfied. An experiment was conducted to examine chronic pain patients' emotional and attitudinal responses to simulated opioid-tapering advice. Patients scheduled for an initial assessment at a t...
Article
Full-text available
Past research indicates that patient perceptions of surgeon warmth and competence influence treatment expectancies and satisfaction with treatment outcomes. Stereotypes have a powerful impact on impression formation. The present research explores stereotypes about surgeon warmth and competence and investigates the extent to which surgeon gender inf...
Data
Supplementary material data file. (XLSX)
Chapter
Other people's words can have a powerful influence on how we interpret our environment, what we expect and experience, what we value, how we feel, what we choose, and how we behave. Placebo (and nocebo) effects are a dramatic example of this. The way in which healthcare professionals discuss, describe, and inform patients about the characteristic e...
Article
This study explored whether group size and group member characteristics (age, gender, compensation status) were associated with patient outcomes (changes in pain and disability). Retrospective analyses of outcome data obtained from two independently run group Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) programs for chronic pain (Program A: N = 317 and Prog...
Article
Full-text available
A variety of treatment outcomes in chronic pain are influenced by patient–clinician rapport. Patients often report finding it difficult to explain their pain, and this potential obstacle to mutual understanding may impede patient–clinician rapport. Previous research has argued that the communication of both patients and clinicians is facilitated by...
Article
Full-text available
Introduction:. Social relationships facilitate coping with pain, but research suggests that it may be difficult to galvanize social support during an episode of acute pain. Objectives:. The current research examined whether social connections are optimized in the anticipation of pain by observing patients' mimicry of an interaction partner prior to...
Article
Objectives: Previous research has demonstrated the efficacy of using local compression to reduce postoperative pain after third molar surgery. It has been theorized that compression reduces pain intensity through vasoconstriction. The current research tests the veracity of this vasoconstriction hypothesis by testing the impact of local epinephrine...
Article
The aim of the present study was to assess the indications, results and complications of patients treated with porous polyethylene (Medpor(®)) implants in the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery of VU Medical Centre, Amsterdam over 17 years. A total of 69 high-density porous polyethylene implants (Medpor(®) Biomaterial; Porex Surgical, New...
Article
Our study investigated the social judgments that are made about people who appear to be in pain. Fifty-six participants viewed two video clips of human figures exercising. The videos were created by a motion tracking system, and showed dots that had been placed at various points on the body, so body motion was the only visible cue. One of the figur...
Article
Because of their shared neurobiological underpinnings, factors increasing physical pain can also increase feelings of social disconnection (“social pain”). Feelings of connection with a social group are reflected in the term social identification, and social identity is commonly associated with intergroup discrimination. In two experiments, we exam...
Article
Full-text available
The evaluation of student work is a central aspect of the teaching profession that can affect students in significant ways. Although teachers use multiple criteria for assessing student work, it is not yet known if emotions are a factor in their grading decisions as has been found in other instances of professional evaluations. Reason to believe th...
Article
Full-text available
A controversial feature of modern parenting is ''child-centrism,'' the tendency for parents to prioritize their children's well-being above their own. It has been suggested that child-centric parenting in its various forms may undermine parental well-being. Con-trary to popular belief, more child-centric parents reported deriving more happiness and...
Article
Full-text available
For patients with surgical third molar removal, it is unknown what constitutes a clinically important change in patients’ visual analogue scale (VAS) reports of pain intensity. OBJECTIVES: To determine what constitutes a clinically important change in pain intensity on a VAS following surgical removal of the third molar. METHODS: The study populati...
Article
Full-text available
Every year, over 260,000 patients in the Netherlands are diagnosed with a traumatic fracture. Many patients are treated surgically and need postoperative treatment of pain. Research suggests postoperative pain is often under-treated, leaving a significant proportion of patients in moderate to severe postoperative pain. Specialized, evidence-based p...
Article
Full-text available
This research provides the first support for a possible psychological universal: Human beings around the world derive emotional benefits from using their financial resources to help others (prosocial spending). In Study 1, survey data from 136 countries were examined and showed that prosocial spending is associated with greater happiness around the...
Chapter
Between 1995 and 1999, $9,000 billion was spent by North American and Western European firms on mergers and acquisitions (M&As)1; a near incomprehensible figure which, by way of comparison, was about seven times the UK’s gross domestic product (GDP), and more than 20 times that of the Netherlands (Schenk, 2003) in the same period. So large was the...
Article
Full-text available
Acquiring greater financial resources before having children seems like an intuitive strategy for people to en-hance their well-being during parenthood. However, research suggests that affluence may activate an agentic orientation, propelling people to pursue personal goals and independence from others, creating a conflict with the communal nature...
Article
Full-text available
The present research demonstrates that pride has divergent effects on prejudice, exacerbating or attenuating evaluative biases against stigmatized groups, depending on the form of pride experienced. Specifically, three experiments found that hubristic pride--associated with arrogance and self-aggrandizement--promotes prejudice and discrimination, w...
Article
Full-text available
This research provides the first support for a possible psychological universal: human beings around the world derive emotional benefits from using their financial resources to help others (prosocial spending). Analyzing survey data from 136 countries, we show that prosocial spending is consistently associated with greater happiness. To test for ca...
Article
The present study examined how financial decisions 'get under the skin'. Participants played an economic game in which they could donate some of their payment to another student. Affect was measured afterward and salivary cortisol was measured before and afterward. Participants who kept more money for themselves reported less positive affect, more...
Article
We present behavioral mimicry as a social cue for creative thinking. Specifically, we argue that being mimicked by an interaction partner cues convergent thinking by signalling a social opportunity for collaboration, while not being mimicked cues divergent thinking by signalling a social demand for improvisation and innovation. To test this theory,...
Article
We present a novel role of affect in the expression of culture. Four experiments tested whether individuals' affective states moderate the expression of culturally normative cognitions and behaviors. We consistently found that value expressions, self-construals, and behaviors were less consistent with cultural norms when individuals were experienci...
Article
Although there has been increasing interest in the role of affect in work settings, the impact of moods and emotions in strategic decision making remains largely unexplored. In this essay, we address this shortcoming by proposing a conceptual model of strategic decision making that incorporates, at its core, the impact of affective states on cognit...
Article
The present research demonstrates that people overestimate the intensity of their emotional responses to grand-scale tragedies. Participants predicted that they would feel significantly worse if thousands of people were killed in a disaster than if only a few people were killed, and yet they exhibited an “emotional flatline,” feeling equally sad re...
Article
Research suggests that negative affect triggers a variety of cognitive and behavioral responses designed to re-affirm and strengthen one's sense of self. In the current research, four studies explored the hypothesis that negative affect would also intensify the expression of culture consistent self-construals. Using an implicit measure of self-cons...
Article
Full-text available
Previous research has demonstrated that nonconscious interpersonal mimicry engenders liking, affiliation, empathy, and other positive social consequences. Some of these consequences have recently been shown to go beyond the dyad. In other words, interpersonal mimicry not only affects the way we feel toward our immediate interaction partner, but als...
Article
Historically, research in organizational behavior has denied and even denounced the presence and impact of emotions in the workplace. Today, after little more than 10 years of research on emotions in the workplace, organizational behavior scholars look to emotions as an important determinant of nearly every facet of workplace behavior. From interpe...
Article
Full-text available
In two studies, the authors examined whether people who are high in emotional intelligence (EI) make more accurate forecasts about their own affective responses to future events. All participants completed a performance measure of EI (the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test) as well as a self-report measure of EI. Affective forecasting...
Article
We systematically analyze the role of social comparison processes in organizations. Specifically, we describe how social comparison processes have been used to explain six key areas of organizational inquiry: (1) organizational justice, (2) performance appraisal, (3) virtual work environments, (4) affective behavior in the workplace, (5) stress, an...
Article
Since its publication in 1996, Affective Events Theory (AET) has come to be regarded as the seminal explanation for structure, causes and consequences of affective experiences at work. AET does not, however, elucidate why, how and when objects and events in the worplace trigger moods and emotions which in turn influence cognitive and behavioral out...
Article
In this chapter we present a review of some of the main threads of research on the role played by emotion and affect in organizations. In this respect, we refute the notion that organizations are totally rational., where the role of emotion is something that can be discounted or 'managed' out of existence.
Article
Since its publication in 1996, Affective Events Theory (AET) has come to be regarded as the seminal explanation for structure, causes and consequences of affective experiences at work. AET does not, however, elucidate why, how, and when objects and events in the workplace trigger moods and emotions which in turn influence cognitive and behavioral o...
Article
We review the literature on stress in organizational settings and, based on a model of job insecurity and emotional intelligence by Jordan, Ashkanasy and Härtel (2002), present a new model where affective responses associated with stress mediate the impact of workplace stressors on individual and organizational performance outcomes. Consistent with...

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (2)
Project
Pain: speaking the threshold Collaborators: Prof Sharon Morris Slade School of Fine Art, UCL Dr Deborah Padfield Slade School of Fine Art, UCL Prof Joanna M. Zakrzewska University College London Hospitals, NHS Foundation Trust (UCLH) Pain: Speaking the Threshold is a three-year interdisciplinary project to further research the value of visual images in the diagnosis and management of chronic pain. Funding comes from the Centre for Humanities Interdisciplinary Research Projects (CHIRP) Scheme. It brings together art and medicine in the tradition of the founding professors of the Slade who were also surgeons, addressing the public understanding of pain through both science and the humanities. The project builds on the face2face project at University College London Hospitals (UCLH) and the doctoral research of Deborah Padfield, co-supervised by Dr. Sharon Morris (Slade School of Fine Art, UCL) and Prof. Joanna M. 
Zakrzewska (UCLH). Accessing Prof. Zakrzewska’s clinics, Padfield co-created with patients over 1,000 photographic images that reflected and symbolised their pain. From this material Padfield made a pilot pack of 54 pain cards, which were trialed as a communication tool in clinical consultations at UCLH. Video recording were made of 20 base-line consultations, without images, and 20 study consultations with images. Taking unique data (video recordings and transcripts of pain consultations and co-created photographic images of pain) a new expanded interdisciplinary team will produce an in-depth analysis of the effects of using visual imagery in the clinical setting, using theories of narrative, metaphor and translation drawn from Linguistics; methodologies in Medical Anthropology and History of Medicine; theories of empathy and transference from Health Psychology and Psychoanalysis. The project hopes to evidence ways in which photographs of pain placed between clinician and patient can increase rapport and improve the quality of medical dialogue. Interdisciplinary team: Prof Joanna Bourke: History: Birkbeck College Dr Sahra Gibbon: Medical Anthropology: UCL Helen Omand: Art Psychotherapy: The Studio Upstairs Prof Elena Semino: Linguistics and English Language: Lancaster University Dr Amanda C de C Williams: Psychology: UCL & UCLH Research Assistants: Judy Addai-Davis Research Department of Clinical, Educational & Health Psychology, UCL Tom Chadwick MSc, Social Research Methods, LSE Project Assistant: Mariana Gomes Goncalves MFA, Fine Art, Slade School of Fine Art For further information please contact: d.padfield@ucl.ac.uk See also: Information about 'Pain Speaking the Threshold Information about Deborah Padfield