Christos Bechlivanidis

Christos Bechlivanidis
University College London | UCL · Department of Experimental Psyshology

Doctor of Philosophy

About

19
Publications
3,865
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
207
Citations
Introduction
Skills and Expertise

Publications

Publications (19)
Preprint
In the last decade there has been a proliferation of research on misinformation. One important aspect that receives less attention is why exactly misinformation is a problem. To adequately address this question, we must determine its cause(s) and effect(s). This review therefore explores the way different disciplines (computer science, economics, h...
Article
The goal of perception is to infer the most plausible source of sensory stimulation. Unisensory perception of temporal order, however, appears to require no inference, because the order of events can be uniquely determined from the order in which sensory signals arrive. Here, we demonstrate a novel perceptual illusion that casts doubt on this intui...
Article
Full-text available
The present study examined the role of individual differences (e.g., age, gender, education level, political affiliation, religiosity) and stance (general vs. personal) on contexts associated with manipulations without awareness. In all three studies, people were presented with several real-world contexts. They first rated the extent to which there...
Article
A significant challenge for recommender systems (RSs), and in fact for AI systems in general, is the systematic definition of explanations for outputs in such a way that both the explanations and the systems themselves are able to adapt to their human users' needs. In this paper we propose an RS hosting a vast repertoire of explanations, which are...
Conference Paper
As AI systems become ever more intertwined in our personal lives, the way in which they explain themselves to and interact with humans is an increasingly critical research area. The explanation of recommendations is thus a pivotal functionality in a user’s experience of a recommender system (RS), providing the possibility of enhancing many of its d...
Preprint
Full-text available
Mechanisms play a central role in how we think about causality, yet not all causal explanations describe mechanisms. Across four experiments, we find that people evaluate explanations differently depending on whether or not they include mechanisms. Despite common wisdom suggesting that explanations ought to be simple (appealing to as few causes as...
Preprint
What are the criteria that people use to evaluate everyday explanations? We focus on simplicity, coherence, and unification. We consider various operationalizations of each construct within the context of explanations to measure how people respond to them. With regard to simplicity, some of the psychological literature suggests that people do have...
Article
Although it has long been known that time is a cue to causation, recent work with adults has demonstrated that causality can also influence the experience of time. In causal reordering (Bechlivanidis & Lagnado, 2013, 2016) adults tend to report the causally consistent order of events, rather than the correct temporal order. However, the effect has...
Chapter
Full-text available
What are the criteria that people use to evaluate everyday explanations? This chapter focuses on simplicity, coherence, and unification. It considers various operationalizations of each construct within the context of explanations to measure how people respond to them. With regard to simplicity, some of the psychological literature suggests that pe...
Article
Full-text available
Current theories of causality from visual input predict causal impressions only in the presence of realistic interactions, sequences of events that have been frequently encountered in the past of the individual or of the species. This strong requirement limits the capacity for 1-shot induction and, thus, does not sit well with our abilities for rap...
Preprint
While it has long been known that time is a cue to causation, recent work with adults has demonstrated that causality can also influence the experience of time. In causal reordering (Bechlivanidis & Lagnado, 2013, 2016) adults tend to report the causally consistent order of events, rather than the correct temporal order. Across four experiments, 4-...
Article
Full-text available
A number of philosophers argue for the value of abstraction in explanation. According to these prescriptive theories, an explanation becomes superior when it leaves out details that make no difference to the occurrence of the event one is trying to explain (the explanandum). Abstract explanations are not frugal placeholders for improved, detailed f...
Article
Full-text available
People frequently rely on explanations provided by others to understand complex phenomena. A fair amount of attention has been devoted to the study of scientific explanation, and less on understanding how people evaluate naturalistic, everyday explanations. Using a corpus of diverse explanations from Reddit's "Explain Like I'm Five" and other onlin...
Thesis
Do causes always precede their effects? Can we affect the past? Or is the unidirectionality of time a consequence of the causal fabric that makes up our universe? The relationship between causality and temporality is an intriguing subject for physicists, philosophers and fans of science fiction. In psychology, causal and temporal perception have be...
Article
Full-text available
Traditional approaches to human causal reasoning assume that the perception of temporal order informs judgments of causal structure. In this article, we present two experiments in which people followed the opposite inferential route: Perceptual judgments of temporal order were instead influenced by causal beliefs. By letting participants freely int...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Would Dan have died if Bob hadn't shot? In this paper, we show that people's answer depends on whether or not they are asked about what would have caused Bob not to shoot. Some-thing needs to change in order to turn an actual world into a counterfactual world. Previous findings of how people reason about counterfactuals have been mixed: sometimes p...

Network

Cited By