Christopher C Rosen

Christopher C Rosen
University of Arkansas | U of A

PhD

About

49
Publications
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5,383
Citations

Publications

Publications (49)
Article
Person-centered approaches to organizational scholarship can provide critical insights into how sets of related constructs uniquely combine to predict outcomes. Within micro topics, scholars have begun to embrace the use of latent profile analysis (LPA), identifying constellations of constructs related to organizational commitment, turnover intenti...
Chapter
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In recent years, practitioners have identified a number of problems with traditional performance management (PM) systems, arguing that PM is broken and needs to be fixed. In this chapter, we review criticisms of traditional PM practices that have been mentioned by journalists and practitioners and we consider the solutions that they have presented...
Article
Full-text available
Scholars have paid an increasing amount of attention to organizational citizenship behaviors (OCB), with a particular emphasis on helping others at work. Additionally, recent empirical work has focused on how OCB is an intra-individual phenomenon, such that employees vary daily in the extent to which they help others. However, one limitation of thi...
Article
A widespread methodological concern in the organizational literature is the possibility that observed results are due to the influence of common-method variance or mono-method bias. This concern is based on a conception of method variance as being produced by the nature of the method itself, and therefore, variables assessed with the same method wo...
Article
The need for registered nurses in the United States continues to grow. To meet this need for increased numbers of nurses, recruitment and retention of qualified nurse educators has become a priority. In addition, the factors associated with nursing faculties' intent to stay have emerged as important considerations for administrators. The concepts o...
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Despite a widespread belief in both the academic and public policy literatures that working long hours is deleterious to health and well-being, our critical review of this large and complex literature fails to support a robust direct causal effect of work hours on either physical or mental well-being outcomes. Large-scale epidemiological studies, m...
Article
Drawing from Johns’s theory of self-serving behavior, we identified workplace politics as a contextual factor that affects the relative costs and benefits associated with supervisor rating behaviors. Our investigation tested these ideas by considering how politics influence the way in which raters combine information when evaluating subordinate per...
Article
Background: In nursing education, the academic administrator is critical given the multitude of challenges associated with program delivery (e.g., shortages of faculty, strict and changing regulations for program accreditation, and the sheer demand for more nurses). Unfortunately, with the focus on recruiting and retaining new novice faculty to te...
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Incivility at work—low intensity deviant behaviors with an ambiguous intent to harm—has been on the rise, yielding negative consequences for employees’ well-being and companies’ bottom-lines. Although examinations of incivility have gained momentum in organizational research, theory and empirical tests involving dynamic, within-person processes ass...
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Self-determination theory (SDT) conceptualizes basic psychological needs for autonomy, competence, and relatedness as innate and essential for ongoing psychological growth, internalization, and well-being. We broadly review the literature on basic psychological need satisfaction at work with three more specific aims: to test SDT’s requirement that...
Article
Popular press accounts and an emerging research literature suggest that organizations increasingly face the prospect of managing employees who are highly entitled, yet relatively little research has explored entitlement in work settings. Moreover, the limited existing research has considered entitlement through a narrow lens, primarily viewing enti...
Article
Although core self-evaluation (CSE) is a significant personality predictor of work outcomes, additional research that assesses the structural validity of CSE is needed. It has been suggested that the inclusion of locus of control may have biased past CSE findings because this trait is better suited as a core evaluation of the environment. We invest...
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Employee physical activity initiatives are commonplace, but management scholarship has not kept pace with theoretical and empirical work to validate such initiatives. In this Incubator, we clarify the employee physical activity construct, present mechanisms linking physical activity to organizationally-valued outcomes, and consider the dark side of...
Article
Responding to criticisms surrounding the structural validity of the higher-order core self-evaluations (CSE) construct, in the current study we examined the appropriateness of including locus of control as an indicator of CSE. Drawing from both theoretical and empirical evidence, we argue that locus of control is more heavily influenced by evaluati...
Article
Full-text available
Stressor and exchange relationship paradigms have developed in isolation from each other to explain the negative effects of perceived organizational politics. We outline how these different paradigms share a common basis-a focus on psychological need satisfaction- and develop a needs-based paradigm to account for the negative effects of perceived o...
Article
The current study tested the theoretically relevant, yet previously unexamined, role of rumination on the relationship between politics perceptions and a variety of threat responses. Drawing from Response Styles Theory, it was argued that rumination amplifies the effects of politics by enhancing the influence of negative information on cognition, i...
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Full-text available
Research examining the relationship between work stress and well-being has flourished over the past 20 years. At the same time, research on physiological stress processes has also advanced significantly. One of the major advances in this literature has been the emergence of the Allostatic Load model as a central organizing theory for understanding...
Article
Previous research has found considerable variation in risk taking behavior within individuals across tasks. In this paper, we develop a hypothesis derived from the psychology literature that such apparently inconsistent behavior can be explained by a subject's domain specific risk attitudes. To test our hypothesis, we conducted a laboratory study u...
Article
Purpose The purpose of the study was to examine the joint moderating effects of employees’ conscientiousness and self-monitoring on the relationship between perceptions of organizational politics and organizational citizenship behaviors. Design/Methodology/Approach Data were collected from 139 subordinate–supervisor dyads through networks of busine...
Article
Full-text available
We develop and test an integrative framework that identifies the underlying psychological mechanisms that relate organizational politics to task performance, citizenship, and counterproductive behaviors. In addition, we identify political skill as a moderator of the effects of politics on proximal outcomes, including strain and psychological contra...
Article
The decision to undertake risk is often made by pairs (dyads), while much of the economics literature on risk taking focuses on the individual. We report the results of controlled laboratory experiments that compare behavior between individuals and pairs. Using the Holt and Laury (2002) procedure and a within-subjects design, we find that pair choi...
Article
Integrating implications from regulatory focus and approach/avoidance motivation theories, we present a framework wherein motivational orientations toward positive (approach motivation orientation) or negative (avoidance motivation orientation) stimuli interact with workplace success to mediate the relation of core self-evaluation (CSE) with job sa...
Article
In recent decades, there has been a proliferation of higher-order multidimensional constructs in the management and psychology literatures. Unfortunately, few guidelines have been presented for assessing the appropriateness of these constructs. In the current paper, the authors present seven recommendations for evaluating the construct clarity of m...
Article
There is a long history of received doctrines in the social and behavioral sciences where a concept is accepted as true without any empirical support (Barrett, 1972; Means, 1965). Margaret Mead's (1928) Coming of Age in Samoa is an early example (see Freeman, 1983, 1999). Following their acceptance, received doctrines usually then pass into th...
Article
Core self-evaluation (CSE) represents the fundamental appraisals individuals make about their self-worth and capabilities. CSE is conceptualized as a higher order construct composed of broad and evaluative traits (e.g., self-esteem and generalized self-efficacy). The authors review 15 years of CSE theory and research, focusing in particular on the...
Article
Core self-evaluation (CSE) represents the fundamental appraisals individuals make about their self-worth and capabilities. CSE is conceptualized as a higher order construct composed of broad and evaluative traits (e.g., self-esteem and generalized self-efficacy). The authors review 15 years of CSE theory and research, focusing in particular on the...
Article
The use of higher-order multidimensional constructs (i.e., latent constructs comprised of standalone variables) in the organizational psychology and behavior literatures is becoming commonplace. Despite their advantages (e.g., greater parsimony and bandwidth), the development and validation of such constructs often unfolds in an indiscriminant fash...
Article
Full-text available
This study investigates the role of leader—member exchange in moderating the effects of perceptions of organizational justice and politics on job performance. In contrast to previous research, which has relied on social exchange theory to explain these relationships, the current study uses uncertainty management theory to propose that relationships...
Article
Core self-evaluations (CSE) represent a new personality construct that, despite an accumulation of evidence regarding its predictive validity, provokes debate regarding the fundamental approach or avoidance nature of the construct. This set of studies sought to clarify the approach/avoidance nature of CSE by examining its relation with approach/avo...
Article
Idiosyncratic deals (or i-deals) are mutually beneficial, personalized agreements of a nonstandard nature that are negotiated between individual employees and their employers. This article outlines the development of a 16-item measure of i-deals negotiated by job incumbents. Across four studies, the authors developed a reliable scale with a multidi...
Article
Across 2 experiments, we examined motivational processes elicited by justice-related experiences. Specifically, we examined the effects of justice on recipients' self-identity and regulatory focus. As predicted, those who experienced unfairness had a strong individual identity and prevention focus owing to the threats of social rejection and econom...
Article
Researchers are often concerned with common method variance (CMV) in cases where it is believed to bias relationships of predictors with criteria. However, CMV may also bias relationships within sets of predictors; this is cause for concern, given the rising popularity of higher order multidimensional constructs. The authors examined the extent to...
Chapter
This chapter provides an updated review of research examining the relationship between occupational stressors and job performance. We begin by presenting an eight-category taxonomy of workplace stressors and we then review theories that explain the relationships between workplace stressors and job performance. The subsequent literature review is di...
Article
Full-text available
The current study tested a model that links perceptions of organizational politics to job performance and "turnover intentions" (intentions to quit). Meta-analytic evidence supported significant, bivariate relationships between perceived politics and strain (.48), turnover intentions (.43), job satisfaction (--.57), affective commitment (--.54), ta...
Article
This study examines how employees' perceptions of specific features of the organizational context--organizational politics and procedural justice--are related to their evaluations of psychological contract breach and subsequent attitudes and behaviors. Across three studies, we examined the appropriateness of four models for describing relationships...
Article
Full-text available
Using affective events theory as a framework, this study examined the role of emotions in mediating the effects of perceived politics on adverse employee outcomes. The authors proposed that frustration translates employees' perceptions of politics into lower levels of performance and increased organizational withdrawal (i.e. turnover intentions) th...
Article
The article discusses idiosyncratic deals (i-deals) between individuals and the companies they work for, which are characterized in terms of nonstandard degrees of work hour flexibility, customized workload and career development opportunities, and unique financial incentives. The question of what contexts are likely to give rise to i-deals and wha...
Article
Most organizations are holders of sanctioned and unsanctioned secrets. While some secrets such as product formulas are necessary and ethical, others such as hiding the negative health effects of smoking tobacco are unethical. We examine secrets along two dimensions: The first one examines the beneficiaries and victims/targets of a secret while the...
Article
The theory of core self-evaluation (CSE) has provided organizational scholars with a framework for describing disposition-based effects on work attitudes and behaviors. Although the CSE construct has been useful for predicting various phenomena, there are potential weaknesses concerning how it is conceptualized and used. We review limitations regar...
Article
This study measures risk attitudes using two paid experiments: the Holt and Laury (2002) procedure and a variation of the game show Deal or No Deal. The participants also completed a series of personality questionnaires developed in the psychology literature including the risk domains of Weber, Blais, and Betz (2002). As in previous studies risk at...
Article
Full-text available
The authors proposed a model suggesting that organizational environments supporting high levels of informal supervisor and coworker feedback are associated with lower employee perceptions of organizational politics. Furthermore, these lowered perceptions of politics were proposed to result in higher employee morale (as reflected in job satisfaction...
Article
The differential effects of non-contingent positive and negative reinforcement operations on the acquisition of superstitious behaviors and rules were investigated in two experiments. College students were instructed to try to produce and/or keep the word “GOOD” on a computer screen (positive reinforcement), or to try to prevent and/or remove the w...
Article
Full-text available
The decision to undertake risk is often made in groups, while much of the economics literature on risk taking focuses on the individual. We report the results of controlled laboratory experiments that compare behavior between individuals and pairs. Using the Holt and Laury (2002) procedure and a within–subject design, we find no evidence of group p...

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