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Christopher Nagy

Christopher Nagy
Mianus River Gorge

PhD

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34
Publications
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251
Citations

Publications

Publications (34)
Article
Full-text available
To more easily and non-invasively monitor urban Eastern Screech-Owl populations, we developed a method of distinguishing individual owls using their calls. A set of seven variables derived from recordings of ‘bounce’ calls taken from 10 known (either free-ranging birds recorded at a single site on a single night or identifiable captive owls) owls w...
Article
Full-text available
More than a decade has passed since the catastrophic population decline in Gyps species was reported from South Asia, but much uncertainty remains about quantifying their short-term extinction risk. To estimate the future extinction risk of the white-rumped vulture Gyps bengalensis in Nepal, we conducted counts at 7 nesting colonies between 2002 an...
Article
Full-text available
We characterized the landscape-level habitat use of Megascops asio (Eastern Screech Owl) in a suburban/urban region of New York and Connecticut using citizenscience methodologies and GIS-based land-use information. Volunteers sampled their properties using call-playback surveys in the summers of 2009 and 2010. We modeled detection and occupancy as...
Article
Full-text available
Little is known about the distribution and spatial ecology of Canis latrans (Coyote) within New York City (NYC), one of the largest and most densely populated cities in the world. To determine the overall distribution, site-specific breeding status, and seasonal occupancy patterns of this species in New York City, we used camera traps to monitor se...
Article
Overbrowsing by highly abundant white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) negatively impacts the regeneration of the forest understory throughout the eastern United States. Deer management programs are often used by land managers to reduce deer densities and promote forest regeneration. This study examines the impact of a 15-year-long archery-base...
Article
Full-text available
Carnivores are currently colonizing cities where they were previously absent. These urban environments are novel ecosystems characterized by habitat degradation and fragmentation, availability of human food, and different prey assemblages than surrounding areas. Coyotes ( Canis latrans ) established a breeding population in New York City (NYC) over...
Article
Full-text available
Coyotes are ubiquitous on the North American landscape as a result of their recent expansion across the continent. They have been documented in the heart of some of the most urbanized cities, such as Chicago, Los Angeles, and New York City. Here, we explored the genomic composition of 16 coyotes in the New York metropolitan area to investigate geno...
Article
Full-text available
Urbanization can have profound consequences for mammalian biodiversity and is thought to contribute to patterns of species richness and community composition. Large cities can be particularly challenging environments for mammals because these habitats are often impacted by anthropogenic perturbations, including high human population density, fragme...
Article
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Mammalian carnivores are elusive and enigmatic species that often play keystone roles in ecosystems through direct and indirect effects. Growing evidence shows that human activity can impact carnivore behavior and community structure by altering predator-prey interactions, shifting diel activity patterns, and altering wildlife movement. Our goal wa...
Article
Full-text available
Managing wildlife populations in the face of global change requires regular data on the abundance and distribution of wild animals but acquiring these over appropriate spatial scales in a sustainable way has proven challenging. Here we present the data from Snapshot USA 2020, a second annual national mammal survey of the United States of America. T...
Article
Full-text available
Managing wildlife populations in the face of global change requires regular data on the abundance and distribution of wild animals, but acquiring these over appropriate spatial scales in a sustainable way has proven challenging. Here we present the data from Snapshot USA 2020, a second annual national mammal survey of the locations across 103 array...
Article
Full-text available
With the accelerating pace of global change, it is imperative that we obtain rapid inventories of the status and distribution of wildlife for ecological inferences and conservation planning. To address this challenge, we launched the SNAPSHOT USA project, a collaborative survey of terrestrial wildlife populations using camera traps across the Unite...
Article
Full-text available
Little is known about the relatedness structure of carnivores living in urban areas, where green spaces may vary in size and resource availability. We examined the minimum population size, relatedness structure, and genetic diversity of a recently established population of eastern coyotes (Canis latrans) inhabiting New York City (NYC). The populati...
Article
Full-text available
For the past 200 years, coyotes have steadily expanded their range eastward from the Midwestern USA. They have successfully colonized the contiguous landscape east of the Mississippi River and have been documented on Long Island, New York since 2009 with successful breeding confirmed in 2016. Occupying a diverse array of habitat types along the way...
Article
Full-text available
Theory predicts that range expansion results in genetic diversity loss in colonizing populations. Rapid reduction of population size exacerbates negative effects of genetic drift, while sustained isolation decreases neutral variation. Amid this demographic change, natural selection can act to maintain functional diversity. Thus, characterizing neut...
Presentation
Full-text available
Monika Ryzcek's final research report, presented at the High School for Environmental Studies 2018 Research Symposium. Monika is now an alum of the Mianus River Gorge's Wildlife Technician Program, a 2.5 year mentorship program for high school students interested in ecological research. Monika used count (N-mixture) models to examine coyote distri...
Poster
Full-text available
Made a script to get rid of the noise associated with seasonal changes in sunrise/sunset and day/night lengths encountered with activity patterns and other time-of-day studies. Email chris@mianus.org if you want the R code. Frequently updated so I don't upload it here
Article
Full-text available
Coyotes (Canislatrans Say, 1823) have increased their range dramatically over the past century. Formerly restricted to western North America, they now roam across the continent, in many habitats including large cities. One of the last areas in North America without coyotes has been Long Island, NY, a 3629 km2 island in the New York metropolitan are...
Presentation
Full-text available
Magle et al. (2015) examined the distribution of coyotes and other medium-sized mammals in relation to landscape and socioeconomic factors in Chicago using camera traps. They found that socioeconomic factors (e.g., mean household income, age of neighborhood) were equally as important as habitat factors (e.g., patch area, amount of forest, grassland...
Article
Full-text available
Currently, Long Island, NY is without a breeding population of northeastern coyote (Canis latras var.), yet recent evidence of dispersing individuals on the island, coupled with the “dogged” momentum of coyote range expansion across North America, suggests a Long Island coyote population is close at hand. We highlighted the fleeting opportunity to...
Article
Full-text available
Severe fragmentation is a typical fate of native remnant habitats in cities, and urban wildlife with limited dispersal ability are predicted to lose genetic variation in isolated urban patches. However, little information exists on the characteristics of urban green spaces required to conserve genetic variation. In this study, we examine whether is...
Preprint
Full-text available
Severe fragmentation is a typical fate of native remnant habitats in cities, and urban wildlife with limited dispersal ability are predicted to lose genetic variation in isolated urban patches. However, little information exists on the characteristics of urban green spaces required to conserve genetic variation. In this study, we examine whether is...
Preprint
Severe fragmentation is a typical fate of native remnant habitats in cities, and urban wildlife with limited dispersal ability are predicted to lose genetic variation in isolated urban patches. However, little information exists on the characteristics of urban green spaces required to conserve genetic variation. In this study, we examine whether is...
Preprint
Full-text available
Severe fragmentation is a typical fate of native remnant habitats in cities, and urban wildlife with limited dispersal ability are predicted to lose genetic variation in isolated urban patches. However, little information exists on the extent of habitat required in urban green spaces to conserve genetic variation. In this study, we examine whether...
Article
Full-text available
Eastern screech owls (Megascops asio) exist in a number of urban parks in New York City (NYC) and Westchester County, NY. To investigate the effects of intense urbanization on this species, we performed call-broadcast surveys in 16 parks in NYC and Westchester. Occupancy and detection were modelled as functions of eight geographic variables and the...
Article
Full-text available
We evaluated the accuracy of a previously published model of coyote (Canis latrans) sightings in suburban Westchester County, New York. This model was originally developed using citizen reports of coyote sightings to predict the probability of a human-coyote interaction based on proximity to habitat features. Because the data were obtained from sur...
Article
Full-text available
The southern Appalachian millipeds Boraria stricta (Brölemann, 1896) and B. infesta (Chamberlin, 1918) (Diplopoda: Polydesmida: Xystodesmidae) have become established in Westchester Co., New York, and Hartford Co., Connecticut, respectively. Only three individuals are available for the latter, but B. stricta has established a reproducing population...
Article
Full-text available
Japanese stilt grass (Microstegium vimineum) is an invasive grass in the eastern and midwestern United States. It tolerates a wide range of light and moisture conditions and has readily replaced native herbaceous vegetation in many areas. Despite its detrimental effects, Japanese stilt grass does provide some benefit, serving as habitat for ground...
Article
Full-text available
ABSTRACT The expansion of coyotes (Canis latrans) into the northeastern United States is a major challenge to wildlife professionals, especially in suburban and urban areas where reports of human—coyote interaction (HCI) are on the rise. To assist wildlife professionals in identifying potential hot spots of interaction and homeowners in evaluating...
Article
Eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis; hereafter hemlock) was once relatively common in the northeastern United States. However, recent disturbances – including exotic pests and white-tailed deer overpopulation – have exacerbated declines in hemlock forest in the 20th century. As a previously undisturbed stand, the Mianus River Gorge Preserve (MRGP) pr...

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Projects (3)
Project
The Mianus River Gorge (Bedford, NY) has run a deer management program on its lands since 2004. We monitor hunting effort, deer numbers, and vegetation to assess and adapt our program, while developing tools and strategies that can assist other land and wildlife managers across the region. WTD ecology and management is one of the biggest issues in wildlife ecology. We are always looking for ideas, collaborations, and partners in our area and beyond. Get in touch with Chris, chris@mianus.org, if you want to chat. mianus.org
Project
Researchers, educators, and students working together to study the ecology of the northeastern coyote in New York City and the region. gothamcoyote.org mianus.org