Christopher W Mckindsey

Christopher W Mckindsey
Fisheries and Oceans Canada | DFO · Maurice Lamontagne Institute (MLI)

PhD, Université Laval

About

178
Publications
49,110
Reads
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Citations
Introduction
I work in a very dynamic lab. Much of my current work involves using acoustic telemetry to better understand interactions between salmon and mussel aquaculture and decapods and basic macroinvertebrate movement ecology. Work is starting in 2022 on fish movements related to salmon farms. Work increasingly focuses on Arctic and sub-arctic systems and the ecology of fishes, kelps, and macroinvertebrates. Aquatic Invasive Species work focuses on Risk assessments in the context of global change.
Additional affiliations
September 2005 - present
Institut des sciences de la mer de Rimouski - ISMER
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
Description
  • Adjunct professor
July 2001 - December 2013
Fisheries and Oceans Canada
Description
  • Research Scientist
September 1999 - June 2001
The University of Sydney
Position
  • University of Sydney, Australia
Description
  • Post-doctoral studies
Education
September 1994 - May 1999
Laval University
Field of study
  • marine ecology
January 1990 - May 1993
Concordia University Montreal
Field of study
  • Parasitology

Publications

Publications (178)
Preprint
Background Acoustic telemetry allows detailed observations of the movement behaviour of many species and as tags get smaller, smaller organisms may be tagged. The number of studies using acoustic telemetry to evaluate marine invertebrate movement is growing, but novel attachment methods include unknowns about the effects of tagging procedures on in...
Article
Full-text available
The post-smolt phase is considered a critical period for Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar). Hence, identifying migration routes used by post-smolts is needed to protect the habitats they require to successfully complete their life cycle. We used a bio-physical model coupled with output from a water circulation model (FVCOM) to simulate dispersal of Atl...
Article
Full-text available
Shellfish and salmonid aquaculture operations in Eastern Canada attract several mobile epibenthic species as a result of added structural complexity and increased food availability (bivalve fall-off and waste salmonid feed). It is not clear whether the aggregation of predators and scavengers below coastal farms contributes positively or negatively...
Article
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Arctic ecosystems are changing rapidly due to global warming, industrial development, and economic growth. However, the ecological consequences for these ecosystems are difficult to predict due to limited knowledge on species abundance, distribution, and biodiversity patterns. This study evaluated the diversity and assemblage composition of epibent...
Article
Full-text available
Bivalve aquaculture sites attract a variety of large benthic species and past studies have shown that American lobster Homarus americanus are more abundant in mussel Mytilus edulis farms than in areas outside of them, suggesting that farms provide lobsters with adequate food and shelter. We used acoustic telemetry to evaluate the influence of longl...
Article
Full-text available
Mussel farming influences benthic environments by organic loading and the addition of physical structure within aquaculture leases. This study evaluated near-field (distance to mussel aquaculture structures, line-scale) and bay-scale (inside vs. outside a blue mussel, Mytilius edulis, farm) effects of an offshore mussel farm in Îles de la Madeleine...
Article
Full-text available
Ports play a central role in our society, but they entail potential environmental risks and stressors that may cause detrimental impacts to both neighboring natural ecosystems and human health. Port managers face multiple challenges to mitigate risks and avoid ecosystem impacts and should recognize that ports are embedded in the wider regional coas...
Article
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The coastal zone of the Canadian Arctic represents 10% of the world’s coastline and is one of the most rapidly changing marine regions on the planet. To predict the consequences of these environmental changes, a better understanding of how environmental gradients shape coastal habitat structure in this area is required. We quantified the abundance...
Article
Full-text available
The choice of the duration and frequency of sampling to detect relevant patterns in field experiments or for environmental monitoring is always challenging since time and material resources are limited. In practice, duration and frequency of sampling are often chosen based on logistical constraints, experience, or practices described in published w...
Poster
Full-text available
We investigated the diversity of the invertebrate communities relying on kelp exported detritus both at 10m (euphotic) and at 40m (dysphotic) depth in a subarctic system, and tested whether these commmunities would change according to the kelp species and level of freshness of the detritus. We hypothesized that some invertebrates would show prefere...
Article
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Free-living marine nematodes play a fundamental role in nutrient cycling and food web dynamics, serving as bioindicators of ecosystem health. Despite their ecological importance, nematode biodiversity remains largely unexplored in Arctic coastal waters. This study surveyed macrobenthic nematodes (> 500 µm) in the high and low intertidal, and shallo...
Article
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The Arctic is among the fastest warming areas of the globe. Understanding the impact of climate change on foundational Arctic marine species is needed to provide insight on ecological resilience at high latitudes. Marine forests, the underwater seascapes formed by seaweeds, are predicted to expand their ranges further north in the Arctic in a warme...
Article
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Ships and boats may transport whole communities of non-indigenous species (NIS) through hull biofouling, some members of which may become invasive. Several studies have evaluated the diversity of these communities, but very few have analyzed the survival of organisms after their voyages into different and potentially inhospitable conditions. This f...
Article
The expected increase of shipping activities in the Canadian Arctic is predicted to enhance potential introductions of non-indigenous species (NIS), including dinoflagellate taxa, which may have important ecological and economic impacts once released in a new environment. The lack of information about native species represents an obstacle in detect...
Article
Full-text available
The assessment of natural ecosystem status is a fundamental premise to enable environmental management at local scales to maintain ecosystem functioning, services and resilience. Ecologists have developed many biological and environmental indices to inform and support environmental management and policies. To promote efficient use of resources, exi...
Article
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Pressures from anthropogenic activities are causing degradation of estuarine and coastal ecosystems around the world. Trace metals are key pollutants that are released and can accumulate in a range of environmental compartments and are ultimately accumulated in exposed biota. The level of pressure varies with locations and the range and intensity o...
Article
Full-text available
Climate change is transforming marine ecosystems through the expansion and contraction of species’ ranges. Sea ice loss and warming temperatures are expected to expand habitat availability for macroalgae along long stretches of Arctic coastlines. To better understand the current distribution of kelp forests in the Eastern Canadian Arctic, kelps wer...
Article
Full-text available
The estuary and the Gulf of St. Lawrence (EGSL), eastern Canada form a vast inland sea that is subjected to numerous anthropogenic pressures. Management tools are needed to detect and quantify their effect on benthic communities. The aims of this study are to analyze the spatial distribution of epibenthic communities in the EGSL and quantify the im...
Preprint
The coastal zone of the Canadian Arctic represents 10% of the world’s coastline and is one of the most rapidly changing marine regions on the planet. To predict the consequences of these environmental changes, a better understanding of how environmental gradients shape coastal habitat structure in this area is required. We quantified the abundance...
Article
Full-text available
Decapod crustaceans are ecologically and economically important invertebrates but are vulnerable to anthropogenic pressures and climate change. Understanding their spatial ecology is essential for their management and conservation, with telemetry emerging as a useful tool to quantify space-use and movements. Here, we synthesize the use of telemetry...
Article
Several trace-elements have been identified as indicators of finfish aquaculture organic enrichment. In this study, sediment sampling at finfish farms was completed as part of an Aquaculture Monitoring Program in three distinct Canadian regions. Despite diverse datasets, multivariate analyses show a consistent clustering of known direct (Cu and Zn)...
Article
Full-text available
With the widespread influence of human activities on marine ecosystems, evaluation of ecological status provides valuable information for conservation initiatives and sustainable development. To this end, many environmental indicators have been developed worldwide and there is a growing need to evaluate their performance by calculating ecological s...
Article
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The increasing number and diversity of anthropogenic stressors in marine habitats have multiple negative impacts on biological systems, biodiversity and ecosystem functions. Methods to assess cumulative effects include experimental manipulations, which may identify non-linear responses (i.e. synergies, antagonisms). However, experiments designed to...
Article
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The Canadian Arctic is receiving increased ship traffic, largely related to non-renewable resource exploitation and facilitated by climate change. This traffic, much of which arrives in ballast, increases opportunities for the spread of aquatic invasive species (AIS). One of the regions at greatest risk is the Hudson Bay Complex. A horizon scanning...
Article
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To address the ongoing global biodiversity crisis, conservation approaches must be underpinned by robust information. Canada is uniquely positioned to contribute to meeting global biodiversity targets, with some of the world's largest remaining intact ecosystems, and a commitment to co-application of Indigenous ways of knowing alongside scientific,...
Article
Full-text available
Bivalve predation by seabream has been observed worldwide and is a major concern for bivalve farmers. Farmed bivalve-seabream interactions must be better understood to ensure the sustainability of bivalve aquaculture. The objectives of this study were to characterize gilthead seabream Sparus aurata presence in a bivalve farm in Prevost Lagoon (Medi...
Article
Full-text available
The relationship between larval supply and settlement is an integral part of the demographic processes of benthic marine organisms that determine their distribution at subsequent life stages. In ascidians, a strong positive relationship between larval supply and settlement has been previously documented, but only at small spatial scales (one locati...
Data
This dataset contains data described in the paper entitled 'Larval supply is a limited determinant of settlement at mesoscales across an anthropogenic seascape'. Data include larval abundance and recruitment densities of a non-native colonial ascidian, Botryllus schlosseri (Pallas, 1766), in a marina in Ben Eoin, Nova Scotia, Canada.
Article
Full-text available
Coastal ecosystems face increasing anthropogenic pressures worldwide and their management requires a solid assessment and understanding of the cumulative impacts from human activities. This study evaluates the spatial variation of benthic macrofaunal communities, sediments, and heavy metals in the sub-Arctic coastal ecosystems around Sept-Îles (Qué...
Article
Full-text available
The expansion of the aquaculture industry in the last several decades has raised concerns about potential ecological impacts of the industry. Bivalve culture, particularly mussel farming, relies on naturally occurring plankton and numerous studies have demonstrated top-down control on phytoplankton, increased nutrients through excretion of metaboli...
Article
Full-text available
The St. Lawrence is a vast and complex socio-ecological system providing a wealth of services that sustain numerous economic sectors. This ecosystem is subject to significant human pressures that overlap and potentially interact with climate-driven environmental changes. Our objective in this paper was to systematically characterize the distributio...
Article
Full-text available
The risk of aquatic invasions in the Arctic is expected to increase with climate warming, greater shipping activity, and resource exploitation in the region. Planktonic and benthic marine aquatic invasive species (AIS) with the greatest potential for invasion and impact in the Canadian Arctic were identified and the 23 riskiest species were modelle...
Article
Full-text available
Fatty acids (FAs) are a common tool to investigate trophic ecology due to the transfer of several FAs across trophic levels. However, some dietary FAs are modified to maintain homeostasis. Therefore, for trophic purposes, there is the question of whether to separate lipid fractions into fatty acids that are physiologically regulated (structural, po...
Article
Coastal benthic ecosystems may be impacted by numerous human activities, including aquaculture, which continues to expand rapidly. Indeed, today aquacul- ture worldwide provides more biomass for human consumption than do wild fisheries. This rapid development raises questions about the interactions the practice has with the surrounding environment....
Article
An L-shaped shell deformity (LSSD) on the posterior shell edge is known exclusively in wild mytilid mussels infected with photosynthetic Coccomyxa-like algae. LSSD forms due to the appearance of extra shell material; it is only possible if the mussel is heavily infected with the alga. Traditionally, observation of high amount of the green spots (al...
Presentation
Full-text available
With the development of coastal human activities comes the growing need to develop methods to describe and predict their cumulative impacts on marine benthic communities locally, which rank among the most vulnerable communities in marine ecosystems. Local assessments facilitate dialogue between multiple users of the ecosystem (industries, individua...
Article
Full-text available
Rock crab Cancer irroratus and American lobster Homarus americanus are important commercial species in coastal areas where intensive salmon aquaculture occurs in eastern Canada. Such aquaculture releases organic wastes, especially feed waste (i.e. food pellets made in part from terrestrial feed ingredients). Terrestrial compounds from feed wastes w...
Article
Full-text available
Arctic biodiversity has long been poorly documented and is now facing rapid transformations due to ongoing climate change and other impacts, including shipping activities. These changes are placing marine coastal invertebrate communities at greater risk, especially in sensitive areas such as commercial ports. Preserving biodiversity is a significan...
Article
The posterior shell edge (PSE) of wild mytilid mussels that are highly infected with unicellular photosynthetic green algae Coccomyxa sp. exhibits an extra shell material (ESM). A recently proposed mechanism of ESM formation shows similarity with light-enhanced calcification (LEC), i.e., algae photosynthesis mediates low respiratory CO2 level in sh...
Article
Full-text available
We developed a new predictive approach to evaluate the relative invasion hazard posed by recreational boats as vectors for non-indigenous species (NIS) in marine ecoregions on the Atlantic coast of Canada. It combines data from behavioral boater questionnaires, surveys of boat macrofouling, and an extensive NIS monitoring program in marinas. The re...
Article
Although many studies have described the influence of bivalve aquaculture on the benthic environment, effects on benthic functional diversity are poorly known, as are links with ecosystem processes. We investigated the response of a benthic ecosystem in terms of taxonomic and functional diversity (infauna >500 μm), biogeochemical indicators (organi...
Article
Full-text available
Anthropogenic subsidies to natural systems can influence the diet of mobile omnivore species and co-occurring species. This study assessed if fall-off from mussel aquaculture subsidized wild populations of mobile scavengers and predators, such as the commercially important lobster Homarus americanus. A Bayesian stable isotope-mixing model with para...
Presentation
Full-text available
Presentation of the results obtained for chapter 1 of my PhD, which have been presented in the book 'Observatoire de la Baie de Sept-Îles'. (presentation in French)
Article
Full-text available
Climate change is impacting environmental conditions, especially with respect to temperature and ice cover in high latitude regions. Predictive models and risk assessment are key tools for understanding potential changes associated with such impacts on coastal regions. In this study relative ecological risk assessment was done for future potential...
Data
Complete information on ballast water discharged at each Canadian Arctic port through international vessels with ballast water from regions where Mya arenaria is present. Volumes are given in metric tons (MT). Correction factor for ballast water exchange: 1 (no exchange), 0.1 (mid ocean exchange (MOE), considered for ships with a saline/brackish ba...
Data
Complete information on ballast water discharged at each Canadian Arctic port through international vessels with ballast water from regions where Littorina littorea is present. Volumes are given in metric tons (MT). Correction factor for ballast water exchange: 1 (no exchange), 0.1 (mid ocean exchange (MOE), considered for ships with a saline/brack...
Data
Complete information on ballast water discharged at each Canadian Arctic port through international vessels with ballast water from regions where Paralithodes camtschaticus is present. Volumes are given in metric tons (MT). Correction factor for ballast water exchange: 1 (no exchange), 0.1 (mid ocean exchange (MOE), considered for ships with a sali...
Data
Complete information on ballast water discharged at each Canadian Arctic port through domestic vessels with ballast water from regions where Littorina littorea is present. Volumes are given in metric tons (MT). Correction factor for ballast water exchange: 1 (no exchange), 0.1 (mid ocean exchange (MOE), considered for ships with a saline/brackish b...
Data
Complete information on ballast water discharged at each Canadian Arctic port through domestic vessels with ballast water from regions where Mya arenaria is present. Volumes are given in metric tons (MT). Correction factor for ballast water exchange: 1 (no exchange), 0.1 (mid ocean exchange (MOE), considered for ships with a saline/brackish ballast...
Data
Ports showing locations and habitat sensitivity according to the overlap of sensitivity variables. (PDF)
Data
Potential impact of the species assessed according to known effects in invaded environments. (DOCX)
Poster
Full-text available
This poster compiles works done during my PhD. chapters 2 and 3, and was presented during the 16th scientific assembly of Québec-Océan and the 3rd Canadian Healthy Oceans Network II's meeting at Ottawa. This poster won the Best Poster Award.
Poster
Full-text available
Human activities such as maritime transport, fishing and aquaculture create environmental stressors affecting the structure and the functioning of benthic communities. While these disturbances can act individually, they can also act synergistically and lead to changes more difficult to predict. This project is part of the Canadian healthy oceans ne...
Poster
Full-text available
A regional assessment of cumulative impacts is required for the Estuary and Gulf of St. Lawrence to facilitate ecosystem based management supported by evidence. The only currently available assessment was performed at the global scale using 19 drivers of anthropogenic stressors such as fisheries and pollution. While valuable, certain datasets inclu...