Christopher J W McClure

Christopher J W McClure
The Peregrine Fund

Ph.D.

About

147
Publications
40,939
Reads
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2,271
Citations
Citations since 2017
101 Research Items
1928 Citations
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20172018201920202021202220230100200300400500
20172018201920202021202220230100200300400500
20172018201920202021202220230100200300400500
Additional affiliations
October 2017 - present
The Peregrine Fund
Position
  • Managing Director
January 2014 - October 2017
The Peregrine Fund
Position
  • Managing Director
Description
  • Best job ever
March 2012 - January 2014
Boise State University
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Education
August 2007 - May 2012
Auburn University
Field of study
  • Biological Sciences
August 2001 - May 2005
University of Georgia
Field of study
  • Environmental Economics

Publications

Publications (147)
Article
Full-text available
Many authors have suggested that the negative effects of roads on animals are largely owing to traffic noise. Although suggestive, most past studies of the effects of road noise on wildlife were conducted in the presence of the other confounding effects of roads, such as visual disturbance, collisions and chemical pollution among others. We present...
Article
Despite common use, the efficacy of artificial breeding sites (e.g., nest boxes, bat houses, artificial burrows) as tools for monitoring and managing animals depends on the demography of target populations and availability of natural sites. Yet, the conditions enabling artificial breeding sites to be useful or informative have yet to be articulated...
Article
Full-text available
Raptors provide critical ecosystem services, yet there is currently no systematic, global synthesis of their conservation status or threats. We review the International Union for the Conservation of Nature's Red List to examine the conservation status, distributions, threats, and conservation recommendations for all 557 raptor species. We further a...
Article
There are currently four world bird lists referenced by different stakeholders including governments, academic journals, museums and citizen scientists. Consolidation of these lists is a conservation and research priority. In reconciling lists, care must be taken to ensure agreement in taxonomic concepts—the actual groups of individual organisms ci...
Article
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Most raptor populations are declining and nearly a fifth are threatened with extinction; thus there is a need to increase collaboration to ensure efficient and effective research, management, and conservation. Here, we introduce the Global Raptor Impact Network (GRIN; www.globalraptors.org), a tool to enhance collaboration and conservation impact o...
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Nest boxes are often used to monitor animals, and it is common practice to relocate nest boxes from unproductive sites into presumably better habitat. This relocation of nest boxes means that a given nest box program progressively monitors better sites over time. Ecological theory holds that occupancy and reproduction should generally increase with...
Article
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Conservationists often face tradeoffs. We present a tradeoff that we recently faced involving nest management of the endangered Puerto Rican Sharp-shinned Hawk (Accipiter striatus venator). Given our logistical constraints, we determined we were able to either continue our ongoing efforts to induce laying of a second clutch (hereafter, double clutc...
Article
Wind power is an expanding source of renewable energy. However, there are ecological challenges related to wind energy generation, including collisions of wildlife with turbines. Lack of rigor, and variation in study design, together limit efforts to understand the broad-scale effects of wind power infrastructure on wildlife populations. It is not...
Article
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Raptors are emblematic of the global biodiversity crisis because one out of five species are threatened with extinction and over half have declining populations due to human threats. Yet our understanding of where these “threats” impact raptor species is limited across terrestrial Earth. This is concerning because raptors, as apex predators, are cr...
Article
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Light and noise often act as pollutants, but can also be used as tools for managing wildlife (e.g., sensory deterrents). Given that raptors are among the most threatened groups of birds, we expected there to be a moderate amount of applied research on their sensory ecology. We searched Web of Science and Google Scholar to quantify and classify the...
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1. Automated curtailment is potentially a powerful technique to reduce collision mortality of wildlife with wind turbines. Previously, we used a before-after-control-impact framework to demonstrate that eagle fatalities declined after automated curtailment was implemented with the IdentiFlight system at a wind power facility in Wyoming, USA. We rec...
Article
Raptors are of global conservation concern and thus country-level assessments of their status are needed. We review studies and conservation databases to determine priorities for raptor conservation within the USA and Canada. We specifically examine databases compiled by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN), BirdLife Intern...
Article
We examined long-term demography of an endangered subspecies, the Northern Aplomado Falcon (Falco femoralis septentrionalis), in South Texas, USA. The population has been managed and monitored since reintroductions began in 1993. Data spanning 1993–2018 enabled us to build an integrated population model (IPM) and a Cormack-Jolly-Seber model to esti...
Article
Climate change is expected to have a profound impact on species distributions, contracting suitable climate space. Biodiversity areas are important to mitigate these negative effects but are static by design and thus do not account for future projections of species distributions. The Harpy Eagle Harpia harpyja has a broad range across lowland Neotr...
Article
Accurately demarcating distributions of biological taxa has long been at the core of ecology. Yet our understanding of the factors defining species range limits is incomplete, especially for tropical species in the Global South. Human-driven threats to the survival of many taxa are increasing, particularly habitat loss and climate change. Identifyi...
Preprint
Full-text available
Quantifying home range size and habitat resource selection are important elements in wildlife ecology and are useful for informing conservation action. Many home range estimators and resource selection functions are currently in use. However, both methods are fraught with analytical issues inherent within autocorrelated movement data from irregular...
Article
Operators of wind power facilities can mitigate wildlife mortality by slowing or stopping wind turbines (hereafter “curtail”) when birds are at increased risk of collision. Some facility operators curtail when individual birds have flight characteristics (e.g. altitude, distance, or relative bearing of a bird’s flight path) that exceed some thresho...
Article
Quantifying habitat use is important for understanding how animals meet their requirements for survival and provides information for conservation planning. Currently, assessments of range-wide habitat use that delimit species distributions are incomplete for many taxa. The Harpy Eagle (Harpia harpyja) is a raptor of conservation concern, widely dis...
Article
Full-text available
Traffic noise is one of the leading causes of reductions in animal abundances near roads. Acoustic masking of conspecific signals and adventitious cues is one mechanism that likely causes animals to abandon loud areas. However, masking effects can be difficult to document in situ and the effects of infrequent noise events may be impractical to stud...
Preprint
Full-text available
Knowledge gaps regarding distribution, habitat associations, and population size for rare and threatened range-restricted taxa leads to uncertainty in directing conservation action. Quantifying range metrics and species-habitat associations using Species Distribution Models (SDMs) with remote sensing habitat data can overcome these setbacks by esta...
Preprint
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A current biogeographic paradigm states that climate regulates species distributions at continental scales and that biotic interactions are undetectable at coarse-grain extents. However, recent advances in spatial modelling show that incorporating food resource distributions are important for improving model predictions at large distribution scales...
Article
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Optimal reproductive performance occurs when birds time reproduction to coincide with peak food availability. Deviation from optimal timing, or mismatch, can affect productivity, though birds may mediate some mismatch effects by altering their incubation behavior. We studied the consequences of nesting timing (i.e., clutch initiation relative to an...
Preprint
Full-text available
Quantifying resource partitioning between co-occurring species has important ecological and evolutionary implications. Yet, few studies compare resource overlap in both geographic and environmental space. We test whether the habitat requirements of two closely related Neotropical forest eagles, the crested eagle (Morphnus guianensis) and harpy eagl...
Article
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Scoping reviews, in which the literature on a given topic is systematically collated and summarized, aid literature searches and highlight knowledge gaps on a given topic, thus hastening scientific progress and informing conservation efforts. Because much research and conservation is targeted at the species level, ornithology and bird conservation...
Preprint
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Many range-restricted taxa are currently experiencing population declines yet lack fundamental information regarding distribution and population size. Establishing baseline estimates for both these key biological parameters is however critical for directing conservation planning for at-risk range-restricted species. The International Union for the...
Preprint
Climate-driven advances in spring can result in phenological mismatch between brood rearing and prey availability and consequently cause decreased productivity in birds. How consequences of mismatch vary across species’ ranges, and how individual behavior can mitigate mismatch effects is less studied. We quantified the relationship between phenolog...
Article
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Due to an abundance and diversity of vultures, Nepal is one of the most important countries for vulture conservation. Within Nepal, the Pokhara Valley is especially significant. We examine the distribution of vultures within the Pokhara Valley by conducting counts at 11 potential feeding or roosting sites using point count method. We further survey...
Article
The Himalayan Griffon (Gyps himalayensis) is listed as near threatened and its populations are poorly monitored. During late May and early June of 2013, 2014, and 2016, we resurveyed transects that were originally sampled 2002–2006. These transects were within the Annapurna region of Nepal. From 2010 through 2020, we also monitored a breeding colon...
Article
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American Kestrels (Falco sparverius) are declining across much of North America, yet the initial timing of the population decrease is unclear. In an attempt to elucidate when kestrel declines began, we examined historical descriptions of abundance within the northeastern United States. Within The Peregrine Fund's research library, we found 54 descr...
Article
Red-legged Seriemas (Cariama cristata) and Black-legged Seriemas (Chunga burmeisteri) are two exclusively South American species that inhabit open and sparsely forested areas. Seriemas have been recently included with the raptors based on ecological and evolutionary evidence. Viewing seriemas as raptors is nontraditional and might be controversial....
Article
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Background: Examination into the origin of SARS-CoV-2 has shed further light on opportunities for broader zoonotic pathogen transmission stemming from the trade in living wildlife and animal parts, and in associated practices. In certain parts of the world (e.g., Africa), various bird species are illegally captured for both subsistence and non-subs...
Article
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Habitat selection studies are designed to generate predictions of species distributions or inference regarding general habitat associations and individual variation in habitat use. Such studies frequently involve either individually indexed locations gathered across limited spatial extents and analyzed using resource selection functions (RSFs) or s...
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The Himalayan Griffon (Gyps himalayensis), is a globally near threatened vulture species that nests in the cliffs of mid hills and Himalayas of Nepal. We studied the Himnalayan Griffon breeding population and productivity on its prominent nesting sites at Khodpe in Baitatdi district, Nepal from 2010 to 2020. In 2012, this district was declared free...
Article
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Energy infrastructure, particularly for wind power, is rapidly expanding in Africa, creating the potential for conflict with at-risk wildlife populations. Raptor populations are especially susceptible to negative impacts of fatalities from wind energy because individuals tend to be long-lived and reproduce slowly. A major determinant of risk of col...
Article
Full-text available
Roads are a ubiquitous source of noise pollution. Several recent reviews highlight the ecological and evolutionary consequences of anthropogenic noise, but do not specifically focus on roads. I leverage a prior systematic mapping effort to examine patterns in 183 studies of road noise on terrestrial plants and animals. Birds were the most studied t...
Article
Full-text available
One Health brings the powerful interrelationship between human and wildlife health together with ecosystem health. The initial concept of One Health was formulated decades ago and focused on disease transfer from wildlife to human populations. More recently, the concept has been used to associate resilience to disease with the health of the ecosyst...
Preprint
Full-text available
Accurately demarcating species distributions has long been at the core of ecology. Yet our understanding of the factors limiting species range limits is incomplete, especially for tropical species in the Global South. Human-driven threats to the survival of many taxa are increasing, particularly habitat loss and climate change. Identifying distribu...
Article
Full-text available
One Health brings the powerful interrelationship between human and wildlife health together with ecosystem health. The initial concept of One Health was formulated decades ago and focused on disease transfer from wildlife to human populations. More recently, the concept has been used to associate resilience to disease with the health of the ecosyst...
Article
Despite efforts to recover the California Condor (Gymnogyps californianus) in the past 30 yr, the species is still Critically Endangered due in part to dependence on field management and captive breeding. Captive breeding focuses not only on the quantity of young produced every year, but also on the quality of these birds, to ensure their future su...
Preprint
Full-text available
Quantifying habitat use is important for understanding how animals meet their requirements for survival and provides useful information for conservation planning. Currently, assessments of range-wide habitat use that delimit species distributions are incomplete for many taxa. The harpy eagle ( Harpia harpyja ) is a raptor of conservation concern, w...
Article
Full-text available
There is increasing pressure on wind energy facilities to manage or mitigate for wildlife collisions. However, little information exists regarding spatial and temporal variation in collision rates, meaning that mitigation is most often a blanket prescription. To address this knowledge gap, we evaluated variation among turbines and months in an aspe...
Article
Full-text available
Indian Vultures ( Gyps indicus ) are critically endangered, yet are poorly monitored. We analyze counts of breeding pairs of Indian Vultures in Central India, specifically the eastern portions of the Indian states of Rajasthan and Madhya Pradesh over a period of 10 years and reveal the populations were on differing trajectories from 2007 to 2016. T...
Article
Full-text available
Protected natural areas are not free from noise, especially noise generated by traffic within park boundaries. Natural soundscapes are important for maintaining community structure, providing positive visitor experiences, and increasing visitor support for management actions that reduce impacts on natural resources. To test experimental quieting as...
Article
Full-text available
Identifying population genetic structure is useful for inferring evolutionary process and comparing the resulting structure with subspecies boundaries can aid in species management. The American Kestrel (Falco sparverius) is a widespread and highly diverse species with 17 total subspecies, only 2 of which are found north of U.S./Mexico border (F. s...
Article
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Research is underway around the world to examine how a wide range of animal species have responded to reduced levels of human activity during the COVID-19 pandemic. In this perspective article, we argue that raptors are particularly well-suited for investigating potential ‘anthropause’ effects, and that the resulting insights will provide much-need...
Article
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Citizen science programs can be powerful drivers of knowledge and scientific understanding and, in recent decades, they have become increasingly popular. Conducting successful research with the aid of citizen scientists often rests on the efficacy of a program’s outreach strategies. Program evaluation is increasingly recognized as a critical practi...
Article
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Collision‐caused fatalities of animals at wind power facilities create a ‘green versus green’ conflict between wildlife conservation and renewable energy. These fatalities can be mitigated via informed curtailment whereby turbines are slowed or stopped when wildlife are considered at increased risk of collision. Automated monitoring systems could i...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding species-environment relationships is key to defining the spatial structure of species distributions and develop effective conservation plans. However, for many species, this baseline information does not exist. With reliable presence data, spatial models that predict geographic ranges and identify environmental processes regulating di...
Article
Examination of population trends for raptors is a research priority, especially given recent concern for their conservation status. Road counts—in which raptors are counted from a motorized vehicle moving along the ground—might be an effective method to expand the monitoring of raptor populations and estimation of trends. Here, we review past metho...
Article
Globally, evaluation of population trends is the most pressing research need for many species of conservation concern. Road counts for birds of prey are useful for monitoring long‐term population trends and examining year‐to‐year variations in abundance. We examined data from 2,155 road surveys conducted from 2001–2018 by community scientists who r...
Article
Demographic differences between stable and declining populations can lend insight into drivers of population decline. The American Kestrel (Falco sparverius) is a widespread and often‐studied falcon, yet its demography is poorly understood and causes of observed population declines across much of North America remain unknown. Using integrated popul...
Article
Full-text available
Birds, especially raptors, play important roles in ecosystems. We examine the International Union for the Conservation of Nature’s (IUCN) Red List to determine which orders of birds have proportionally more or fewer species listed as threatened or declining compared to the Class-wide average. We further examine whether raptors are more threatened o...
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Full-text available
Expansion of anthropogenic noise and night lighting across our planet1,2 is of increasing conservation concern3–6. Despite growing knowledge of physiological and behavioural responses to these stimuli from single-species and local-scale studies, whether these pollutants affect fitness is less clear, as is how and why species vary in their sensitivi...
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1. Burgeoning urbanization, development and human activities have led to reduced opportunities for nature experience in quiet acoustic environments. Increasing noise affects both humans and wildlife alike. 2. We experimentally altered human-caused sound levels in a paired study using in-formational signs that encouraged quiet behaviours in week-on,...
Article
The 'Endangered' Cape Vulture Gyps coprotheres has been monitored across its range for decades through disparate studies varying in geographical scope and length. Yet, no long-term, range-wide survey exists for the species. Coordinated monitoring across the range of the Cape Vulture would be logistically challenging but provide a holistic view of p...
Article
Full-text available
Forest canopies contribute significantly to global forest biodiversity and ecosystem functioning, yet are declining and understudied. One reason for a knowledge gap is that accessing forest canopies can be difficult and dangerous. Thus, lack of relevant canopy access skills may compromise knowledge gain and personal safety. We assessed skill levels...