Christopher J. Lively

Christopher J. Lively
Memorial University of Newfoundland · Department of Psychology

BSc., BA., MSc.

About

12
Publications
1,120
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27
Citations
Introduction
Christopher J. Lively is a PhD student at the Department of Psychology, Memorial University of Newfoundland. Christopher's research is primarily focused in Forensic Psychology and Experimental Psychology, with particular interest in alibis, investigative interviewing, questioning practices in the justice system, and legal decision making.

Publications

Publications (12)
Article
Full-text available
We examined the extent to which presenting youth interrogation rights using different combinations of three multimedia elements (Animation, Audio, and Caption) improved comprehension. A 2 (Animation: Present, Absent) × 2 (Audio: Present, Absent) × 2 (Caption: Present, Absent) between-participants design was employed using samples of adults (Experim...
Article
Listening to music aids regulation of emotional arousal and valence (positive versus negative). Anxiety sensitivity (AS; fear of arousal-related sensations) increases risk for emotion dysregulation and associated coping behaviors like substance use and exercise avoidance. The relationship between AS and music listening, however, has received very l...
Article
The effect of the suspect-corroborator relationship and number of corroborators on alibi assessments was examined across two experiments. In both experiments, we explored the effect of relationship type and number of corroborators on believability, likelihood of guilt, and decision to retain the suspect as the primary suspect; we increased the soci...
Article
Full-text available
The questioning practices of Canadian lawyers were examined. Courtroom examinations (N = 91) were coded for the type of utterance, the assumed purpose of the utterance, and the length of utterance. Results showed that approximately one-fifth of all utterances were classified as productive for gathering reliable information (i.e. open-ended, probing...
Poster
Full-text available
Questioning practices of judges were analyzed. Most frequently asked questions to witnesses were clarification and closed yes/no. Per curium (vs. direct and cross) examinations contained significantly more closed yes/no questions, and significantly more multiple questions (vs. direct). Open-ended questions generated the longest responses from witne...
Article
The relative impact of five alibi components on the assessment of alibi veracity was investigated using a policy-capturing methodology. Participants (N = 115) were instructed to assume the role of a homicide investigator and evaluate 32 alibis that varied on five dichotomous variables: Salaciousness; Legality; Change in Details; Superfluous Details...

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