Christopher E. Kelly

Christopher E. Kelly
Saint Joseph's University (PA, USA) · Department of Sociology

PhD

About

28
Publications
50,914
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588
Citations
Citations since 2017
13 Research Items
465 Citations
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2017201820192020202120222023020406080100

Publications

Publications (28)
Article
Full-text available
This archival study was the first in Sweden, and the first outside of the US and the UK, to apply the (Kelly et al., Psychology, Public Policy, and Law, 9, 165-178, 2013) taxonomy of interrogation methods framework to repeated police interrogations of adult suspects in high-stakes crimes. Audio/video recordings (N = 19) were collected from the Swed...
Article
Full-text available
Background Low-stakes crimes related to alcohol and/or drugs are common around the world, but research is lacking on police–suspect interactions of such crimes. A large proportion of these suspects are intoxicated during interrogations, and many may have substance use disorder, making them potentially vulnerable to interrogative pressure.Methods To...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Low-stakes crimes related to alcohol and/or drugs are common around the world, but research is lacking on police–suspect interactions of such crimes. A large proportion of these suspects are intoxicated during interrogations, and many may have substance use disorder, making them potentially vulnerable to interrogative pressure. Methods...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Background: Low-stakes crimes related to drugs and/or alcohol are common around the world, but research is lacking on police-suspect interactions during interrogations of such crimes. A large proportion of these suspects have substance use disorder, and many are intoxicated during interrogation, making them potentially vulnerable to interrogative p...
Article
Full-text available
Objectives Recent writing and research on interrogation has highlighted the potential importance of the physical context in which the interview takes place. Whereas manuals and self-reports from police investigators indicate how they can leverage the space to maximize control over subjects, arguments for non-coercive manipulation of the room contex...
Article
Full-text available
The majority of research on investigative interviewing has been on police attempting to solve a crime by obtaining a confession or gathering information, and comparatively fewer studies have examined interviewing at points “downstream” in the process, such as in the courts or correctional system. Furthermore, the focus of the research has been to m...
Article
Investigative interviewing can be thought of as the interaction between two clusters of factors: questions and techniques. Analyses of question types and interview techniques are often treated discretely, where one is the focal point at the expense of the other, or they are conceptually indistinguishable. To explore these relationships further, the...
Chapter
Full-text available
The critical need for interviewing and interrogation procedures to be grounded in evidence-based approaches is underscored by the tragedy of documented false confession cases, the revival of a national debate in the United States over the utility of torture, and the critical role that human intelligence plays in both law enforcement and intelligenc...
Article
This study contributes to the substance abuse treatment literature by examining recidivism across treatment groups, the level of aggregation between the individual and the program. The sample consisted of 618 drug-involved offenders who participated in 12 different treatment groups within a single prison. Reincarceration significantly varied across...
Article
Full-text available
Researchers have been interested in police investigations for a half-century or more. In the academic literature, however, there is virtually no examination of analogous investigation units and investigators that operate exclusively in jails, prisons, or detention centers, despite these units being in nearly all large local, state, and federal faci...
Article
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The concept of minimization has been a focal point of research on police interrogations in part because of its widespread use and endorsement in interrogation training. Minimization, however, refers to a wide range of specific techniques, and research into it has tended to focus almost exclusively on suspect admissions at the expense of other suspe...
Article
Full-text available
Suspect interviewing and interrogation practices have been studied in many different countries, including those in North America, Europe, Asia, and Australia. These studies have produced useful and interesting findings, while also leaving an opening for future inquiry. Specifically, previous research has noted that we might expect interrogation and...
Article
Research has examined responses to substance abuse treatment among criminal justice populations primarily through client self-assessments, and comparatively fewer studies have focused on clinician ratings of client progress. Recently, Blasko and Hiller examined counselor ratings and their association with reincarceration but found no relationship b...
Article
Full-text available
Building on a substantial body of literature examining interrogation methods employed by police investigators and their relationship to suspect behaviors, we analyzed a sample of audio and video interrogation recordings of individuals suspected of serious violent crimes. Existing survey research has focused on the tactics reportedly used, at what r...
Article
Background: With notable exceptions, few studies have looked critically at the role and effects of factors other than individual or programmatic differences that contribute to the climate within substance abuse treatment programs. De Leon's work on the therapeutic community, however, indicates that factors beyond the individual and program can con...
Article
Full-text available
The last two decades of research on interrogation were spurred, in large part, by the specter of false confessions and the resulting miscarriages of justice. More recently, interest in the topic has been fueled by the need for developing evidence-based methods that improve the collection of diagnostic confession evidence and accurate intelligence f...
Article
The Capital Jury Project (CJP) was conducted by a consortium of scholars who collected extensive interview data from nearly 1,200 jurors serving in 353 death-penalty trials in 14 states over a number of years. It represents a landmark research initiative and one of the most comprehensive and systematic efforts ever made to study death-penalty decis...
Chapter
Full-text available
In this chapter, the authors frame their review of American interrogation practices with a brief history of how control-based, accusatorial methods became the hallmark of law enforcement interrogation in the United States. The most popular training manuals and courses, such as the Kinesic Interview, the Reid Technique, and Wicklander-Zulawski and A...
Article
Full-text available
The current study sought to examine the 6 domains conceptualized in a recent taxonomy of interrogation methods (Kelly, Miller, Redlich, & Kleinman, 2013): rapport and relationship building, context manipulation, emotion provocation, confrontation/competition, collaboration, and presentation of evidence. In this article, the domains are first situat...
Article
Full-text available
A great deal of research in the past two decades has been devoted to interrogation and interviewing techniques. This study contributes to the existing literature using an online survey to examine the frequency of use and perceived effectiveness of interrogation methods for up to 152 military and federal-level interrogators from the USA. We focus on...
Article
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The Texas death penalty statute originally approved by the United States Supreme Court in Jurek v. Texas (1976) was legislatively amended as a result of the Court’s decision in Penry v. Lynaugh (1989). The changes were intended to focus on increasing jurors’ ability to give mitigating effect to evidence in sentencing. Using data from the Capital Ju...
Chapter
Full-text available
Trevaskes S (2010) The shifting sands of punishment in the era of 'harmonious society'. Law Policy 32:332–361 Wang ZF (1989) (ed) Theory and practice of comprehensive management of public order in China. Masses Press, Beijing (in Chinese) Welsh B, Hoshi A (2002) Communities and crime prevention. In: Sherman L, Farrington DP, Welsh BC, MacKenzie DL...
Article
Full-text available
With a few notable exceptions, the research on interrogation, suspect interviewing, and intelligence collection has been predominantly focused on either broad categories of their methods (e.g., information gathering vs. accusatorial models) or very specific techniques (e.g., using open-ended questions, appealing to the source's conscience). The bro...
Article
Full-text available
The current investigation extends previous work on citizens' perceptions of police performance. It examines origins of between-community differences in concerned citizens' judgements that police are responding sufficiently to a local social problem. The problem is local unsupervised teen groups, a key indicator for both the revised systemic social...
Article
Full-text available
The Level of Service Inventory—Revised (LSI-R) has been validated for a variety of criminal justice populations, although one large segment for which the instrument has not been validated is drug-involved offenders. With the increasing implementation of the LSI-R across correctional jurisdictions in the United States and internationally, and with a...

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