Christopher G. Hudson

Christopher G. Hudson
Salem State University · School of Social Work

Ph.D.

About

67
Publications
7,786
Reads
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964
Citations
Additional affiliations
September 1987 - present
Salem State University
Position
  • Professor (Full)

Publications

Publications (67)
Article
Full-text available
The ideal balanced mental health service system presupposes that planners can determine the need for various required services. The history of deinstitutionalization has shown that one of the most difficult such determinations involves the number of needed psychiatric beds for various localities. Historically, such assessments have been made on the...
Article
In its extended history, social progress has become a metanarrative of the western world, one that has been both extolled and more recently pervasively dismissed. This review examines this history, including efforts to resurrect the concept, both through global research and within social work. Specifically, the advancement of social progress is inc...
Article
Full-text available
This study examines the initial impact of a broadly participatory planning process in the Czech Republic during 2016–2017, aimed at both reducing inpatient care and expanding community mental health systems, on policy and programmatic decision making. A central focus of the study involves the trade-offs between and efforts to integrate shared decis...
Article
Full-text available
Purpose This study has the objective of assessing the psychiatric rehospitalization experience of a large cohort of persons with schizophrenia and modeling the effects of personal and systemic conditions on rehospitalization risk. Methods The study employs a secondary analysis of US data from Massachusetts’ casemix database of all patients dischar...
Article
Full-text available
Geographic isolation has long been hypothesized to have a role in the origins and development of mental disabilities. A considerable body of research has established such a correlation. However, study designs have limited researchers' ability to establish a causal connection and rule out rival hypotheses. This study, therefore, aims to assess the s...
Article
This study tests several hypotheses regarding the impact of deinstitutionalization of inpatient care on levels of psychiatric disability. It employs a secondary analysis of existing datasets from the World Health Organization's mental health program, the Global Burden of Disease study, as well as supplemental datasets on the national environments e...
Article
Proliferation in the use of the terminology around behavioral mental health suggests, on one hand, an emerging field of service that integrates psychiatric, substance abuse, and related services. On the other hand, this development also raises questions about the coherence of this approach. This review explores the history, definitional issues, cur...
Article
Deinstitutionalization has been ongoing since the 1950s and is a trend that has been molded by diverse sociocultural conditions and competing ideologies. Key questions from the literature include its extent and the drivers motivating it, political and financial dimensions, and consequences in such domains as homelessness, nursing home care, and the...
Article
The search for a unified conceptual framework for social work has floundered as the profession has struggled with general systems theory and, most recently, the eco-systems perspective. Social work has also ignored chaos or complex systems theory, which, as the successor to general systems theory, some believe is the third major scientific revoluti...
Conference Paper
BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE. Considerable research on mental health disparities has extensively documented dramatic differentials in serious mental illness based on SES, age, ethnicity, and various other predictors. When these are included in multivariate models, the use of statistical controls have revealed complex, and sometimes counter-intuitive inte...
Article
Full-text available
This paper critically reviews the expanding literature on applications of sustainability to healthcare policy and planning. It argues that the concept has been overgeneralized and has become a buzzword masking disparate agendas. It ignores the insights of the newest generation of systems theory on complex systems on the ubiquity of far-from-equilib...
Article
Full-text available
This paper critically reviews the expanding literature on applications of sustainability to healthcare policy and planning. It argues that the concept has been overgeneralized and has become a buzzword masking disparate agendas. It ignores the insights of the newest generation of systems theory on complex systems on the ubiquity of far-from-equilib...
Article
Full-text available
Purpose: This study aims to estimate, apply, and validate a model of the risk of serious mental illness (SMI) in local service areas throughout New Zealand. Methods: The study employs a secondary analysis of data from the Te Rau Hinengaro Mental Health Survey of 12,992 adults aged 16 years and over from the household population. It uses small ar...
Article
This article reviews recent theory and research on geographic disparities in mental health and their implications for social work. It focuses on work emerging from the fields of mental health geography, psychiatric epidemiology, and social work, arguing that a wide range of spatial disparities in mental health are important to understand but that o...
Article
Full-text available
Epidemiological surveys have revealed dramatic declines in the prevalence of serious mental illness (SMI) as adults age. Analyses of these datasets have not determined whether this is attributable, on one hand, to declining incidence, shorter duration of condition, and lesser severity with age, or on the other hand, confounding variables and method...
Conference Paper
Problem: During last decade, the World Health Organization has coordinated a program of 28 national mental health surveys, making possible national epidemiological assessments of mental illness and services using state-of-the-art measurement and sampling protocols. Although these surveys have sufficient sample sizes to determine national prevalence...
Article
An emerging body of research in the field of international mental health, in part stimulated by the World Mental Health Survey Initiative, has made only limited progress in understanding variations in levels of development in mental health services across nations. However, the World Health Organization's recent initiatives involving the Assessment...
Article
Full-text available
This study compares the use of acute psychiatric hospitalization; selected outcomes, including rehospitalization; as well as costs associated with the health maintenance organization (HMO), carve-out, and fee-for-service models as implemented in the Massachusetts Medicaid program between FY1994 and FY2000. This is a longitudinal analysis that prima...
Article
This study models geographic variations in the US in lifetime occurrence of homelessness, length of homeless experience, and point-in-time estimates based on socioeconomic, demographic, and disability indicators, among 13,931 respondents in the National Comorbidity Replication and the National Latino Asian American surveys. It uses a small area est...
Article
This study addresses an ongoing problem in mental health needs assessment. This involves estimating the prevalence of an identified problem, specifically serious mental illness (SMI), for local areas in a reliable, valid, and cost-effective manner. The aim of the study is the application and testing of a recently introduced methodology from the fie...
Article
Full-text available
In this article the author reviews problems in the implementation of evidence‐based practices (EBP) and concludes that these derive not only from numerous practical concerns, but also from fundamental epistemological issues. These include an antiquated understanding of the scientific method, involving types of naive inductivism and rationalism. The...
Article
Full-text available
Numerous studies have provided substantial evidence showing that the provision of psychiatric services offsets or reduces the subsequent provision of medical services. Yet, this evidence has not been conclusive, and in recent years it has been theorized that the offset effect may no longer be relevant because other cost-containment strategies, such...
Article
The following reviews the promises and limitations for social work of self-organization theory, an integral part of the emerging field of complex systems. Self-organization refers to the capacity of many systems to spontaneously develop novel forms of organization with little external interference. The primary focus of the review involves what the...
Article
Full-text available
This study identifies long-term patterns of patient utilization in acute hospitals in Massachusetts based on the 47,787 psychiatric patients. Cluster analyses are used to identify six patterns of hospitalization based on the number and length of episodes, variety of institutions, length of stay, and time between stays. The study demonstrates that w...
Article
Full-text available
This study tests several hypotheses about the underlying causal structure of the inverse correlation between socioeconomic status (SES) and mental illness. It does this through the analysis of a longitudinal statewide database on acute psychiatric hospitalization in Massachusetts for the fiscal years 1994-2000 as well as supplemental census data. T...
Article
Full-text available
This report presents the preliminary results of a longitudinal study of acute psychiatric hospitalization in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts for fiscal years 1994 to 2000. The study was a secondary analysis of data obtained through the Commonwealth's mandated case-mix reporting system, covering 42 acute psychiatric facilities and 119,284 patients...
Article
Full-text available
This article reviews the impact of evolutionary thought on social change theory. It argues that social Darwinist assumptions underlie many of the efforts to understand social change. Partly for this reason, social change theory has languished in recent years. Recently, however, nonequilibrium theories have generated a new interest in the notion of...
Article
Full-text available
The search for a unified conceptual framework for social work has floundered as the profession has struggled with general systems theory and, most recently, the eco-systems perspective. Social work has also ignored chaos or complex systems theory, which, as the successor to general systems theory, some believe is the third major scientific revoluti...
Article
This article overviews the results from a test of a model of homeless populations throughout the 3,141 counties of the United States. The data were extracted from the 1990 Census, a Census Bureau survey of its enumerators at completion of the census, and other governmental sources. The model was tested using the generally weighted least squares alg...
Article
This article reviews research pertinent to mental health services under several U.S. health care reform proposals. Issues examined include the redistributional impact of the inclusion of outpatient mental health benefits, optimal benefit packages, and findings that mental health services lower medical utilization costs. It is argued that extending...
Article
Full-text available
This article, which examines epidemiological and policy correlates of homeless populations in 351 Massachusetts towns and cities, is based on an analysis of data from the 1990 U.S. census. It reviews the reliability of the most recent census data, reports findings on the distribution and characteristics of homeless persons in Massachusetts, and pre...
Article
Full-text available
State mental health authorities have progressively upgraded their planning capabilities during the 1980s. The extent these authorities use rational planning methods was found to be positively associated with the rated quality of their community mental health system, particularly in states with greater deinstitutionalization and privatization of com...
Article
Full-text available
The study develops and tests a path model of the performance of state community mental health systems. It reports a secondary analysis of data from several recently completed studies. The final model, which accounts for over half of the variation in rated performance, replicates earlier findings, which reveal a minimal role for spending, and identi...
Article
This article reviews recent advances in knowledge regarding the diagnosis and evaluation of treatments for alcoholism. These include changes in the definition and measurement of alcoholism, controlled drinking versus abstinence as treatment goals, the efficacy of various treatments, and the growing evidence concerning the salience of environmental...
Article
A central argument for block grants is that they improve decision making through the decentralization of control of social programs to state governments. This study investigates whether this has been the case through the application of the theoretical work of Janis and Mann to case studies of the implementation of the ADAMHA block grant in Arkansas...
Article
Investigated changes in state mental health spending under the Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Mental Health (ADAMHA) block grant. Budgetary data for 1977–1983 indicate that the block grant had a stimulative effect on state mental health spending, particularly on community care. Community mental health centers faced major cutbacks as states shifted their...

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Project (1)
Project
The aim of the proposed project is to identify best practices for decision making involving resource allocation for major service modalities in mental health systems in a range of socio-cultural environments. A secondary aim – for supporting such practices – is the estimation of a statistical model of selected outcomes of alternative mixes of services in national mental health systems.