Christopher J. Greyson-Gaito

Christopher J. Greyson-Gaito
University of Guelph | UOGuelph · Department of Integrative Biology

Master of Science

About

15
Publications
964
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41
Citations
Introduction
I see myself as interdisciniplinary and am interested in the intersection of ecology with evolution, politics, and economics. My main research tool is mathematical modelling, but I also collaborate with empiricists regularly. For my PhD, I am examining the interactions of ecological processes across scales in a variety of systems. One part of my PhD will examine how the stabilization of farming yields can translate into instability in farming profits. Another part of my PhD will examine the dynamics of resident gut microbial communities (microbiomes).
Additional affiliations
January 2016 - December 2017
University of Guelph
Position
  • PhD Student
January 2016 - December 2017
University of Guelph
Position
  • Master's Student

Publications

Publications (15)
Article
Eastern spruce budworm, Choristoneura fumiferana Clemens (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), is a major pest of eastern North American forests. Outbreaks of spruce budworm occur every 30–40 years, causing high tree mortality. Researchers have established that higher proportions of hardwood trees within stands (higher hardwood content) may reduce the defoli...
Preprint
Full-text available
Sudden population disappearances are a possibility in natural systems. Human-caused reddening of noise - increasing the autocorrelation of noise - may make sudden population disappearances more likely because red noise can enlarge the period and magnitude of perturbations, potentially overwhelming species' natural compensatory responses and pushing...
Article
The world is astoundingly variable, and organisms – from individuals to whole communities – must respond to variability to survive. One example of nature’s variability is the fluctuations in populations of spruce budworm, Choristoneura fumiferana Clemens (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), which cycle every 35 years. In this study, we examined how a parasi...
Preprint
Full-text available
A major pest of eastern North American forests is spruce budworm, Choristoneura fumiferana Clemens (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), which outbreaks every 30–40 years and causes large scale tree mortality. Researchers have established that hardwood content reduces the defoliation and mortality of balsam fir and spruces during spruce budworm outbreaks. On...
Chapter
Uncovering the fundamental properties of ecological stability is a central question in theoretical biology since its inception at the turn of the century. Here, motivated by simple modular theory (e.g., population models to few species models), we review the role of interactions strength and lags on dynamics and stability. Specifically, we argue th...
Article
Full-text available
The loss of biodiversity is altering the structure of ecological networks; however, we are currently in a poor position to predict how these altered communities will affect the evolution of remaining populations. Theory on fitness landscapes provides a framework for predicting how selection alters the evolutionary trajectory and adaptive potential...
Article
Gut microbial communities (microbiomes) profoundly shape the ecology and evolution of multicellular life. Interactions between host and microbiome appear to be reciprocal, and ecological theory is now being applied to better understand how hosts and their microbiome influence each other. However, some ecological processes that underlie reciprocal h...
Article
Full-text available
Global change is simplifying the structure of ecological networks; however, we are currently in a poor position to predict how these simplified communities will affect the evolutionary potential of remaining populations. Theory on adaptive landscapes provides a framework for predicting how selection constrains phenotypic evolution, but often treats...
Article
Full-text available
One of the greatest challenges in contemporary ecology is to understand how the homogenization of biodiversity at all levels of organization and spatial scales will influence the assembly of communities and the functioning of ecosystems. Such homogenization can occur through the gain of non-native species and the loss of native species. Here, we sh...
Preprint
Resident gut microbial communities (microbiomes) have profound impacts on the ecology and evolution of multicellular life, shaping host physiology, behaviour, and community interactions. We are beginning to understand that ecological theories can be applied to the interactions between hosts and their microbiomes. However, the ecological processes t...
Preprint
Full-text available
The world is astoundingly variable, and individuals to whole communities must respond to variability to survive. One potent example of nature's variability is the massive fluctuations in spruce budworm (Choristoneura fumiferana Clemens) populations that occur over 35 years. We examined how the parasitoid community altered its parasitism of budworm...
Preprint
Full-text available
Global change is simplifying the structure of ecological networks; however, we are currently in a poor position to predict how these simplified communities will affect the evolutionary potential of remaining populations. Theory on adaptive landscapes provides a framework for predicting how selection constrains phenotypic evolution, but often treats...
Article
Movement between host plants during the growing season is a common behaviour among insect herbivores, although the mechanisms promoting these movements are poorly understood for many systems. Two possible reasons why insect herbivores relocate include compensating for host plant quantity and/or quality changes and the avoidance of natural enemies....
Data
In June 2013, we collected 60 caterpillars (of instars 4-7), that had been active for approximately seven days, and used net bags (made from polyester, with holes of about 1.3mm2) to contain each caterpillar on a single branch of 60 haphazardly chosen Arctic willow individuals. For half of these caterpillars (n = 30) we moved them every four days t...

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