Christopher Barakat

Christopher Barakat
The University of Tampa | UT · Department of Health Sciences and Human Performance

MS - Exercise and Nutritional Sciences, BSc - Athletic Training
Owner / Physique Coach @ Competitive Breed LLC. Educating and coaching at SchoolOfGainz.com

About

13
Publications
90,416
Reads
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102
Citations
Introduction
Christopher Barakat currently works at the Department of Health Sciences and Human Performance, The University of Tampa.
Additional affiliations
August 2016 - present
The University of Tampa
Position
  • Instructor
November 2015 - present
Competitive Breed LLC
Position
  • Owner
Description
  • Working with clients to optimize their training & nutritional approach with the primary intention of improving body composition and overall health. I specialize in coaching physique athletes (i.e. bodybuilding, figure, etc.), but work with a wide population range with different experience levels and goals. Additionally, I aim to educate a broader audience with my company's sub-brand, School of Gainz.
Education
January 2016 - May 2017
The University of Tampa
Field of study
  • Exercise & Nutritional Sciences
August 2012 - June 2015
Stony Brook University
Field of study
  • Athletic Training

Publications

Publications (13)
Article
Full-text available
Background: The purpose of this case study was to implement an evidence-based dietary approach to peaking for a bodybuilding competition and monitor its impact on body composition, muscle thickness (MT), intra-to-extra-cellular fluid shifts, subcutaneous thickness (ST), and hydration status. Secondarily, to document any adverse events of this peak...
Article
--[Correction: Table 2 updated to match text description of training program]-- The study examined the effects of adding a loaded stretch in the inter- set rest period (ISS) compared to traditional resistance training (TR) on muscular adaptations in resistance-trained males. Twenty-six subjects were randomly assigned into two groups (ISS: n=12; TR:...
Article
The study examined the effects of adding a loaded stretch in the inter- set rest period (ISS) compared to traditional resistance training (TR) on muscular adaptations in resistance-trained males. Twenty-six subjects were randomly assigned into two groups (ISS: n=12; TR: n=14) and underwent an 8-week training regimen. Subjects in ISS underwent an ad...
Article
Full-text available
Bodybuilding is a competitive endeavor where a combination of muscle size, symmetry, “conditioning” (low body fat levels), and stage presentation are judged. Success in bodybuilding requires that competitors achieve their peak physique during the day of competition. To this end, competitors have been reported to employ various peaking interventions...
Article
Full-text available
This study compared the effects of FAST and SLOW eccentric repetition tempo in a single exercise volume-matched intervention on muscle thickness (MT) and strength in resistance-trained men. Using a within- subject design, 13 subjects had each leg randomly assigned to SLOW (1-0-3) or FAST (1-0-1) repetition tempo. Subjects un- derwent an 8-week stre...
Article
Full-text available
Despite the lack of standardized terminology, building muscle and losing fat concomitantly has been referred to as body recomposition by practitioners. Although many suggest that this only occurs in untrained/novice and overweight/obese populations, there is a substantial amount of literature demonstrating this body recomposition phenomenon in resi...
Article
Full-text available
Physique athletes often incorporate aerobic exercise as part of their exercise program to increase caloric expenditure for the purposes of improving their body composition. One method used by some physique competitors is to perform aerobic exercise in the fasted state under the assumption that low glycogen levels after an overnight fast allow for g...
Article
Full-text available
This study investigated the effects of 12-SET, 18-SET, and 24-SET lower-body weekly sets on muscle strength and mass accretion. Thirty-five resistance-trained individuals (one repetition maximum [1RM] squat: body mass ratio [1RM: BM] 5 2.09) were randomly divided into 12-SET: n 5 13, 18-SET: n 5 12, and 24-SET: n 5 10. Subjects underwent an 8-week...
Article
Full-text available
There is a paucity of data on how manipulating joint angles during isolation exercises may impact overall session muscle activation and volume load in resistance-trained individuals. We investigated the acute effects of varying glenohumeral joint angle on the biceps brachii with a crossover repeated measure design with three di↵erent biceps curls....
Article
Full-text available
This study investigated the effects of advanced training techniques (ATT) on muscular responses and if performing a second training session would negatively affect the training stimulus. Eleven strength-trained males performed a traditional strength training session (TST) and four different ATT: pre-exhaustion A (PE-A), pre-exhaustion B (PE-B), for...
Article
Full-text available
This study investigated the effects of two different velocity-based training (VBT) regimens on muscular adaptations. Fifteen female college volleyball players were randomly assigned into either progressive velocity-based training (PVBT) or optimum training load (OTL). Both groups trained three times a week for seven weeks. PVBT performed a 4-week s...
Article
Full-text available
Auto-regulated exercise selection training regimen ABSTRACT: The purpose of this investigation was to compare the effects of auto-regulatory exercise selection (AES) vs. fixed exercise selection (FES) on muscular adaptations in strength-trained individuals. Seventeen males (Mean ± SD; age = 24 ± 5.45 years; height = 180.3 ± 7.54cm, lean body mass [...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
BACKGROUND: It is well excepted that exercise selection is an important variable in resistance training. Currently, there is a paucity of data comparing strength and hypertrophy gains when using distinct exercise selection methods. Furthermore, recent evidence suggests that auto-regulatory approaches may optimize strength training adaptations. Howe...

Projects

Projects (4)
Project
To see the chronic effects of various training techniques on muscular hypertrophic and strength adaptations in trained males.
Project
Previous literature has demonstrated a dose response relationship between volume load and muscle hypertrophy (1). Recently, in a meta-analysis Schoenfeld et.al,(2017) demonstrated that ten sets per week per muscle group is superior for muscle growth when compared to three and five sets(2). However, these researchers also pointed out that that there is limited data that has analyzed the effects of greater volume loads (i.e., greater than 10 sets per week). Additionally, strength trained individuals often report performing 15 to 30 sets per muscle group per week. Furthermore, it has been theorized that there may exist a threshold where additional volume loads provide no further benefit for muscle growth, however this threshold has yet to be identified. Therefore, the purpose of this investigation is to examine the effects of three different volume loads on muscle hypertrophy, strength in strength-trained males. After baseline testing, subjects will be randomly assigned into one of three groups, 12, 18, and 24 sets per week. Testing of all dependent variables will occur at week 0, and after 8 weeks of training. We hypothesize that 18 and 24 sets per week will elicit greater muscle growth than 12, and that 24 sets per week will provide no statistically significant benefit when compared to 18 sets per week
Project
To the best of our knowledge, no study has investigated the dose-response of volume of resistance exercises on muscular performance and recovery parameters in strength-trained individuals. Therefore, the current study will investigate how resistance trained males respond to different amounts of volume during resistance training sessions. Additionally, what would be the amount of training volume to produce less decrement in muscular performance and how long would it take for an individual to recover from different volume loads.