Christopher Angell

Christopher Angell
Earlham College · Biology

PhD

About

18
Publications
6,058
Reads
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66
Citations
Introduction
I am an evolutionary ecologist with a particular interest in the evolution of animal life histories. Visit my homepage at http://www.chris-angell.org
Additional affiliations
September 2016 - May 2021
University of Ottawa
Position
  • PhD Student
June 2014 - July 2014
University of Delaware
Position
  • Research Assistant
Description
  • Assisted Dr. Jonathan Cohen and doctoral student Corie Charpentier with a study of zooplankton chemical ecology and diel vertical migration.
May 2013 - August 2013
Earlham College
Position
  • Research Assistant
Description
  • Assisted Dr. John Iverson with his 30-year study of turtle populations, including demography, nesting behavior, and temperature-dependent sex determination.
Education
September 2016 - May 2021
University of Ottawa
Field of study
  • Biology
August 2011 - May 2015
Earlham College
Field of study
  • Biology

Publications

Publications (18)
Article
Full-text available
In many species, parental age at reproduction can influence offspring performance and lifespan, but the direction of these effects and the traits affected vary among studies. Data on parental age effects are still scarce in non-captive populations, especially insects, despite species such as fruit flies being models in laboratory-based aging resear...
Article
Full-text available
High-quality developmental environments often improve individual performance into adulthood, but allocating toward early-life traits, such as growth, development rate, and reproduction, may lead to trade-offs with late life performance. It is therefore uncertain how a rich developmental environment will affect the ageing process (senescence), parti...
Article
Full-text available
Competition for mates can be a major source of selection, not just on secondary sexual traits but across the genome. Mate competition strengthens selection on males via sexual selection, which typically favors healthy, vigorous individuals and, thus, all genetic variants that increase overall quality. However, recent studies suggest another major e...
Article
Full-text available
The epicuticular compounds (ECs) of insects serve both to waterproof the cuticle and, in many taxa, as pheromones that are important for various social interactions, including mate choice within populations. However, ECs have not been individually identified in many species and most studies of their role in mate choice have been performed in a labo...
Preprint
In many species, parental age at reproduction can influence offspring performance and lifespan, but the direction of these effects and the traits affected vary among studies. Data on parental age effects are still scarce in non-captive populations, especially insects, despite species such as fruit flies being models in laboratory-based aging resear...
Thesis
Full-text available
As most multicellular organisms age, they undergo senescence: a progressive physiological deterioration that leads to declines in survival, reproduction, and performance in late life. Although senescence was once thought to be a phenomenon peculiar to captive animals and humans, field data have demonstrated age-related performance declines in a var...
Article
Full-text available
High-quality developmental environments often improve individual performance into adulthood, but allocating toward early-life traits, such as growth, development rate, and reproduction, may lead to trade-offs with late life performance. It is therefore uncertain how a rich developmental environment will affect the ageing process (senescence), parti...
Article
Natural variation in the growth and development of Protopiophila litigata (Diptera: Piophilidae) developing in three moose (Artiodactyla: Cervidae) antlers–CORRIGENDUM - Christopher S. Angell, Olivia Cook
Preprint
The epicuticular compounds (ECs) of insects serve both to waterproof the cuticle and, in many taxa, as pheromones that are important for various social interactions including mate choice within populations. However, ECs have not been individually identified in many species and most studies of their role in mate choice have been performed in a labor...
Preprint
High-quality developmental environments often improve individual performance into adulthood, but allocating toward early-life traits, such as growth, development rate, and reproduction, may lead to trade-offs with late life performance. It is therefore uncertain how a rich developmental environment will affect the ageing process (senescence), parti...
Preprint
In animals, the early-life environment influences growth and development, which can have lastingeffects on life history and fitness into adulthood. We investigated patterns of growth, pupaldevelopment time, and their covariation, in wild antler fly larvae (Protopiophila litigata; Diptera:Piophilidae) of both sexes collected from three discarded moo...
Article
The Piophilidae (Diptera) are a family comprising about 80 species, several of them of high economic and forensic relevance. An unequivocal species identification is crucial for designing effective control measures or to provide reliable estimations of the minimum post mortem interval. However, the identification may sometimes not be possible, eith...
Article
Fish odor induces predator avoidance behaviors in zooplankton, like vertical migration, by making zooplankton more responsive to light. Odor cues that alter behavior in marine crustacean zooplankton in the laboratory include sulfated glycosaminoglycans (sGAGs) derived from fish body mucus. Few studies quantify these cues in estuarine/marine environ...
Article
Full-text available
In animals, the early-life environment influences growth and development, which can have lasting effects on life history and fitness into adulthood. We investigated the patterns of growth, pupal development time, and their covariation in Protopiophila litigata Bonduriansky (Diptera: Piophilidae) larvae of both sexes collected from three discarded m...
Poster
Full-text available
The Piophilidae (Diptera) are a relatively small family comprising around 80 species of mainly sarcosaprophagous habits. Piophilids can represent major pests for the food industry, but can also be used as forensic indicators in forensic investigations. In this kind of investigations, a reliable identification of the collected material is an essenti...
Poster
Full-text available
Senescence, a decrease in survival and/or reproduction with age, is a widespread dimension of life histories. Theory links the evolution of senescence to a reduced strength of selection on old age classes due ultimately to extrinsic (i.e. age-independent) mortality. However, most aging research has been carried out in the lab, where extrinsic morta...
Article
Nest-site choice in turtles has a demonstrated impact on their fitness. Previous studies of nest-site choice have focused on environmental factors potentially affecting that choice (e.g., temperature, insolation, soil type, or moisture). Observations of nesting of painted turtles (Chrysemys picta) at the Crescent Lake National Wildlife Refuge in th...

Questions

Questions (2)
Question
I am about to do an analysis looking at allometry in the two sexes. I'm would like to fit a linear model in R with the form Trait ~ BodySize + Sex + BodySize:Sex. This will allow me to test whether the slopes are different for each sex (significance of the BodySize:Sex interaction term), but I also would like to test whether each trait is isometric (slope = 1), or has negative or positive allometry (slope < 1 or >1) within each group.
The function confint() will give me confidence intervals on the "dummy variables" representing the difference from the reference level (i.e. the difference of the male slope from the female), but is there a way to get the 95% CI on the "male" slope as I do for the reference level? Is there a function that will do that for me, or alternatively, can you let me know how to do it by hand?
Thanks in advance!
Chris
Question
I am designing a comparative study of life history traits among a small family of flies (Piophilidae, 82 spp worldwide). Seven species are present at my usual field site (Algonquin Park, ON). I suspect his is not a satisfactory sample size. How many should I aim for? In Eastern Canada I can probably collect between 12-15 species. Would that be an appropriate number to compare?

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
Most research on senescence has been conducted on either short lived animals (nematodes, fruit flies, mice) in laboratory settings, or long lived vertebrates in the wild. Since current theory predicts that senescence has evolved in response to extrinsic mortality factors, such as predation or resource limitation, it is important to measure its effects under those conditions. Laboratory studies remove most extrinsic risks, potentially overestimating the realized effect of aging. Antler flies, with high site fidelity and short adult life span, provide a rich opportunity to study the evolutionary ecology of aging in the wild. I am investigating the effects of condition (i.e. diet quality) on senescence in males and females, and the fitness effects of aging on individuals and their offspring.