Christophe Carlei

Christophe Carlei
University of Geneva | UNIGE · Faculty of Psychology and Education Sciences (FAPSE)

PhD

About

20
Publications
1,036
Reads
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49
Citations
Additional affiliations
January 2016 - May 2016
Montclair State University
Position
  • Adjunct teacher
Description
  • PSYC 301 : «Experimental Psychology» (Undergraduates students)
February 2013 - present
University of Geneva
Position
  • Research Assistant
Education
April 2013 - September 2016
University of Geneva
Field of study
  • Psychology
September 2012 - June 2014
University of Geneva
Field of study
  • Learning and Teaching Technologies
September 2011 - August 2013
University of Geneva
Field of study
  • Neurosciences

Publications

Publications (20)
Article
A previous study reported superior categorical and coordinate spatial task performance in inconsistent-versus consistent-right-handers (ICH versus CRH). Propper et al. used a three-dimensional (3D) computer-based task wherein individuals navigated to 21 locations within a realistic cityscape. During testing, participants were queried on their categ...
Article
Earlier research suggested that gaze direction has an impact on cognitive processing. It is likely that horizontal gaze direction increases activation in specific areas of the contralateral cerebral hemisphere. Consistent with the lateralization of memory functions, we previously showed that shifting gaze to the left improves visuo-spatial short-te...
Article
Categorical versus coordinate spatial tasks rely differentially on the left versus right hemisphere. Given the neuroanatomical and neurophysiological differences between inconsistent- versus consistent-right-handers (ICH versus CRH, respectively), such that the former demonstrates increased access to right hemisphere processes relative to the latte...
Article
We tested whether two known hemi-field asymmetries would affect visual search with face stimuli. Holistic processing of spatial configurations is better in the left hemi-field, reflecting a right hemisphere specialization, and object recognition is better in the upper visual field, reflecting stronger projections into the ventral stream. Faces tap...
Poster
Full-text available
We measured behavioral and electrophysiological asymmetries in the additional singleton paradigm. The perceptual asymmetries between the left and right visual hemifields are believed to reflect the functional differences between the left and right hemispheres.The hemispheric asymmetries can be tested by presenting stimuli to one hemifield (laterali...
Article
The orientation-bias hypothesis states that there is a bias to attend to the right visual hemifield (RVF) when there is spatial competition between stimuli in the left and right hemifield [Pollmann, S. (1996). A pop-out induced extinction-like phenomenon in neurologically intact subjects. Neuropsychologia, 34(5), 413–425. doi:10.1016/0028-3932(95)0...
Article
A large body of evidence supports the existence of a robust handedness difference in episodic memory retrieval, with inconsistent-handedness being associated with superior memory across a wide variety of paradigms, including superior retrieval of lab-based and real world memories. Despite superior episidoc memory in inconsistent-handers, and despit...
Thesis
Full-text available
The goal of the present work was to investigate both horizontal and vertical asymmetries. In Chapter 1: Experiments 1-6 and Experiments 7-9, we used different types of visual search tasks in which geometrical shapes and face stimuli were displayed on peripheral vision. In Chapter 2: Experiments 10-12 and Experiments 13-15, we used gaze direction as...
Poster
Asymmetries between left and right as well as upper and lower visual hemifield were investigated using a visual detection task with face stimuli. Participants had to detect a face with a gaze direction different from the remaining faces. Gaze was either direct (looking straight ahead) or indirect (looking sideways). The gaze singleton was either a...
Poster
Full-text available
We tested whether two known hemi-field asymmetries would affect visual search for entire faces and gazes. Holistic processing is better in the left hemi-field, reflecting a right hemisphere specialization. Interestingly, this right-hemisphere dominance also appears for neural circuits related to gaze processing that are crucial in face perception....
Code
Analyze your data per block and per period of interest. The outcome is per Optode (1 to 16), per electrodes (F7, FP1, FP2, F8) and per hemisphere (left vs right). This script is made for a 16 optodes sensor pad.
Poster
Full-text available
Our findings suggest that characteristics of the stimulus are crucial when investigating hemi-field asymmetries in face processing, but for typical face stimuli, search performance is best in the left and upper hemi-field.
Poster
Full-text available
Earlier research suggested that gaze direction has an impact on cognitive processing. It is likely that gaze directed to the left or right increases activation in specific areas of the contralateral cerebral hemisphere. Consistent with the lateralization of memory functions, we previously showed that shifting gaze to the (upper) left improves visuo...
Poster
Asymmetries between left and right as well as upper and lower visual hemifield were investigated using pop-out search. Participants searched for a shape singleton and reported the orientation of a line segment inside the shape singleton. The target’s line orientation did not pop out, whereas its shape did. Our results showed that participants were...
Article
Full-text available
Cerebral asymmetries and cortical regions associated with the upper and lower visual field were investigated using shifts of gaze. Earlier research suggests that gaze shifts to the left or right increase activation of specific areas of the contralateral hemisphere. We asked whether looking at one quadrant of the visual field facilitates the recall...
Poster
Full-text available
Asymmetries between left and right as well as upper and lower visual hemifield were investigated using pop-out search. Participants searched for a shape singleton and reported the orientation of a line segment inside the shape singleton. The target’s line orientation did not pop out, whereas its shape did. Our results showed that participants were...
Poster
Full-text available
Cerebral asymmetries and cortical regions associated with the upper and lower visual field were investigated using shifts of gaze. Earlier research suggests that gaze shifts to the left or right increase activation of specific areas of the contralateral hemisphere. We asked whether looking at one quadrant of the visual field facilitates the recall...
Poster
Full-text available
Hemispheric asymmetries were investigated by changing the horizontal position of stimuli that had to be remembered in a visuo-spatial short-term memory task. Observers looked at matrices containing a variable number of filled squares on the left or right side of the screen center. At stimulus offset, participants reproduced the positions of the fil...

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