Christine Schoenberg

Christine Schoenberg
National Sun Yat-sen University | NSYSU · Department of Marine Science

PhD, Carl von Ossietzky University Oldenburg
Filling gaps, linking, meshing, testing and exploring. Bioerosion, sponge ecology, coral reef health. Now in Taiwan.

About

168
Publications
37,446
Reads
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3,214
Citations
Citations since 2016
54 Research Items
2129 Citations
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20162017201820192020202120220100200300400
20162017201820192020202120220100200300400
Additional affiliations
October 2015 - February 2016
affiliated to the University of Western Australia and the Western Australian Museum
Position
  • Researcher
April 2015 - September 2015
Western Australian Museum
Position
  • Aquatic Zoologist
Description
  • Technical officer and research adjunct
April 2015 - present
The Western Australian Museum
Position
  • Research Associate
Education
September 1995 - October 2000
Carl von Ossietzky Universität Oldenburg
Field of study
  • Biology (Marine Ecology)
July 1992 - September 1993
January 1988 - February 1989

Publications

Publications (168)
Article
Corals have widely been reported to be affected by elevated temperature levels undergoing bleaching and mortality. Photosymbiotic clionaid sponges have often been observed to fare better in changing climatic conditions and were rarely reported to bleach. However, during a yearlong observation from the Gulf of Mannar, India, a sponge from the Cliona...
Data
This global address list provides information compiled by Christine Schönberg between December 2014 to February 2022. It was collated through annual surveys posted on PoriferaList, by checking through the Internet and by contacting some people directly. Please cite this resource as Schönberg CHL (2022) Who is who in sponge science 2022. In: De Voog...
Article
The need to study sponge communities in comparatively inaccessible habitats led to a sponge classification system that relies on the strictly functional interpretation of traditional sponge morphologies. The aim is to deliver a standardised approach that can optionally be based on imagery and can be applied across all oceans and to any water depth....
Data
The WPD, the World Database of all Recent sponges ever described, is part of the World Register of Marine Species (WoRMS), a global initiative to arrive at a register of all marine organisms. The WPD is complementary to the Systema Porifera (editors Hooper & Van Soest, 2002), the two volume comprehensive classification of all sponge taxa above the...
Article
Sponges that excavate and inhabit calcareous substrate, predominantly of the Clionaidae, are widely distributed in marine habitats, but are particularly diverse and abundant on coral reefs. Unfortunately, their cryptic habit and difficult taxonomy mean respective taxa are poorly understood, and therefore they are rarely included in reef surveys. Th...
Data
This global address list provides information compiled by Christine Schönberg between December 2014 to February 2021. It was collated through annual surveys posted on PoriferaList, by checking through the Internet and by contacting some people directly. Please cite this resource as Schönberg CHL (2021) Who is who in sponge science 2021. In: Van Soe...
Article
The integration of morphological and molecular markers is essential in the recognition of inter- and intra-specific variability, as well as to distinguish species. Spicular characters of the excavating sponge Cliona mucronata Sollas, 1878 were reported to vary depending on sample origin, suggesting the existence of an unrecognized species complex....
Data
Global address list of sponge workers 2020. Including people's research interests and keyword searchable.
Article
Photosynthesis is an important driver of calcium carbonate deposition on tropical coral reefs largely due to the symbiosis of numerous invertebrates with photosynthetic dinoflagellates in the family Symbiodiniaceae. In bioeroding sponges, however, similar symbioses appear to support the decalcification of carbonate substrates. Compared to its role...
Article
Bioeroding sponges are important macroborers that chemically cut out substrate particles (chips) and mechanically remove them, thereby contributing to reef-associated sediment. These chemical and mechanical proportions vary with elevated levels of partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO2). To assess related impacts, the morphometric parameters “chi...
Research
Full-text available
The WPD, the World Database of all Recent sponges ever described, is part of the World Register of Marine Species (WoRMS), a global initiative to arrive at a register of all marine organisms. The WPD is complementary to the Systema Porifera (editors Hooper & Van Soest, 2002), the two volume comprehensive classification of all sponge taxa above the...
Article
Coral cores taken from Great Barrier Reef massive Porites sp. were assessed for bioerosion by the brown demosponge Cliona orientalis Thiele, 1900, but also yielded evidence for microbial bioerosion that was partly simultaneously active with the sponge bioerosion. The most common microborer traces throughout wereIchnoreticulina elegans (Radtke, 1991...
Data
Global address list of people working on sponges and key words of their research interests. Also publicly available at http://www.marinespecies.org/porifera/porifera.php?p=sourcedetails&id=337900
Article
The endolithic and endopsammic habits in sponges promote similar morphologies and offer similar ecological niches of being protected and anchored. We assessed whether this also induces similar functions, i.e., whether the commonly endopsammic sponge Coelocarteria singaporensis (Carter, 1883) shares bioerosion capabilities with clionaid endopsammic...
Data
Supplementary file for Mote et al. 2019: S1 - A photograph of Cliona thomasi sp. nov.; S2.1-2.5 - Tables with raw data for C. thomasi tylostyle dimensions of the type material and additional material; S3.1-3.4 - Size frequency distributions of C. thomasi tylostyle lengths; S4.1-4.22 Raw data for C. thomasi spicule dimensions and descriptive statist...
Article
Coral reef ecosystems depend on the balanced interplay of constructive and destructive processes and are increasingly threatened by environmental change. In this context bioeroding sponges play a significant role in carbonate cycling and sediment production. They occasionally aggravate erosional processes on disturbed reefs. Like other coral ecosys...
Data
Global address list of sponge workers 2019. Including people's research interests and keyword searchable.
Preprint
Full-text available
Research Infrastructures (RIs) are facilities, resources and services used by the scientific community to conduct research and foster innovation. LifeWatch ERIC has developed various virtual research environments, which include many virtual laboratories (vLabs) offering high computational capacity and comprehensive collaborative platforms that supp...
Preprint
Full-text available
Research Infrastructures (RIs) are facilities, resources and services used by the scientific community to conduct research and foster innovation. LifeWatch ERIC has developed various virtual research environments, which include many virtual laboratories (vLabs) offering high computational capacity and comprehensive collaborative platforms that supp...
Article
Full-text available
The bioeroding sponge Cliona orientalis is photosymbiotic with dinoflagellates of the genus Symbiodinium and is pervasive on the Great Barrier Reef. We investigated how C. orientalis responded to past and future ocean conditions in a simulated community setting. The experiment lasted over an Austral summer under four carbon dioxide emission scenari...
Preprint
Full-text available
Research Infrastructures (RIs) are facilities, resources and services used by the scientific community to conduct research and foster innovation. LifeWatch ERIC has developed various virtual research environments, which include many virtual laboratories (vLabs) offering high computational capacity and comprehensive collaborative platforms that supp...
Article
Despite global deterioration of coral reef health, not all reef-associated organisms are in decline. Bioeroding sponges are thought to be largely resistant to the factors that stress and kill corals, and are increasing in abundance on many reefs. However, there is a paucity of information on how environmental factors influence spatial variation in...
Article
Sponges play an important role in biogenic coral-reef degradation, and it is acknowledged that elevated levels of sponge erosion commonly indicate poor health of coral-reef environments. An increase in the abundance of coral-excavating sponge has been reported from several locations, a development that may move coral-reef carbonate budgets increasi...
Data
Schönberg CHL (2018) Who is who in sponge science 2018. In: Van Soest RWM, Boury-Esnault N, Hooper JNA, Rützler K, de Voogd NJ, Alvarez B, Hajdu E, Pisera AB, Manconi R, Schönberg CHL, Klautau M, Picton B, Kelly M, Vacelet J, Dohrmann M, Díaz M-C, Cárdenas P, Carballo JL, Rios P, Downey R (2018) World Porifera Database. Accessed at http://www.marin...
Article
Full-text available
Excavating sponges are prominent bioeroders on coral reefs that in comparison to other benthic organisms may suffer less or may even benefit from warmer, more acidic and more eutrophic waters. Here, the photosymbiotic excavating sponge Cliona orientalis from the Great Barrier Reef was subjected to a prolonged simulation of both global and local env...
Chapter
Bioeroding sponges play a central role in carbonate cycling on corals reefs. They may respond differently to habitat deterioration than many other benthic invertebrates, because at some locations, their abundances increased after disturbance. We reviewed literature on these sponges in context of environmental change and provide meta-analyses at glo...
Article
Full-text available
A recent literature review by Scho ̈nberg et al. (2017) on bioerosion under ocean acidification and global change led to a detailed com- ment by Silbiger and DeCarlo (2017). We use the opportunity to reply to this comment, to correct misinterpreted data and to fur- ther stimulate the discussion in bioerosion science. We still believe that our paper...
Article
Full-text available
Dinoflagellates of the genus Symbiodinium are symbiotic with a wide range of marine invertebrates. Broadly described as a mutualistic symbiosis, possible parasitic tendencies of Symbiodinium are less well known. The present study investigated the potential for mutualistic Symbiodinium to become parasitic in the excavating sponge Cliona orientalis,...
Article
Perceived changes in the culture of sponge science and sponge conferences served as motivation for an evaluation of the sponge science community and research, over time and at present. Observed changes included a decrease in proceedings publications on sponge fossils and freshwater sponges, sponges from temperate environments, review papers and dat...
Article
Bioerosion of calcium carbonate is the natural counterpart of biogenic calcification. Both are affected by ocean acidification (OA). We summarize definitions and concepts in bioerosion research and knowledge in the context of OA, providing case examples and meta-analyses. Chemically mediated bioerosion relies on energy demanding, biologically contr...
Data
This global address list of people working in sponge science was put together to advance collaboration and to support communication.
Data
Extensive supplementary data to the review on bioerosion and global change published in the ICES Journal of Marine Science (available at https://academic.oup.com/icesjms/article/3064242/Bioerosion:)
Article
Excavating sponges often compete with reef-building corals. To study sponge–coral interactions, we devised a design of hybrid cores that allows sponges and corals to be arranged side by side with similar size and shape, mimicking the situation of neighbouring organisms. Compared to earlier methods that attached sponge cores onto coral surfaces, hyb...
Article
Full-text available
Biological erosion is a key process for the recycling of carbonate and the formation of calcareous sediments in the oceans. Experimental studies showed that bioerosion is subject to distinct temporal variability, but previous long-term studies were restricted to tropical waters. Here, we present results from a 14-year bioerosion experiment that was...
Article
Full-text available
Disturbance releases space and allows the growth of opportunistic species, excluded by the old stands, with a potential to alter community dynamics. In coral reefs, abundances of fast-growing, and disturbance-tolerant sponges are expected to increase and dominate as space becomes available following acute coral mortality events. Yet, an increase in...
Article
Full-text available
Marine bioerosion is projected to increase under future environmental conditions, and interest in investigating the ecological roles of bioeroding sponges has grown substantially over recent years. Cliona orientalis Thiele, 1900 is an important bioeroding sponge on Indo-Pacific coral reefs that belongs to the Cliona viridis species complex, which i...
Conference Paper
New Frontiers in Sponge Science – the 2013 Fremantle Sponge Conference - Volume 96 Issue 2 - Christine Hanna Lydia Schönberg, Jane Fromont, John Hooper, Shirley Sorokin, Wei Zhang, Nicole De Voogd
Data
Full-text available
Global address list of sponge workers.
Article
Full-text available
Biological erosion is a key process for the recycling of carbonate and the formation of calcareous sediments in the oceans. Experimental studies showed that bioerosion is subject to distinct temporal variability, but previous long-term studies were restricted to tropical waters. Here, we present results from a 14 year bioerosion experiment that was...
Article
Being sessile filter feeders, sponges may be disadvantaged by sediments in many ways, e.g. through clogging and burial. However, in order to correctly recognize negative effects of sediments in the field, natural relationships of sponge taxa adapted to a life with sediments need to be understood. The present publication reviews available literature...
Article
Full-text available
We report severe bleaching in a turbid water coral community in northwestern Australia. Towed still imagery was used for a benthic survey near Onslow in March 2013 to assess thermal stress in hard and soft corals, finding 51–68% of all corals fully bleached in 10–15-m water depth. Tabulate or foliaceous Turbinaria was the locally most abundant hard...
Technical Report
Available at http://www.wamsi.org.au/sites/wamsi.org.au/files/files/Effects_of_Dredging_on_Filter_Feeders_Review_WAMSI_DSN_Report_6_1_Schönberg_2016_FINAL.pdf Marine filter feeders are important components of benthic environments providing a range of critical ecological functions including habitat provision, filtration of large quantities of water...
Article
Full-text available
Imagery collected by still and video cameras is an increasingly important tool for minimal impact, repeatable observations in the marine environment. Data generated from imagery includes identification, annotation and quantification of biological subjects and environmental features within an image. To be long-lived and useful beyond their project-s...
Article
Full-text available
Bioeroding sponges of the Cliona viridis species complex play a large role in carbonate cycling and reef health. In the present study we provide the first record and a description of a Mediterranean lineage of C. viridis (Schmidt, 1862) in the southwestern Atlantic. Specimens were collected in Maricás Archipelago, Rio de Janeiro State in September...
Article
Full-text available
The biology and ecology of calcarean sponges are not as well understood as they are for demosponges. Here, in order to gain new insights, particularly about symbiotic relationships, the calcarean sponge Leucetta prolifera was sampled from south-western Australia and examined for its assumed photosymbionts. Pulse amplitude modulated fluorometry and...
Data
Full-text available
This global address list reflects information as compiled between February and June 2015. It was collated through a survey posted on mailing lists (PoriferaList, CoraList and Skolithos) and by contacting some people directly. The information was collected and made available by Christine Schönberg (count 304 in present list). Please cite this resour...
Article
Relating to recent environmental changes, bioerosion rates of calcium carbonate materials appear to be increasing worldwide, often driven by sponges that cause bioerosion and are recognized bioindicators for coral reef health. Various field methods were compared to encourage more vigorous research on bioeroding sponges and their inclusion in major...
Article
Full-text available
Carbonate budgets of coral reefs are maintained by the balance of calcification, decalcification and the export of detrital materials from the reefs. The first two processes are largely biologically driven, with biological decalcification being defined here as bioerosion and carried out by a wide range of bioeroders from microbes to vertebrates. Bi...
Article
As filter feeders, sponges are thought to be at risk in high sediment environments, but many species can tolerate exposure to sediments or benefit from it (Cerrano et al. 2007). Some sponges can maintain clean surfaces even in intensive sedimentation (Fig. 1A–D). Apart from descriptions of active cleaning processes, almost nothing has yet been publ...
Chapter
Full-text available
Sponge taxonomy is difficult and challenging, it requires adequate laboratory facilities, experience and time, which are often not available. Moreover, not all habitats can be physically sampled (e.g. protected areas, deep sea), and for monitoring purposes video work is usually the preferred method. However, sponges cannot reliably be identified fr...
Chapter
Research conducted in the Mediterranean significantly contributed to our understanding of bioerosion, providing faunistic records and key information about the succession that occurs when fresh substrate is colonized by eroding biota. Bioeroders that have a substantial role in the Mediterranean are microendoliths, sponges, boring mollusks and vario...
Article
In many marine biogeographic realms bioeroding sponges dominate the internal bioerosion of calcareous substrates such as mollusc beds and coral reef framework. They biochemically dissolve part of the carbonate and liberate so-called sponge chips, a process that is expected to be facilitated and accelerated in a more acidic environment inherent to t...
Data
In many marine biogeographic realms, bioeroding sponges dominate the internal bioerosion of calcareous substrates such as mollusc beds and coral reef framework. They biochemically dissolve part of the carbonate and liberate so-called sponge chips, a process that is expected to be facilitated and accelerated in a more acidic environment inherent to...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Background / Purpose: Bioeroding organisms are very sheltered with regards to risks of physical damage such as severe tropical storms. Should they survive such storms, however, they will potentially have more settlement substrate due to the damage corals are usually suffering. A rapid survey at Orpheus Island, central Great Barrier Reef was under...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Background / Purpose: Marine construction includes dredging and requires environmental assessments. Recognising the immense importance of Australian filter feeder habitats, benthic surveys were conducted ‘before dredging’ near Onslow, NW Australia. Main conclusion: Onslow filter feeder communities were patchily distributed but clearly dominate...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Background / Purpose: Fisheries and coastal construction such as dredging projects damage marine benthic communities. Little is known on how this affects sponges. Five tropical reef sponges from the Great Barrier Reef were subjected to the following treatments: daily covering with sand, daily covering with mud, an initial 24h application of clamp...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Background / Purpose: Bioeroding sponges appear to be increasing worldwide. We tested the effects of ocean acidification and temperature on a Great Barrier Reef photosymbiotic bioeroding sponge and a North Sea asymbiotic sponge. Main conclusion: Temperature affected the photobiology of the first sponge, but its effects on bioerosion was not cl...