Christine Kenney

Christine Kenney
Massey University · School of Psychology

PhD

About

30
Publications
12,495
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406
Citations
Introduction
Christine Kenney is Professor of Disaster Risk Reduction at Massey University, and Director of Te Toi Whakaruruhau o Aotearoa, New Zealand’s Māori Disaster Research Centre. A dual background in disaster sociology and health, has shaped her research and policy work, which focuses on disaster risk reduction, climate change, gender, health and humanitarian issues. Christine has expertise leading projects in Canada, Australia, and New Zealand, and regularly works with WHO and UN agencies.

Publications

Publications (30)
Book
Full-text available
GAR2022 explores how, around the world, structures are evolving to better address systemic risk. The report shows how governance systems can evolve to reflect the interconnected value of people, the planet and prosperity. www.undrr.org/gar2022
Chapter
Collaborative disaster risk reduction and management in New Zealand - a commentary on the relationships between Central government, local authorities and New Zealand's indigenous peoples collectivized under the term 'Maori'.
Conference Paper
Full-text available
A community-of-practice (CoP) is a community that comprises of members that build relationships with each other to create technical advancements motivated by shared goals. Establishing communities-of-practice has been demonstrated to enhance exchange and mobilisation of knowledge and facilitate the adoption and use of technological systems. At the...
Article
Full-text available
There is an emerging area of research that examines men’s personal disaster accounts, including how gender identities and sets of understandings about masculinities shape response and recovery. This paper adds to the literature through providing a geographic enquiry into men’s sense of place and identifying the impacts of the Kaikōura/Waiau (7.8 Mw...
Chapter
Full-text available
Global advocacy for culturally diverse and socially inclusive approaches to climate change risk mitigation and adaption is developing. The 2015 Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction, a prime exemplar, promotes policy recognition of Indigenous environmental management knowledges and practices. Yet, inclusion of Indigenous climate change manag...
Article
Full-text available
This paper draws on the geographies of emotion and mas-culinities literature to explore rural men's experiences of the 2016 Kaik oura/Waiau earthquake in Aotearoa, New Zealand. Qualitative semi-structured interviews were conducted with 19 men affected by the earthquake. Geographies of emotion enable reflection on the social context and individual c...
Chapter
Full-text available
4.12.1 Learning objectives To understand key factors to consider when developing a qualitative study for health emergency and disaster risk management (Health EDRM) research, including: 1. The epistemological foundations of qualitative research commonly used in disaster research. 2. Common qualitative research methodologies used extensively in disa...
Article
Full-text available
Purpose The paper illustrates how accountability of collaborative governance was constituted in the context of disaster managerial work carried out by the Government, local authorities, and Maori community organisations, after the 2010–2011 Canterbury earthquakes in New Zealand. Design/methodology/approach A case study detailing the communitarian...
Article
The field of gender and disasters emerged from the notion that a disaster is a physically and socially constructed event. Recognition that women's position in society and the home increases vulnerabilities to disasters has led to the development and application of gender in disaster policy and practice over the last three decades. Gender research h...
Article
Full-text available
Drawing on Māori (Aotearoa-New Zealand), First Nations (Canada), and Navajo Nation (U.S.), case studies and practitioners’ experiences, this article addresses a gap in our understanding of the role of volunteers in emergencies and disasters in Indigenous communities. Enablers and challenges to effective volunteering in these Indigenous communities...
Poster
Full-text available
INTRODUCTION: There is an urgency to plan for, and reduce disaster risk as argued by the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction. However to achieve this, disaster risk reduction (DRR) approaches need to be more people-centred and inclusive of diverse and marginalised groups. People with high body mass have been recognised as one such group, h...
Chapter
On 4 September 2010 an earthquake measuring 7.1 Ms occurred in Christchurch, New Zealand, heralding a series of earthquakes, which caused widespread devastation, injury to over 9000 inhabitants and the loss of 185 lives. Eastern Christchurch, the region most impacted by the earthquakes, primarily comprised communities with limited socio-economic re...
Article
Full-text available
This paper reviews the historical research that has led to widespread policies on compact urban form, in particular, residential development, and collates evidence that demonstrates that dispersed urban form may be more energy efficient than compact form. This is counterintuitive but is supported by both challenging the conventional modelling of en...
Article
Full-text available
The Inverse Care Law is principally concerned with the effect of market forces on health care which create inequities in access to health services through privileging individuals who possess the forms of social capital that are valued within health care settings. The fields of disaster risk reduction need to consider the ways in which inequities, d...
Article
New Zealand media reports have shaped public discourses on the role of community stakeholders in responding to the devastation caused by the 2010-2011 Canterbury earthquakes and the Kaikoura Earthquake in 2016. Anecdotal evidence has also suggested that Maori disaster management responses to both contexts received differing levels of media attentio...
Article
Full-text available
The Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction (2015) is a global strategy for addressing disaster risk and resilience that has been ratified by member countries of the United Nations. Its guiding principles emphasise building resilience through inter-sectoral collaboration, as well as partnerships that facilitate community empowerment and addres...
Article
Full-text available
Since September 2010, a series of earthquakes have caused widespread social, financial and environmental devastation in Christchurch, New Zealand. Anecdotal evidence suggests that local Māori responded effectively to facilitate community recovery and resilience. However, the form, content and extent of that response has not been adequately recognis...
Article
Full-text available
Within the disaster response and research sectors, there is increasing recognition of the value of community-led initiatives that facilitate emergency management, risk reduction and community resilience. In contrast, the value of cultural approaches to disaster management and recovery is rarely acknowledged. The Māori disaster management response t...
Article
Full-text available
Since September 2010, a series of earthquakes have caused widespread social, financial and environmental devastation in Christchurch, New Zealand. Anecdotal evidence suggests that local Māori responded effectively to facilitate community recovery and resilience. Cultural technologies that are protective in times of adversity have previously been no...
Article
Full-text available
On September 4, 2010 a 7.1 magnitude earthquake struck the Canterbury region of New Zealand, heralding a sequence of earthquakes, which included a fatal 6.2 earthquake centred under Christchurch City on February 22, 2011. In response, local Māori recovery initiatives were collaborative, effective and shaped by cultural values, including the princip...
Article
Full-text available
This chapter discusses the relationship between resilience, recovery, and development in relation to the 2009 Victoria, Australia wildfires and the 2011 Christchurch earthquake; events that have had significant implications for Australian and New Zealand approaches to Disaster Risk Reduction and post-disaster development. Following a review of the...
Article
Full-text available
The paper reports onfive early career researchers from around the world were selected to review the RIA framework under the theme of 'decision-making under conditions of uncertainty', and develop novel theoretical approaches to respond to and improve this framework. Six working groups emerged during the seminar: 1. the assessment of water-related r...
Article
Full-text available
New Zealand health legislation requires mid-wives to affirm Māori as tangata whenua (people of the land) and actively honour the principles of partnership, protection and participation as an affirmation of the Treaty of Waitangi. Despite the introduction of some Māori values (Ngā Turanga Kaupapa) into performance criteria for professional competenc...

Projects

Projects (3)
Project
This is a community and citizen-centric IoT based research project. The project is currently funded by the NZ's Earth Quake Commission and Massey University. This research project investigates the feasibility of an affordable socio-technical earthquake early warning (EEW) solutions for New Zealand. Emerging technologies such as micro-seismic sensors (MS) and internet-of-things (IoT) are at the forefront of providing viable low-cost early warning options. A low-cost EEW may be viable through forming a low-coast IoT network consisting of low-cost microcontroller and seismograph embedded sensors connected through existing communication infrastructure. Utilising these emerging technologies towards an EEW system requires essential participation of engaged communities and citizens.
Archived project