Christine M. Jacobsen

Christine M. Jacobsen
University of Bergen | UiB · Department of Social Anthropology

Professor

About

30
Publications
3,960
Reads
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401
Citations
Citations since 2017
9 Research Items
261 Citations
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Introduction
Christine M. Jacobsen is professor at the Department of Social Anthropology, University of Bergen. She is affiliated with the research units IMER (International Migration and Ethnic Relations) and SKOK (Centre for Women's and Gender Research). Her research interests include migration, minority, and gender studies.

Publications

Publications (30)
Article
Full-text available
This article focuses on recent French efforts to expand legal regulation of religious symbols to childcare. Controversies over ‘veiled nannies’ serve as points of departure for investigating laïcité – French secularism – through which religion is regulated. The investigation is based on fieldwork among Muslim women in Marseille and on the analysis...
Chapter
In this chapter we look at one specific investment after Strathern: what has become know as the Cambridge version of the ontological turn. The aim of the chapter is to highlight both the feminist genealogy of this new direction in anthropology, but also to point to parallels in queer theory. We stage a comparison between Strathern’s analysis of mal...
Book
Full-text available
This edited volume approaches waiting both as a social phenomenon that proliferates in irregularised forms of migration and as an analytical perspective on migration processes and practices. Waiting as an analytical perspective offers new insights into the complex and shifting nature of processes of bordering, belonging, state power, exclusion and...
Article
Full-text available
The article investigates how the concept of victimhood is constructed within debates on transnational prostitution and trafficking, and how representations of victimhood intersect with representations of the person/self, class, ethnicity, gender and nationality. Using research findings based on observation and interviews with women from post-Soviet...
Article
Full-text available
In recent years, Muslims have become more visibly invested in humanitarian work in France. Based on ethnographic fieldwork in Marseille, this article examines local initiatives to care for precarious others whose lives are neither materially supported nor socially recognized within the current French political regime. Engaging with critical French...
Article
In this article we explore the role of music in shaping and publicizing religious and political subjectivities and belonging among young Muslims in Norway. The article discusses practices of producing and listening to music in light of theories about 'counterpublics' and their soundscapes, the religious and the secular, and majority-minority relati...
Chapter
With their complex and historically shifting articulations of equality, sameness, and difference, discourses and practices related to gender and sexuality provide fertile ground for exploring the complex meanings and functions of egalitarianism. This chapter, first, examines the public debate in Norway through policy documents on gender equality, h...
Article
This essay addresses the question of how irregular migration is framed in Western media from the location of the migration researcher. What challenges and dilemmas do media frames and practices of framing create for researchers’ participation in communicating research about irregular migration to the public? The essay is written in dialogue with to...
Article
Full-text available
In this fourth round table, four researchers answer questions to assess the state of the art and future perspectives in gender studies related to three countries: Denmark, Norway and Sweden. The researchers have chosen to debate different perspectives that will raise readers' interest, no matter their status be it teacher or learner. The distinctiv...
Article
In the winter of 2008/09 thousands of people took to the streets of Oslo to demonstrate against the Israeli invasion of Gaza. Young people of visible minority and Muslim background were central actors in these demonstrations. The public expression of Muslim identities and symbols during the demonstrations along with clashes between some of the youn...
Book
Kritiske hendelser - nye stemmer undersøker ulike typer politisk engasjement blant unge med minoritetsbakgrunn. En rekke "kritiske hendelser" nasjonalt og internasjonalt har i løpet av de siste tue årene vært med å mobilisere til politisk deltakelse; som Rushdie-saken, Benjamin-saken, Obiora-saken, 11. september, Muhammedkarikaturene, Sifienbergpar...
Article
This article critically addresses recent anthropological and feminist efforts to theorize and analyse Muslim women's participation in and support for the Islamic revival in its various manifestations. Drawing on ethnographic material from research on young Muslims engaged in Islamic youth and student-organizations in Norway, I investigate some of t...
Book
A major question regarding Islam in Europe concerns the religiosity of “Muslim youth” – a category currently epitomizing both the fears and hopes of multicultural Europe. How are Islamic traditions engaged and reworked by young people, born and educated in European societies, and which modes of religiosity will they shape in the future? Providing a...
Article
In this article, we juxtapose the ways “Muslim women” and “foreign prostitutes” are commonly constituted as victims in media and politics. We analyze the functions of these two prototypical female victims in terms of the role they play in epitomizing “the problems of globalization” and in reinforcing the existing social and political structures. Vi...
Article
The production of “Norwegian Muslims” : from immigrants to citizens ? The durable settlement of Muslim immigrants and their descendants has made Islam the second largest religion in Norway. This article deals with young women and men affiliated to Muslim youth and student organizations in Oslo, and the ways in which they publicly engage in redefini...
Article
Full-text available
From the second half of the 1980s, immigration was established as one of the most controversial issues in Norwegian public debate, a phenomenon that intensified in the 1990s as “the immigrant other” increasingly crystallized as the “Muslim other.” The academic field reflects this development. More and more researchers have turned their attention to...
Article
Full-text available
Krav om toleranse overfor homoseksuelle har preget norsk offentlighet de siste to årene. Kravene har i økende grad rettet seg mot «innvandrere», muslimer i særdeleshet. Denne artikkelen tar utgangspunkt i toleransekravene slik de fremsettes i den offentlige debatten om islam og homoseksualitet. Med utgangspunkt i Wendy Browns kritiske analyse av de...
Article
Full-text available
The relationship between multiculturalism and feminism has been hotly debated both theoretically and politically. This article approaches the issue through a critical assessment of Susan Moller Okins article, "Is multiculturalism bad for women?" (1999) and argues that some forms of feminist critique of multiculturalism run the risk of upholding and...

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (4)
Archived project
The WAIT project used theories of temporality and the concept of 'waitinghood' as tools for producing new and critical insights into the cultural conditions and implications of migration. 'Waitinghood' is about the condition of prolonged waiting, uncertainty and temporariness which is characteristic of irregular migration. WAIT investigated how temporal structures related to irregular migration are shaped by legal regimes, cultural norms and power relationships, and how they shape subjective experiences and life projects. The project focused on four European migration-hubs, notably Oslo (Norway), Stockholm (Sweden), Marseille (France) and Hamburg (Germany).
Project
THE RIGHT TO INTERNATIONAL PROTECTION: A PENDULUM BETWEEN GLOBALIZATION AND NATIVIZATION? The vision of PROTECT is to discover ways of further advancing the international protection system within today’s turbulent political context. As a corollary to fluctuations in political cleavage systems of host countries, states’ policy approaches to international protection are drifting away from the humanitarian norms, objectives and methods provided by the current international law. The international refugee regime risks entering an era of decay because of declining citizen support, increasing party populism, growing government opportunism, and the subsequent scapegoating of international organizations. The United Nations’ Global Compact on Migration and the Global Compact on Refugees, which aim to introduce global governance and burden-sharing systems in the areas of migration and international protection, will have to be implemented in a context of international power relations between advocates of different visions of world order and notions international protection associated with them. In order to assess the challenges and opportunities that the Global Compacts pose, PROTECT will organize its research and dissemination efforts around three dimensions of international protection: (a) rights, (b) governance, and (c) public recognition. PROTECT aims to: (1) develop perspectives to international protection that address the challenges posed by the current politically turbulent context (2) assess the impacts of the Global Compacts on the right to international protection, discovering ways of reconstructing their relationships with the pre-existing legal frames that advance international protection (3) assess the impacts of the Global Compacts on the governance of international protection, discovering the most effective modes of global governance (4) assess the impact of the Global Compacts on the public recognition of the right to international protection, identifying the networks and discourses that hinder or facilitate support to international protection.
Project
PROTECT The Right to International Protection. A Pendulum between Globalization and Nativization? is an EU-funded research project which studies the international refugee protection and governance. The vision of PROTECT is to discover ways of advancing the international protection system within today’s turbulent political context. We consist of 11 partner universities in Europe, Canada, and South Africa. WP4: The impacts of the GRC and GMC on the governance of international protection: fieldwork studies of governance in practice Global is not synonymous with abstract or unsubstantial, and migration policies are most strongly felt in sensitive locations. These are the target of WP4 bottom-up analysis. By carrying out two rounds of fieldworks in migratory hotspots in Italy, Greece, Spain, France, South Africa and Canada, WP4 analyses how the impact of GRC and GMC is perceived by governance actors and people entitled to international protection, and by the most closely related actors. In the rounds of interviews and back-talk focus groups, the outcome of global changes in protection governance is unfolded by those who experiment with them locally, and in a variety of perspectives. WP4 unveils them with special attention to vulnerability: how are gender, social, sexual, cultural and other vulnerabilities recognized and safeguarded at the field-level? How do Civil Society Organizations, NGOs and INGOs, local authorities and state representatives incorporate these concerns in their governance of protection? And which are the differences in an EU or global perspective?