Christine Becker

Christine Becker
Geisenheim University · Crop Protection

PhD (Dr. rer. nat.)

About

30
Publications
5,327
Reads
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458
Citations
Citations since 2016
20 Research Items
430 Citations
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100
Additional affiliations
March 2018 - present
Geisenheim University
Position
  • PostDoc Position
April 2016 - September 2017
INRA-PACA, Institut Sophia Agrobiotech
Position
  • PostDoc Position
March 2015 - March 2016
University of Nice Sophia Antipolis
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Education
December 2014 - December 2014
Klaus Tschira Stiftung
Field of study
  • Science Communication
September 2014 - September 2014
Wissenschaft im Dialog
Field of study
  • Science Communication
December 2012 - December 2012
Leibniz-Institute of Vegetable and Ornamental Crops
Field of study
  • Journalistic Writing for Scientists

Publications

Publications (30)
Article
Full-text available
In contrast to constitutively emitted plant volatiles (PV), herbivore-induced plant volatiles (HIPV) are specifically emitted by plants when afflicted with herbivores. HIPV can be perceived by parasitoids and predators which parasitize or prey on the respective herbivores, including parasitic hymenoptera. HIPV act as signals and facilitate host/pre...
Article
Nitrogen (N) and water are crucial in crop production but increasingly scarce environmental resources. Reducing their inputs can affect the whole plant-arthropod community including biocontrol agents. In a multitrophic system, we studied the interaction of the bottom-up effects of moderately reduced N concentration and/or water supply as well as th...
Article
Full-text available
Climate change can affect biological pest control by altering trophic interactions. Elevated carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations can reduce host plant quality and, in turn, alter herbivore and natural enemy preference and performance. Using the Geisenheim VineyardFACE (free-air carbon dioxide enrichment) facility, we studied plant- and herbivore-me...
Article
Abiotic and biotic factors affect plants in various ways which in turn affect associated arthropod communities through direct and/or indirect bottom-up interactions. Several review articles have synthesized studies examining the indirect effects of abiotic factors on plant-arthropod interactions, mainly focusing on soil nitrogen, soil water status,...
Article
Purpose The purpose of this paper is to identify which plant protection practices consumers prefer and why. The authors focused on beneficial insects, genetically modified (GM) plants, synthetic chemical pesticides, biological plant protection, mechanical-physical plant protection as well as biotechnical plant protection. The authors studied the ef...
Article
1.Density‐ and trait‐mediated indirect interactions (DMIIs and TMIIs, respectively) are important drivers of community dynamics but how plant nutrients (bottom‐up effects) affect the magnitude of such indirect interactions has been scarcely addressed. 2.To assess the impact of bottom‐up forces on indirect interactions, we carried out lab and greenh...
Article
Full-text available
Extended Abstract: Climate change can threaten our food production. Because of changing temperatures and concentrations of greenhouse gases, well-established pest insect control techniques may have to be adapted to the changing requirements to stay effective. In particular temperature, elevated carbon dioxide (CO 2) and ozone concentrations will ha...
Article
Full-text available
Soil abiotic factors and plant traits are able to trigger bottom-up effects along the tri-trophic plant–herbivore–natural enemy interactions. The consequences could be useful for controlling the insect herbivores. The South American tomato pinworm, Tuta absoluta Meyrick (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae), a devastating invasive leaf-mining pest on tomato a...
Article
Full-text available
In the original publication of the article, the article type was incorrectly published as “Original Paper”. However, the correct article type is “Review Paper”.
Article
Full-text available
We evaluated the effects of phosphate (Pi-deficiency: 0.1 mM; Pi-sufficiency: 0.5 mM), phosphite (low-Phi: 0.1 mM; medium-Phi: 0.5 mM; and high-Phi: 2.5 mM), and two mean daily photosynthetically active radiations (lower PAR: 22.2 mol ⋅ m-2 ⋅ d-1; higher PAR: 29.7 mol ⋅ m-2 ⋅ d-1), as well as their interactions, on flavonoid, nitrate and glucosinol...
Article
The effect of suboptimal supply of nitrogen (N) and of replacing nitrate in the nutrient solution with ammonia on growth, yield, and nitrate concentration in green and red leaf lettuce was evaluated over two seasons (autumn and spring) using multiple regression analysis. The plants were grown in a greenhouse on a Nutrient Film Technique (NFT) syste...
Article
Effects of organic waste from hydroponic system added with minerals (organo-mineral fertilizer) and synthetic fertilizer on major polyphenols of red oak leaf lettuce using HPLC-DAD-ESI-MS3 were investigated. Interestingly, contents of the main flavonoid glycosides and caffeic acid derivatives of lettuce treated with organo-mineral fertilizer were e...
Article
Full-text available
Carbon dioxide (CO2) enrichment is a common practice in greenhouses to increase crop yields up to 30%. Yet, reports on the effect on foliar phenolic compounds vary. We studied the effect on two red leaf lettuce cultivars, grown for 25days in growth chambers at CO2 concentrations of 200 or 1000ppm, with some plants exchanged between treatments after...
Article
Full-text available
Reduction of nitrogen application in crop production is desirable for ecological and health-related reasons. Interestingly, nitrogen deficiency can lead to enhanced concentrations of polyphenols in plants. The reason for this is still under discussion. The plants' response to low nitrogen concentration can interact with other factors, for example r...
Chapter
Full-text available
Six years ago, four universities and five research institutes started the joint research project ZINEG. Their goal was to produce plants in greenhouses with minimal consumption of fossil energy. In a system oriented approach they combined process engineering and cultivation measures. At the IGZ, research focused on cultivation measures in order to...
Article
We investigated the effect of low level photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD; 43 - 230 µmol m(-2) s(-1)) on the major phenolic compounds of red leaf lettuce in three growth stages - before, during, and after head formation - using HPLC-DAD-ESI-MS(2) and evaluating via multiple regression analysis. Generally, the light-related increase of flavon...
Article
Full-text available
Cultivating lettuce in greenhouses at low temperatures improves its CO2-balance and may increase its content of flavonoid glycosides and phenolic acids. We cultivated 5weeks old red leaf lettuce seedlings at 20/15°C (day/night) or 12/7°C until plants reached comparable growth stages: small heads were harvested after 13 (warm) and 26 (cool)days, whi...
Data
Full-text available
Für den Gemüsebau entwickelte geschlossene Gewächshäuser koppeln Solarenergie an Tagen mit hoher Einstrahlung aus, speichern diese und nutzen sie für die Heizung in kühlen und dunklen Perioden. Der optimale Betrieb dieser Gewächshäuser erfordert neue Ansätze für die Klimaregelung: Im Fall der Wärmeauskopplung bleibt die Lüftung geschlossen – Temper...
Thesis
Flavonoide und Phenolsäuren schützen Pflanzen unter anderem vor Strahlung, welche – neben Temperatur und Ontogenie – deren Konzentration beeinflusst. Roter Blattsalat (Lactuca sativa L. var. crispa L.) enthält Quercetin-, Luteolin- und Cyanidinglykoside und Kaffeesäurederivate mit gesundheits-fördernder Wirkung – teilweise auf Grund ihrer antioxida...
Article
Full-text available
Applying transparent daytime screens in greenhouses in cool seasons reduces the amount of energy needed for heating, but also the solar radiation available for crops. This can reduce yield and product quality of leafy vegetables because of constrained photosynthesis and altered biosynthesis. To study this, we cultivated five-week old red leaf lettu...
Article
Elaiosomes of myrmecochorous plant seeds are known to enhance the attraction of diaspore-dispersing ants by serving as a nutritional reward. However, it remained unclear which (nutritional) compounds affect diaspore preferences of ants. We hypothesized that apart from elaiosome/seed-size ratio, volume, and physical surface of diaspores, the quantit...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
Little is known about the impacts of climate change to new and innovative controlling methods in agriculture using semiochemicals. Some systems may be jeopardized by the impacts of climate change in particular levels. Semiochemicals could be used as monitoring tools for determining exact spraying dates with possibilities to reduce the overall amount of insecticides or as lure for mass trapping. Further, sex pheromones can be used to disrupt the communication between conspecific insects. The latter is known as mating disruption. But climate change can potentially affect all levels of olfactory communication among and between insect that are mainly mediated by infochemicals. The aim of the project is to determine the effects of fundamental determinants of climate change (higher average temperatures, elevated CO2- and ozone-levels) on the perception and reaction of insects to semiochemicals, to find possible limitations for controlling methods based on semiochemicals and to find solutions to keep these systems working. The results will help by the development and improvement of innovative control methods for plant protection in fruit crops and viticulture like the mating disruption method and facilitating the reduction of greenhouse gases during production and application of insecticides.