Christine E Beardsworth

Christine E Beardsworth
NIOZ Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research | NIOZ · COS (TX) – Coastal Systems

PhD

About

27
Publications
3,822
Reads
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240
Citations
Introduction
Post-Doc: Investigating how individual differences influence the movement and foraging behaviour of red knots in the Wadden sea. PhD: Exploring the link between spatial cognitive ability and movement ecology
Education
September 2015 - October 2019
University of Exeter
Field of study
  • Animal Behaviour

Publications

Publications (27)
Article
Fine‐scale tracking of animal movement is important to understand the proximate mechanisms of animal behaviour. The reverse‐GPS system – ATLAS – uses inexpensive (~€25), lightweight (<1g) and low‐power (~0.4mJ/transmission) tags. Six systems are now operational worldwide and have successfully tracked over 50 species in various landscape types. The...
Article
Understanding animal movement is essential to elucidate how animals interact, survive, and thrive in a changing world. Recent technological advances in data collection and management have transformed our understanding of animal “movement ecology” (the integrated study of organismal movement), creating a big-data discipline that benefits from rapid,...
Preprint
Movement is a fundamental aspect of life and tracking wild animals under natural conditions has become central to animal behaviour, ecology, and conservation science. Data from tracked animals have provided novel scientific insights on extreme migratory journeys, mechanisms of navigation, space use, and early warning signals of environmental change...
Article
Full-text available
Variation in foraging tactics and diet are usually attributed to differences in morphology, experience, and prey availability. Recently, consistent individual differences in behaviour (personality) have been shown to be associated with foraging strategies. Bolder or more exploratory individuals are predicted to have a faster pace‐of‐life and offset...
Article
Full-text available
1. Modern, high‐throughput animal tracking increasingly yields ‘big data’ at very fine temporal scales. At these scales, location error can exceed the animal’s step size, leading to mis‐estimation of behaviours inferred from movement. ‘Cleaning’ the data to reduce location errors is one of the main ways to deal with position uncertainty. Though dat...
Article
Full-text available
Cognitive biases for encoding spatial information (orientation strategies) in relation to self (egocentric) or landmarks (allocentric) differ between species or populations according to the habitats they occupy. Whether biases in orientation strategy determine early habitat selection or if individuals adapt their biases following experience is unkn...
Article
Full-text available
Memories about the spatial environment, such as the locations of foraging patches, are expected to affect how individuals move around the landscape. However, individuals differ in the ability to remember spatial locations (spatial cognitive ability) and evidence is growing that these inter-individual differences influence a range of fitness proxies...
Preprint
Full-text available
Fine-scale tracking of animal movement is important to understand the proximate mechanisms of animal behaviour. While GPS tracking is an excellent tool for measuring animal movement, trade-offs between tag weight, cost and lifespan limit its application to relatively large species, a small number of individuals or short tracking durations, respecti...
Preprint
Full-text available
Modern, high-throughput animal tracking studies collect increasingly large volumes of data at very fine temporal scales. At these scales, location error can exceed the animal’s step size, leading to mis-estimation of key movement metrics such as speed. ‘Cleaning’ the data to reduce location errors prior to analyses is one of the main ways movement...
Article
Full-text available
To understand the evolution of cognitive abilities, we need to understand both how selection acts upon them and their genetic (co)variance structure. Recent work suggests that there are fitness consequences for free-living individuals with particular cognitive abilities. However, our current understanding of the heritability of these abilities is r...
Article
Social environments influence important ecological processes and can determine how selection acts on traits. Cognitive abilities can shape these social environments and in turn, affect individuals’ fitness. To understand how cognitive abilities evolve, we need to understand the complex interplay between an individual's cognitive abilities, the soci...
Article
Full-text available
The differential specialization of each side of the brain facilitates the parallel processing of information and has been documented in a wide range of animals. Animals that are more lateralized as indicated by consistent preferential limb use are commonly reported to exhibit superior cognitive ability as well as other behavioural advantages. We as...
Article
Full-text available
The ability to inhibit prepotent actions towards rewards that are made inaccessible by transparent barriers has been considered to reflect capacities for inhibitory control (IC). Typically, subjects initially reach directly, and incorrectly, for the reward. With experience, subjects may inhibit this action and instead detour around barriers to acce...
Article
Full-text available
Inhibitory control (IC) is the ability to intentionally restrain initial, ineffective responses to a stimulus and instead exhibit an alternative behaviour that is not pre-potent but which effectively attains a reward. Individuals (both humans and non-human animals) differ in their IC, perhaps as a result of the different environmental conditions th...
Preprint
Full-text available
The ability to inhibit prepotent actions towards rewards that are made inaccessible by transparent barriers has been considered to reflect capacities for inhibitory control (IC). Typically, subjects initially reach directly, and incorrectly, for the reward. With experience, subjects may inhibit this action and instead detour around barriers to acce...
Article
Full-text available
The ability to control impulsive actions is an important executive function that is central to the self-regulation of behaviours and, in humans, can have important implications for mental and physical health. One key factor that promotes individual differences in inhibitory control (IC) is the predictability of environmental information experienced...
Article
Full-text available
Individual differences in performances on cognitive tasks have been found to differ according to social rank across multiple species. However, it is not clear whether an individual’s cognitive performance is flexible and the result of their current social rank, modulated by social interactions (social state dependent hypothesis), or if it is determ...
Article
Full-text available
Fine scale sexual segregation outside of the mating season is common in sexually dimorphic and polygamous species, particularly in ungulates. A number of hypotheses predict sexual segregation but these are often contradictory with no agreement as to a common cause, perhaps because they are species specific. We explicitly tested three of these hypot...
Article
Full-text available
Cognitive abilities probably evolve through natural selection if they provide individuals with fitness benefits. A growing number of studies demonstrate a positive relationship between performance in psychometric tasks and (proxy) measures of fitness. We assayed the performance of 154 common pheasant (Phasianus colchicus) chicks on tests of acquisi...
Article
Full-text available
Brain lateralization is considered adaptive because it leads to behavioral biases and specializations that bring fitness benefits. Across species, strongly lateralized individuals perform better in specific behaviors likely to improve survival. What constrains continued exaggerated lateralization? We measured survival of pheasants, finding that ind...
Article
Full-text available
Individuals likely vary in how quickly they learn, how many different associations they may be able to maintain, and how long they can remember previously learned associations. However, it is unclear whether capacities for these cognitive processes are consistent within individuals, or whether individual performance differs when presented with nove...
Article
Sexual segregation is common and can occur when sexes occupy different habitats, and/or when sexes aggregate assortatively within the same habitats. However, it is rarely studied in birds, with most previous work concentrating on differential settlement by the sexes in discrete habitats, often separated by large distances. Little attention has been...
Article
Full-text available
Transparent Cylinder and Barrier tasks are used to purportedly assess inhibitory control in a variety of animals. However, we suspect that performances on these detour tasks are influenced by non-cognitive traits, which may result in inaccurate assays of inhibitory control. We therefore reared pheasants under standardized conditions and presented e...
Data
Methods, pictures of test apparatuses and flow diagram of inhibitory control performance across trials

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