Christine Bachrach

Christine Bachrach
University of Maryland, College Park | UMD, UMCP, University of Maryland College Park · Department of Sociology

About

64
Publications
3,920
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2,803
Citations
Citations since 2017
1 Research Item
731 Citations
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2017201820192020202120222023050100150
2017201820192020202120222023050100150
2017201820192020202120222023050100150

Publications

Publications (64)
Article
Full-text available
This paper grounds its analysis in a novel model (Bachrach and Morgan in Popul Dev Rev, 39:459–485, 2013) that suggests that responses to questions about fertility intentions may reflect distinct phenomena at distinct points in the life course. The model suggests that women form "true" intentions when their circumstances make the issue of childbear...
Article
This paper examines the potential contributions of a new longitudinal household survey that assesses physical health and the social and behavioral factors that impinge on it. It considers how such a survey could inform efforts to reduce health disparities in the United States and improve population health. Health is multiply determined by the inter...
Article
Demography and culture have had a long but ambivalent relationship. Cultural influences are widely recognized as important for demographic outcomes but are often "backgrounded" in demographic research. I argue that progress toward a more successful integration is feasible and suggest a network model of culture as a potential tool. The network model...
Article
We examine the use and value of fertility intentions against the backdrop of theory and research in the cognitive and social sciences. First, we draw on recent brain and cognition research to contextualize fertility intentions within a broader set of conscious and unconscious mechanisms that contribute to mental function. Next, we integrate this re...
Article
Over the past 40 years, a new social field has emerged in the United States: the field of infertility. This social field has a unique set of institutions, social positions, and norms; a plethora of fora for public engagement; and a unique lexicon. Its institutions include clinics and laboratories, financial institutions, legal specialties, adoption...
Article
Fertility has declined dramatically over the last half-century while substantial variations in fertility levels remain (see United Nations, 2008). Specifically, fertility remains well above replacement levels in many African countries and in some Asian and Latin American and Caribbean countries; fertility levels in developed—and increasingly some d...
Article
Karen grew up in inner city Philadelphia. She started seeing Bill, a 20 year-old handyman, when she was 16 and soon became pregnant. Karen dropped out of high school during her third trimester, and moved in with Bill. Karen and Bill lived together for about a year and a half before they broke up. Karen now lives at home in a small apartment with he...
Article
This chapter describes the theory of conjunctural action (TCA). In developing it, we draw primarily on the “duality of structure” model developed by Sewell (1992, 2005) in his account of historical change, and on the related models of society and history in Bourdieu (1977, 1998) and Giddens (1979, 1984). However, we also begin to draw on a broad ar...
Chapter
Our project in this book aims at consilience, a term popularized by Wilson (1998, p. 8) to signify a “jumping together” of perspectives and facts to produce a “unity of knowledge”. In this way, our efforts resonate with current trends toward multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary theory and research. It is important to note that seeking consilienc...
Book
Fertility rates vary considerably across and within societies, and over time. Over the last three decades, social demographers have made remarkable progress in documenting these axes of variation, but theoretical models to explain family change and variation have lagged behind. At the same time, our sister disciplines—from cultural anthropology to...
Chapter
Full-text available
Funding agencies are increasingly encouraging researchers to make their data available for secondary uses. Developing a data sharing plan requires investigators to balance user access with the need to protect confidentiality and prevent harm to participants. An effective plan selects an appropriate model for data sharing; develops procedures and to...
Article
This report, Social, behavioral and economic Research in the Federal Context, was developed by the National Science and Technology Council. The social, behavioral and economic (SBE) sciences are focused on human behavior and the actions of groups and organizations at every level. Research information provided by the SBE sciences can provide policy-...
Article
To describe and reflect on an effort to document, through a set of 6 interventions, the process of adapting effective youth risk behavior interventions for new settings, and to provide insights into how this might best be accomplished. Six studies were funded by the NIH, starting in 1999. The studies were funded in response to a Request for Applica...
Article
Twenty years ago, the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) issued a request for proposals that resulted in the National Survey of Families and Households (NSFH), a unique survey valuable to a wide range of family scholars. This paper describes the efforts of an interdisciplinary group of family demographers to build on t...
Article
Despite concerns in some scientific fields, data sharing has come of age. In 1985, the National Academy of Sciences' Committee on National Statistics endorsed the goal of wide access to research data and proffered recommendations for how and when data should be shared.1 Nearly 2 decades later, after numerous similar reports,2- 4 a clear mandate is...
Article
Programs within the National Institutes of Health (NIH) have recently taken steps to enhance social science contributions to health research. A June 2000 conference convened by the NIH Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research highlighted the role of the social sciences in health research and developed an agenda for advancing such research....
Article
It is argued that this book (see record 1999-04118-000) contains some interesting overview-type chapters that identify one aspect of self-reports and that provide researchers with findings that either help them to design their questionnaires so that they obtain more veridical self-reports or at least help them to interpret self-report findings accu...
Article
Full-text available
This report presents information on trends and variations in nonmarital childbearing in the United States and includes information on the factors that have contributed to the recent changes. Data are presented for 1940-99 with emphasis on the trends in the 1990's. Data in this report are presented on a variety of measures of nonmarital childbearing...
Chapter
It’s hard to imagine a more “biosocial” research arena than the study of human fertility. Human biology provides the means for reproduction and defmes the way in which it occurs, while human actors and the social worlds they occupy exercise considerable control over whether and when they have children. Thus, it is somewhat surprising that this crit...
Article
PIP This article examines the entity of intended and unintended pregnancy. Results provided a strong evidence of bias. The reason for this bias may be due to an increased pressure for women to give a socially desirable response. This problem suggested three potential courses of action, such as: a combination of traditional cross-sectional studies w...
Article
This report presents national data on adoption and adoption-related behaviors among ever-married women 18-44 years of age in the United States, according to selected characteristics of the women. Trends are shown in the prevalence of adoption and relinquishment of children for adoption. For 1995, the report shows demand for adoption and women's pre...
Article
Full-text available
The Research Digest column describes the contents, availability and methods of accessing large datasets suitable for adoption research. With data collected by or funded by a variety of federal government agencies, the accessibility of these archival datasets enables researchers to pursue some of their investigative interests without all the problem...
Article
About 50 studies based on the 1988 National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG) and a telephone reinterview conducted with the same women two years later provide continuing information about the fertility and health of American women. Among the findings of these studies are that black women have almost twice as many pregnancies as do white women (5.1 vs...
Article
The abstract for this document is available on CSA Illumina.To view the Abstract, click the Abstract button above the document title.
Article
According to 1982 and 1988 NSFG data, unmarried white women are far less likely than they were in the early 1970s to place their children for adoption. The levels of relinquishment among black women have remained low throughout this period, and relinquishment among Hispanic women may be virtually nonexistent. Multivariate analysis of the determinan...
Article
Data from the National Survey of Family Growth provide the basis for the first estimate based on direct measures of the population seeking to adopt in the United States. Over 2 million women of reproductive age were estimated to have ever sought to adopt, and about 200,000 women were estimated to be currently seeking. Results of logistic regression...
Article
New data on sexual activity among U.S. women collected by the National Center for Health Statistics is reported in the National Survey of Family Growth Cycle III and includes information on activity of never-married women and on premarital onset of coitus. 7969 women aged 15-44 were surveyed. The proportion of ever-married women sexually active bef...
Article
Current use of oral contraceptives among currently married women aged 15-44 declined from 25 percent to 13 percent between 1973 and 1982, while ever-use increased from 60 percent to 80 percent. By 1982, the pill appeared to be used mainly to delay first pregnancies, secondarily to space subsequent conceptions, and only rarely as a means of ending c...
Article
This study shows the first national estimates of trends and differentials in first contraceptive use for a national sample of all women. Only 47 percent of women aged 15-44 in 1982 (or their partners) used a method at first premarital intercourse. The leading method at first intercourse was the condom, followed by the pill and withdrawal. The perce...
Article
Data on adoption, adopted children, and children placed for adoption by women 15-44 years of age are presented, based on the 1982 National Survey of Family Growth. The results of this analysis suggest that the downward trend in the annual number of adoptions observed from 1970 through 1975 has leveled off. White women giving birth premaritally were...
Article
The 1st overview of findings from Cycle III of the National Survey of Family Growth, the latest of 7 such surveys of US fertility since 1955 and the 1st to cover all women of childbearing age in the conterminous US is presented. Interviews between August 1982 and February 1983 with 7969 women, representative of 54 million women aged 15-44, reveal t...
Article
During the decade 1973-1982, use of oral contraceptives declined sharply among wives aged 15-44, although the total number of pill users did not decrease after 1979. This drop occurred in all groups of wives examined. At the same time, the prevalence of female contraceptive sterilization rose sharply; this increase occurred mainly among wives aged...
Article
Presents the first overview of findings from Cycle III of the National Survey of Family Growth, the latest of seven such surveys of US fertility since 1955 and the first to cover all women of childbearing age in the conterminous U.S. Interviews between August 1982 and February 1983 with 7969 women, representative of 54 million women aged 15-44, rev...
Article
Adoption of children other than stepchildren is rare among all married couples in the United States, but in some subgroups of the population it is an important means of acquiring children. Data from a national sample of women interviewed in 1976 are analyzed to show that having adopted a child was most common among women who had never borne a child...
Article
Characteristics of children living with biological, step- and adoptive mothers 15-44 years of age in 1976 are presented according to the child's relationship to mother and relationship to father. Children living with both biological parents were similar to those living with a biological parent and a stepparent with respect to most of the characteri...
Article
PIP Using a representative sample of about 17,000 ever married women 15 to 44 years of age, this article presents national estimates of the prevalence and correlates of voluntary, involuntary, and temporary childlessness in the United States. These three groups of childless couples are compared with the parents of small planned families and other p...
Article
Retrospective fertility histories were collected from a purposive sample of 211 white, ever-married women, residing in four metropolitan areas of the USA and belonging to the birth cohorts of 1901-1910. At the time of interview, these women were aged 66 to 76. A random sample of 50 of the original respondents was reinterviewed by telephone on selec...
Article
About 50 studies based on the 1988 National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG) and a telephone reinterview conducted with the same women two years later provide continuing information about the fertility and health of American women. Among the findings of these studies are that black women have almost twice as many pregnancies as do white women (5.1 vs...
Article
Hypothesis 2: Children's participation in schools will affect social, emotional, and physical development. Provision of health services and of curricula and programs targeted toward health promotion will directly impact on children's health and mental health outcomes. Child, family, and community factors interact with structural and functional aspe...
Article
Thesis--Johns Hopkins University, 1979. Vita. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 337-346). Photocopy of original typescript.

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