Christine Angelini

Christine Angelini
University of Florida | UF · Department of Environmental Engineering Sciences

About

54
Publications
16,112
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1,584
Citations
Citations since 2017
33 Research Items
1169 Citations
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2017201820192020202120222023050100150200250
2017201820192020202120222023050100150200250
2017201820192020202120222023050100150200250

Publications

Publications (54)
Article
Facilitation cascades arise where primary foundation species facilitate secondary (dependent) foundation species, and collectively, they increase habitat complexity and quality to enhance biodiversity. Whether such phenomena occur in nonmarine systems and if secondary foundation species enhance food web structure (e.g., support novel feeding guilds...
Article
Full-text available
Biogeomorphic wetlands cover 1% of Earth’s surface but store 20% of ecosystem organic carbon. This disproportional share is fueled by high carbon sequestration rates and effective storage in peatlands, mangroves, salt marshes, and seagrass meadows, which greatly exceed those of oceanic and forest ecosystems. Here, we review how feedbacks between ge...
Article
Full-text available
Habitat heterogeneity is considered a primary causal driver underpinning patterns of diversity, yet the universal role of heterogeneity in structuring biodiversity is unclear due to a lack of coordinated experiments testing its effects across geographic scales and habitat types. Furthermore, key species interactions that can enhance heterogeneity,...
Article
Full-text available
Consumers can structure plant communities and may function as keystone species or ecosystem engineers. In salt marshes, the prevailing paradigm has shifted in recent decades from nearly complete focus on bottom‐up processes to inclusion of top‐down effects. Although the number of studies investigating top‐down control continues to climb, few experi...
Article
Full-text available
1. Ecosystems are degrading worldwide, with severe ecological and economic consequences. Restoration is becoming an important tool to regain ecosystem services and preserve biodiversity. However, in harsh ecosystems dominated by habitat‐modifying organisms, restoration is often expensive and failure prone. Establishment of such habitat‐modifiers of...
Article
1‐ Climate change is generating extreme climate events, affecting ecosystem integrity and function directly through increases in abiotic stress and disturbance and indirectly through changes in the strength of biotic interactions. As consumers play an essential role in ecosystem functioning and have been shown to be highly sensitive to climate cond...
Article
Full-text available
Restoration is becoming a vital tool to counteract coastal ecosystem degradation. Modifying transplant designs of habitat-forming organisms from dispersed to clumped can amplify coastal restoration yields as it generates self-facilitation from emergent traits, i.e. traits not expressed by individuals or small clones, but that emerge in clumped indi...
Article
Full-text available
Foundation species are typically suggested to enhance community diversity non‐trophically by increasing habitat structure and mitigating physical stress, while their trophic role is considered of minor importance. Yet, there is little experimental evidence on the relative importance of trophic and non‐trophic effects and the interaction with patch...
Article
Full-text available
Foundation species often interact with each other and co-create habitat upon which other species depend. Whether the presence of these facilitated species feeds back to mediate the growth and resilience of the foundation species themselves, and influence the strength of their interactions, remains poorly understood. In a 16-month field experiment i...
Article
Increasing rates of sea-level rise and wave action threaten coastal populations. Defense of shorelines by protection and restoration of wetlands has been invoked as a win-win strategy for humans and nature, yet evidence from field experiments supporting the wetland protection function is uncommon, as is the understanding of its context dependency....
Article
Salt marshes suffered large‐scale degradation in recent decades. Extreme events such as hot and dry spells contributed significantly to this, and are predicted to increase not only in intensity, but also in frequency under future climate scenarios. Such repetitive extreme events may generate cumulative effects on ecosystem resilience. It is therefo...
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Full-text available
Understanding the interactive effects of species invasions and climate change is essential for predicting future shifts in biodiversity. Because multiple stressors can interact in synergistic or antagonistic ways, it is notoriously difficult to anticipate their combined effects on species assemblages. However, some hypotheses predict that plant inv...
Article
Full-text available
Food webs are an integral part of every ecosystem on the planet, yet understanding the mechanisms shaping these complex networks remains a major challenge. Recently, several studies suggested that non-trophic species interactions such as habitat modification and mutualisms can be important determinants of food web structure. However, it remains unc...
Data
Watermilfoil indirectly stimulates the food web by increasing periphyton availability. (A) Watermilfoil increased periphyton cover. (B) Trophic dependency on periphyton as a food source is much higher than on Watermilfoil. (TIF)
Data
Detailed description of sampling methods per model ecosystem. (DOCX)
Data
Trophic dependency on foundation species compared to other species in the network. Trophic dependency is not higher for foundation species when expressed as vulnerability (A) the total number of links compared to the other species (B), or the number of outgoing links of basal foundation species versus other basal species (C)) for which the number o...
Data
Stress mitigation in marram grass plots compared to bare sand. Marram grass mitigates (A) wind speed and (B) maximum temperature and temperature variability. (TIF)
Data
Food web properties averaged and per ecosystem. Properties are arranged in Marine, Freshwater and Terrestrial (Sg: Seagrass, Cg: Cordgrass, Bm: Blue mussel, Wm: Watermilfoil, Ws: Water-starwort, Mg: Marram grass, Sm: Spanish moss) averaged for Foundation species-dominated food webs (FS), food webs from bare areas (BA) and random removal networks (R...
Data
Food web metrics calculated for all food webs. (XLSX)
Article
Full-text available
Climate change and consumer outbreaks are driving ecosystem collapse worldwide. Although much research has demonstrated that these factors can interact, how heterogeneity in top–down control intensity and physical forcing modulates ecosystem resilience to climate stress remains poorly understood. Here, we explore whether the nocturnal herbivorous c...
Article
Full-text available
It has long been recognized that primary foundation species (FS), such as trees and seagrasses, enhance biodiversity. Among the species facilitated are secondary FS, including mistletoes and epiphytes. Case studies have demonstrated that secondary FS can further modify habitat-associated organisms ('inhabitants'), but their net effects remain unkno...
Article
Mounting evidence shows that the functioning and stability of coastal ecosystems often depends critically on habitat-forming foundation species such as seagrasses, mangroves and saltmarsh grasses that engage in facultative mutualistic interactions. However, although restoration science is now gradually expanding its long-standing paradigm of minimi...
Article
Full-text available
Abiotic global change drivers affect ecosystem structure and function, but how they interact with biotic factors such as invasive plants is understudied. Such interactions may be additive, synergistic, or offsetting, and difficult to predict. We present methods to test the individual and interactive effects of drought and plant invasion on native e...
Article
Full-text available
Droughts are increasing in severity and frequency, yet the mechanisms that strengthen ecosystem resilience to this stress remain poorly understood. Here, we test whether positive interactions in the form of a mutualism between mussels and dominant cordgrass in salt marshes enhance ecosystem resistance to and recovery from drought. Surveys spanning...
Data
Supplementary Figures 1-7 and Supplementary Tables 1-3
Article
Full-text available
The diversity and structure of ecosystems has been found to depend both on trophic interactions in food webs and on other species interactions such as habitat modification and mutualism that form non-trophic interaction networks. However, quantification of the dependencies between these two main interaction networks has remained elusive. In this st...
Article
Explaining variability in the strength and sign of trophic interactions between primary consumers and plants is a long-standing research challenge. Consumer density and body size vary widely in space and time and are predicted to have interactive effects on consumer–plant interactions. In a southern US salt marsh, we used replicate field enclosures...
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Although an increasing number of studies have shown that biodiversity simultaneously enhances multiple ecosystem functions, their conclusions are based largely on small-scale biodiversity manipulations. Hence, which mechanisms maintain high biodiversity patches in natural systems and if these patches elevate ecosystem multifunctionality at both loc...
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Invasive species threaten biodiversity and incur costs exceeding billions of US$. Eradication efforts, however, are nearly always unsuccessful. Throughout much of North America, land managers have used expensive, and ultimately ineffective, techniques to combat invasive Phragmites australis in marshes. Here, we reveal that Phragmites may potentiall...
Conference Paper
Background/Question/Methods In habitat-forming facilitation cascades, primary foundation species facilitate additional (secondary) foundation species colonization and, combined, they enhance biodiversity. Whether some terrestrial assemblages exhibit such hierarchical organization, and if secondary foundation species simply increase species divers...
Article
Full-text available
Overexploitation of predators has been linked to the collapse of a growing number of shallow-water marine ecosystems. However, salt-marsh ecosystems are often viewed and managed as systems controlled by physical processes, despite recent evidence for herbivore-driven die-off of marsh vegetation. Here we use field observations, experiments, and hist...
Article
Massive anthropogenic and climate-related disturbances are now common in ecosystems worldwide, generating widespread die-off and subsequent community recovery dominated by remnant-patch dynamics rather than open-gap dynamics. Whether communities can recover and, if so, which factors mediate recolonization rate and extent remain unresolved. Here we...
Article
Full-text available
Foundation species create complex habitats in which associated organisms find refuge from biological and physical stress; these foundation species are thus fundamental to the structure and resilience of terrestrial and marine ecosystems. In the present article, we develop an approach to understanding foundation species' effects in communities that...
Article
Full-text available
Exotic plant invaders that form monocultures and exclude native plants are often the most detrimental to native diversity and the hardest to eradicate. To generate a monoculture, the invader must garner more resources than resident natives and, once established, persist despite high densities of conspecific neighbors. Coincident with expansion and...
Article
Many mechanisms of invasive species success have been elucidated, but those driving cryptic invasions of non-native genotypes remain least understood. In one of the most successful cryptic plant invasions in North America, we investigate the mechanisms underlying the displacement of native Phragmites australis by its Eurasian counterpart. Since inv...
Article
Full-text available
The cordgrass Spartina alterniflora Loisel is a foundation species critical to the establishment and maintenance of western Atlantic salt marshes. Although the factors regulating cordgrass growth along sheltered, fine-sediment shorelines have been exhaustively studied, less is known about the mechanisms that maintain cordgrass production in high-en...
Article
Cordgrass die-offs in Cape Cod, Massachusetts, USA, salt marshes have challenged the view that the primary production of New England salt marshes is controlled by physical factors. These die-offs have increased dramatically over the last decade and are caused by the common herbivorous marsh crab Sesarma reticulatum, but other factors that control c...
Article
Full-text available
Die-offs of cordgrass are pervasive throughout western Atlantic salt marshes, yet understanding of the mechanisms precipitating these events is limited. We tested whether herbivory by the native crab, Sesarma reticulatum, is generating die-offs of cordgrass that are currently occurring on Cape Cod, Massachusetts (U.S.A.), by manipulating crab acces...
Article
Full-text available
Although primary productivity in salt marshes is thought to be controlled by physical forces, recent evidence suggests that human disturbances can drive a switch to consumer control in these ecologically valuable ecosystems. We tested the hypothesis that nitrogen enrichment can trigger consumer control in salt marshes in Narragansett Bay, Rhode Isl...

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